Convert to Vista64?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Convert to Vista64?

    The computer I'm using now has Windows XP. A friend of mine has a Vista64 system and I'm thinking about buying it.

    How would I transfer everything over to the vista computer? Would it be hard?

    Will it take my outlook file, favorites and my docs?

    What about programs? Would I be able to use my WinXP Photoshop install disk for Vista64?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    sweden
    Posts
    7,475
    Thanks
    1,696
    Thanked 1,219 Times in 624 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    its actually very easy. especially from Windows XP 32bit.

    You should backup application resources though, just in case.

    When you pop-in the disk with Windows Vista, it will ask you to save all the documents from Windows Xp 32bit into a "old.windows" file located under your primary hard drive .

    If own Photoshop you should first backup all resources ( Plugins, brushes or whatever ) and then uninstall before transfering to vista. Make sure you de-activate the serial and or else it won't work when you're reinstalling it on Vista. ( it will ask you to de-activate it under uninstall )

    And thats basically it.. Photoshop CS4 has support for 64bit , and CS3 will run well on it aswell.. ( won't support 64bit features though.) I don't know about the other versions.

    good luck =)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Brashen's Avatar
    Brashen is offline Ralph Abou Raad - Professional Level 9 Gladiator: Hoplomachi
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Lebanon
    Posts
    1,498
    Thanks
    230
    Thanked 491 Times in 271 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah what he said!!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Wow - thanks for that. That's a great pont to uninstall and deactivat my photoshop. i never would have thougt of that.

    Thank you. I was hoping it was going to be eazy.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I wouldn't convert to Vista if I were you. The system sucks up a lot of resources. Photoshop and Painter lag horribly in my brand new laptop, making me feel like I'm using a 4-year-old machine.
    So if you really want to try Vista, at least make sure you can easily downgrade to XP again. Some people have no problem whatsoever, especially when starting from a clean install (not a factory install), but many others (including me) do, to the point that if I had known, I would have waited for Windows 7 to be released before I got a laptop.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just built a new system with Vista64, and it was painless, and runs like greased lightning.

    It is NOT a resource hog, unless you have every bit of Vista eye-candy turned on, and even then, with the x64 version you can easily supply it far more memory than you could in XP due to the 4GB limit. Secondly, since it tries to preload your most commonly used applications and documents in memory, it might appear to start up slower and use more RAM than it 'should', but it is actually saving you time by putting your stuff into RAM before you ask for it. This feature can be turned off. Thirdly, it is very cheap to put 6GB on the newer motherboards that have the slots and the capability to address that ram from the BIOS. Since by default, WinXP takes half your available RAM for system use, and the absolute max RAM under XP x32 is 4GB, then XP is taking up to 2GB of your RAM. Since part of the 4GB limit is used up by video card RAM, which has to be addressed out of the 4GB pool, your apps will probably never even see more than 1.8GB available to them, and with a browser open and a security suite, etc., running in the background, it is more common to have no more than a full GB effectively available to a single app! After using Vista x64 with 6GB of RAM for two months, I have never seen it take as much RAM for itself as my 4GB XP system used to take. So the 'resource hog' label is completely inaccurate, at least in comparing anything like apples to apples with XP. Of course, don't turn on live video wallpaper and Aero graphics that allow translucent window frames, etc. (But you can see the motion graphics of the wallpaper through the translucent frames!) That is obviously going to take more resources than plain XP. Duh.

    Upgrading a three or four-year-old system, for example, to Vista x64 might not be the best idea, however. You would want to verify that your existing hardware is compatible. For a painless upgrade, using hardware that is certified Vista-ready is the ideal.

    Ultimately, the really BIG reason to go to Vista x64 right now is to be able to put 6 to 12 GB of RAM to use in an app like PS. In some apps, you can also get improvements from 64-bit computing, but most apps just haven't been written to benefit from that yet, so RAM is still the prime reason. There IS a difference between a Vista x64-compatible app, and a 64-bit app. Some 32-bit apps have been re-compiled to be 'compatible' with Vista64. You effectively get no real gains, even in memory utilization. Some apps have been tweaked to at least use some degree of additional memory under a 64-bit OS, but again, they still aren't really true '64-bit apps' under the hood. Finally, there are a small number of apps that are written to truly be optimized for a 64-bit system. The number of these applications are still relatively small. And then there is the extra complication of all the support drivers, such as the Wacom driver, the 3DConnexion driver for a 3D mouse (and the PS plugin for the 3D mouse), etc. Right now, the standard Inuos3 pen works fine in CS4 x64, but I can't get rotation to work with the 6D Art pen within CS4 on my Vista64 system. Also, the 3DConnexion Space Traveller 3D mouse works under Vista64, but the CS4 plugin that enables the 3D mouse within CS4 apparently only works in conjunction with CS4 x32, not CS4 x64. (A version of CS4 is installed in both the Program Files directory and the Program Files x86 directory. The x86 directory is where 32-bit programs are installed under Vista64.)

    There is a Settings and File backup utility built into XP: Go to Start->Programs->Accessories->System Tools->Files and Settings Transfer Wizard. This will backup and compress all files and settings, BUT I don't know how well this works when you are going from XP to Vista. It might be safer overall to just install Vista on a new primary harddrive, and keep your old XP drive unchanged for the next 6 months or so, so that you can always go back to it to hunt down some files that you completely forgot about, such as those custom brush files or the custom filters or actions you bought online and installed in a unique location.

    - Jay

    "Talent and all that for the most part is nothing but hogwash. Any schoolboy with a little aptitude might very well draw better than I perhaps; but what he most often lacks is the tough yearning for realization, the teeth-grinding obstinacy and saying: even though I know I'm not capable of it, I'm still going to do it." -- M.C. Escher, in a letter to his son Arthur, 12 February 1955
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just built a new system with Vista64, and it was painless, and runs like greased lightning.

    It is NOT a resource hog, unless you have every bit of Vista eye-candy turned on, and even then, with the x64 version you can easily supply it far more memory than you could in XP due to the 4GB limit. Secondly, since it tries to preload your most commonly used applications and documents in memory, it might appear to start up slower and use more RAM than it 'should', but it is actually saving you time by putting your stuff into RAM before you ask for it. This feature can be turned off. Thirdly, it is very cheap to put 6GB on the newer motherboards that have the slots and the capability to address that ram from the BIOS. Since by default, WinXP takes half your available RAM for system use, and the absolute max RAM under XP x32 is 4GB, then XP is taking up to 2GB of your RAM. Since part of the 4GB limit is used up by video card RAM, which has to be addressed out of the 4GB pool, your apps will probably never even see more than 1.8GB available to them, and with a browser open and a security suite, etc., running in the background, it is more common to have no more than a full GB effectively available to a single app! After using Vista x64 with 6GB of RAM for two months, I have never seen it take as much RAM for itself as my 4GB XP system used to take. So the 'resource hog' label is completely inaccurate, at least in comparing anything like apples to apples with XP. Of course, don't turn on live video wallpaper and Aero graphics that allow translucent window frames, etc. (But you can see the motion graphics of the wallpaper through the translucent frames!) That is obviously going to take more resources than plain XP. Duh.

    Upgrading a three or four-year-old system, for example, to Vista x64 might not be the best idea, however. You would want to verify that your existing hardware is compatible. For a painless upgrade, using hardware that is certified Vista-ready is the ideal.

    Ultimately, the really BIG reason to go to Vista x64 right now is to be able to put 6 to 12 GB of RAM to use in an app like PS. In some apps, you can also get improvements from 64-bit computing, but most apps just haven't been written to benefit from that yet, so RAM is still the prime reason. There IS a difference between a Vista x64-compatible app, and a 64-bit app. Some 32-bit apps have been re-compiled to be 'compatible' with Vista64. You effectively get no real gains, even in memory utilization. Some apps have been tweaked to at least use some degree of additional memory under a 64-bit OS, but again, they still aren't really true '64-bit apps' under the hood. Finally, there are a small number of apps that are written to truly be optimized for a 64-bit system. The number of these applications are still relatively small. And then there is the extra complication of all the support drivers, such as the Wacom driver, the 3DConnexion driver for a 3D mouse (and the PS plugin for the 3D mouse), etc. Right now, the standard Inuos3 pen works fine in CS4 x64, but I can't get rotation to work with the 6D Art pen within CS4 on my Vista64 system. Also, the 3DConnexion Space Traveller 3D mouse works under Vista64, but the CS4 plugin that enables the 3D mouse within CS4 apparently only works in conjunction with CS4 x32, not CS4 x64. (A version of CS4 is installed in both the Program Files directory and the Program Files x86 directory. The x86 directory is where 32-bit programs are installed under Vista64.)

    There is a Settings and File backup utility built into XP: Go to Start->Programs->Accessories->System Tools->Files and Settings Transfer Wizard. This will backup and compress all files and settings, BUT I don't know how well this works when you are going from XP to Vista. It might be safer overall to just install Vista on a new primary harddrive, and keep your old XP drive unchanged for the next 6 months or so, so that you can always go back to it to hunt down some files that you completely forgot about, such as those custom brush files or the custom filters or actions you bought online and installed in a unique location.

    - Jay

    "Talent and all that for the most part is nothing but hogwash. Any schoolboy with a little aptitude might very well draw better than I perhaps; but what he most often lacks is the tough yearning for realization, the teeth-grinding obstinacy and saying: even though I know I'm not capable of it, I'm still going to do it." -- M.C. Escher, in a letter to his son Arthur, 12 February 1955
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    1,127
    Thanks
    255
    Thanked 888 Times in 414 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've got both Vista x64 and XP x86 installed, and another partition for files and such. Be sure you have all the correct drivers for your hardware before you upgrade, either put them on a flash drive or a separate partition that won't be erased when you install vista. It will just take a little searching on your part to get the files you want to keep from your old OS and applications and put them on a flash drive to transfer.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •