blue meteorite?
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Thread: blue meteorite?

  1. #1
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    "Degenesis" is the first thing that popped into my mind.

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    Any CA members from that area see/hear/experience the thing?

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    Hehe that's my home town very cool stuff.

    Unfortunately I wasn't there. My best buddy experienced it -- not much more to add than this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pX6KXsdGsR0

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    wtf that thing is not normal lol

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    Interceptor is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Just looks like a bright light in a blue sky, to me.

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    Different elements in a meteor can give off certain colors as it burns up in the atmosphere. It's kinda like what makes fireworks different colors.

    ...Here's a more in depth explanation.

    5. Can fireballs appear in different colors? Vivid colors are more often reported by fireball observers because the brightness is great enough to fall well within the range of human color vision. These must be treated with some caution, however, because of well-known effects associated with the persistence of vision.
    Reported colors range across the spectrum, from red to bright blue, and (rarely) violet. The dominant composition of a meteoroid can play an important part in the observed colors of a fireball, with certain elements displaying signature colors when vaporized.
    For example, sodium produces a bright yellow color, nickel shows as green, and magnesium as blue-white. The velocity of the meteor also plays an important role, since a higher level of kinetic energy will intensify certain colors compared to others.
    Among fainter objects, it seems to be reported that slow meteors are red or orange, while fast meteors frequently have a blue color, but for fireballs the situation seems more complex than that, but perhaps only because of the curiousities of color vision as mentioned above.
    The difficulties of specifying meteor color arise because meteor light is dominated by an emission, rather than a continuous, spectrum. The majority of light from a fireball radiates from a compact cloud of material immediately surrounding the meteoroid or closely trailing it. 95% of this cloud consists of atoms from the surrounding atmosphere; the balance consists of atoms of vaporized elements from the meteoroid itself. These excited particles will emit light at wavelengths characteristic for each element.
    The most common emission lines observed in the visual portion of the spectrum from ablated material in the fireball head originate from iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), and sodium (Na). Silicon (Si) may be under-represented due to incomplete dissociation of SiO2 molecules. Manganese (Mn), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu) have been observed in fireball spectra, along with rarer elements. The refractory elements Aluminum (Al), Calcium (Ca), and Titanium (Ti) tend to be incompletely vaporized and thus also under-represented in fireball spectra.


    Last edited by Silvertone; January 26th, 2009 at 04:37 PM.
    You are a level 8 ninja and even though you have a lot of weapons sometimes your ninja moves are your most powerful.
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