Environment vs Character

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    129
    Thanked 218 Times in 181 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Environment vs Character

    When viewing open artist positions there are multiple titles - illustration artist, concept artist, environment artist, character artist, creature artist, 3D artist, 2D artist - and so on.

    For an artist who specializes in only one of those catagories how important is it to incorporate multiple facets of art into one image?

    Some artists know their strengths and their weaknesses but in order to provide an all-inclusive portfolio they feel necessary to incorporate different areas of art concentration. Now this may or may not hinder the outcome of a painting ... but

    So my question is this ... how important is it to have an "environment" or a "background" when painting characters or even creatures? Is the finished character or creature enough for a completed painting? Remember that it is the potential employer that is viewing the painting!!

    Thanks,
    R.

    "Creativity emerges only when the imagination is given the freedom it deserves."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    874
    Thanks
    168
    Thanked 119 Times in 72 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Umm I'm not sure if I understood your question correctly, but in a production environment most commonly you will only do a character/creature design on a plane background as a)they only want to see the design of the character b) there is no point for you to waste time painting a background as the environment guy will be doing the designs of those. Full illustrations that use all those things are usually only done for promotional/or key/mood purposes.

    But then again it depends on where, what and for who you work

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    129
    Thanked 218 Times in 181 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks Rayk ... I appreciate your comments but maybe I should be more clear.

    If a potential employer is going to take the time to view a portfolio, should the images in that portfolio have both a character/creature and an environment/background. ... Or .... will the potential employer be content with viewing paintings that concentrate on the character/creature and forego any kind of environment/background?

    Hope that helps!

    "Creativity emerges only when the imagination is given the freedom it deserves."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,743
    Thanks
    737
    Thanked 470 Times in 316 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Look at concept art. Look at a lot of character and creature designs. You'll find some in Finally Finished.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    10
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you're good at both character & environment design then go for it, but if your environments are not as good as your character qualities, then I would leave it out, have a blank background instead as a bad background may spoil a good character image & vice versa. If you're really persistant in adding other elements then I would have a seperate section in portfolio for other stuff, i.e. characters, environments, illustrations etc.

    Hope this helps

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canada. Alberta
    Posts
    338
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    "Some artists know their strengths and their weaknesses "

    Im sure its important to have fluid enviornment with characters. So, Suggesting that you know the enviornment artist well enough to understand his style to incorporate into yours, vice versa.. Should be okay'

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    A background is best when the characters are in movement, telling a story of what they are doing. When it's just a focus on the character's design, then a background isn't really needed.

    Now as for the portfolio, it's all about showing your strengths. If you are good at character/creature designs, then showing those off will show your skills in character/creature design and anatomy. If you are better at backgrounds and environments, then showing those off will show your skills in composition, design of environment, lighting and shading (which is also a biggie for character/creature design), and perspective. Heck, you can do both to show you're good at most of those.

    ------
    Wait... What were we talking about?
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook