Oil Painting on Wood

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Thread: Oil Painting on Wood

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    Oil Painting on Wood

    I'm going to be doing a painting on wood and would like to know if anyone has a cheap method to prime it. Gesso isnt really an option because I need to keep the wood texture completely visible on all the spots that the oil will not be on. I found this stuff, http://www.minwax.com/products/water...tive_finishes/. But dont really have the cash on the moment and some people mentioned it may amber over time. Does anyone have some ideas as to what I could use, I'm somewhat new to oil painting and painting on wood. Worst comes to worse I guess I could just outline my painting and fill in the certain areas that need to be painted with the gesso, but I would rather not work with such tight restrictions.

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    you should be able to find clear gesso. Three very thin and carefully applied coats should do the job

    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

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    For that purpose I'd recommend Golden's GAC 100.

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    DaveP and dbclemons thanks for the help!

    1 more quick question though for clemons, do you know if this is clear, I read about it but no where could I find a comment saying it was clear, also they recommend coats of gesso along with it so I'm not sure if this is the best idea? Or have you used it before without the gesso. I would just go buy it right away I'm just short on budget so I can experiment to much.

    Two coats of GAC 100 before gessoing will substantially reduce linseed oil penetration into the canvas fibers. If stiffness and oil-blocking are desired, apply a coat of GAC 400 to both the front and back, directly into the raw canvas, followed by one coat of GAC 100 onto the front of the canvas. Follow this by the desired number of gesso coats.

    GAC POLYMER INDIVIDUAL PRODUCT DESCRIPTIONS

    Use the below descriptions to decide which attributes are best-suited for a particular application:

    GAC 100: Universal Acrylic Polymer / S.I.D. Blocker / Most Flexible GAC Polymer.

    This polymer is one of the most universal used in paint manufacturing. Artists who had used "Rhoplex" (a registered trade name) will find that this GAC most closely reflects the properties to which they were accustomed.
    The GAC 100 is a useful polymer for protecting against Support Induced Discoloration (S.I.D.).
    The most flexible with a moderate level of tack and gloss.
    Useful for diluting and extending colors, especially when film flexibility and integrity are important characteristics.
    Wets pigment surfaces well. The most ideal for artists formulating their own paints.

    I wish they stated the color or clearness of it! Maybe I'll just stick with the clear gesso that Dave stated, I'll have to do some shopping tomorrow, it sucks living in the boons its hard to get to the art store alot!

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    The GAC 100 goes on slightly milky like other acrylics but will dry clear. They recommend it beneath acrylic primer since that is porous and the GAC would add a protective layer. That includes clear "gesso" also, so you'd still need the GAC in that case, or more layers of primer (3 to 4.) The reason is to avoid Surface Induced Discoloration (SID) that can come up from the wood and stain the paint surface. Priming isn't required if you use GAC. I'd suggest waiting a few days for it to dry completely before adding oils to it so all the water evaporates properly. If you varnish it later, use a spirit varnish that works with both acrylic and oil.


    There are other things that could be used also, like shellac or rabbit skin glue, but the GAC might be the simplest for you to use.

    Last edited by dbclemons; January 20th, 2009 at 09:15 PM. Reason: clarity
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    sounds great dbclemons thanks for the detailed description this really helps!

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