Local tone and light
 
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  1. #1
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    Local tone and light

    Hi. I just have questions about the local tone of objects and how they interact with light.

    Is it right to say that an object with a darker tone absorbs more light than an object that is lighter?

    Does that make the light on the darker toned object lower in value than the light in the lighter toned object?

    Thanks for the help, and please feel free to explain more about this subject.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dizon View Post
    Is it right to say that an object with a darker tone absorbs more light than an object that is lighter?

    Does that make the light on the darker toned object lower in value than the light in the lighter toned object?
    Assuming they have the same surface characteristics, yes.


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    Took me a few minutes to understand your question. I've never thought of it like that. I guess the best way to see what the differences would be is the same two toned objects placed in different lighting situations. With brighter light shining on the objects, there's obviously more contrast, but I assume it's the rendering of the individual objects that makes that little bit of knowledge helpful.

    That really makes me wonder about reflective light and colors onto other objects. I'd assume that a darker object doesn't give off as much reflective light onto other objects and environment as lighter objects. In other words, if you had a still life setup with a bunch of white objects and a few light high chroma objects, you'd be painting more dabs of different colors all over the scene. As opposed to a bunch of dark gray toned objects with some high chroma, but dark toned objects put in the middle of the scene. Even if there was more light shining in the dark toned setup, there wouldn't be as many colors and light/shadows scattered around?

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