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Thread: How clearly can you imagine your drawings before you draw them?

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    How clearly can you imagine your drawings before you draw them?

    Hi! I'm a 16 year old noob who likes to draw. I've got some problems drawing from my mind. When I draw my mind is usually blank and I don't have any images in my head whatsoever, so I end up experimenting on paper which isn't really the thing I'm after. Then when I go to bed, the images start popping into my head>. Do you have the ability to capture your imagination on paper? Did it come naturally or did you have to practise it? How did you practise it and for how long? Am I driving you mad with these questions?
    Waiting to get answers soon
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    What are you trying to draw? Put down the pencil and try to imagine what you want. Try putting it into words in your head, or try consciously to imagine what it looks like. If your doing a concept for a warrior, for example, and having problems with his costume, try to think about how his costume works, how it wraps around his body. Does his armour look like a roman legionary's? Does he have big puffy clothes? Does he have a helmet? Is it ornate with lots of detail, or is it plain and practical? Does he have a sword or an axe or a bow? Is his weapon big or small? etc....

    If you're trying to create a full illustration with a beautiful scenery and multiple figures, you need to think even bigger. You might even want to pick up your pencil again and do some small thumbnail sketches. Where is this scene? Indoors? In the mountains? What's happening? Is it serene, or is it dramatic? Who's trying to do what? Who is important? How much of the action do you want to show, do you want the viewer to understand exactly what's going on, or do you want it to be sublime? Is there going to be much light, or is it night? Do you want a closeup of the people or is it a far shot? Etc, etc, etc....

    Draw some quick sketches. Does it work? Do you want to change something? Does the picture need more detail, or do you want to make it more plain?

    And finally, if you're in bed and you get a perfectly clear image in your mind, get up and do a sketch, or write the idea down. Maybe it's a keeper.
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    You need the technical ability first. If I can’t draw what I wanted I find a good soak in the bath while redrawing it in my head helps.
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    Obtain 3 markers, 1 20% grey, 1 30% grey, 1 black
    Obtain 1 pen, prismacolor will do

    Make shapes with the lightest colored grey marker sort of in the form or what you are going for, either humanoid, vehicle, entire scene, etc. Take pen, dont worry about persepective, anatomy etc. Draw what you think you see out of your blocked in goo. If you do this a few times, then something you think is cool comes out of it use it. What came out of your mind is now on paper and you can use it the same way you would use a photo for reference to refine and detail.

    Hope that helps.


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    To within 95% or so on most pieces...
    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
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    its crazy how clear u can see ur drawings laying quietly in the night, thats usually where i do all my thinking for the drawings the next day, i try to just get the gist of it all. the detail will come after i lay down the ground work. and alot of improvising.
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    Maybe first check out if you can draw images you see in reality. If not then drawing from mind also won't give you good results.
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    Most people don't imagine with anywhere near as much detail as they think they do. When you are trying to draw and coming up with blanks, it's most likely because you don't have a big enough internal reference file to work from. Instead you are stuck trying to make very specific marks on the paper to get only a vague idea across. The more you fill your brain with good and accurate details to draw from, the better your images will be, and the easier it will be to come come up with idea. This is done by studying things that relate to the things you'd like to draw. For example, if you love fantasy, research actual armors. Don't just look at them, but STUDY them. How do they go together? What covers what, and where are the fastenings? The more you know, the easier it is to draw, and the easier it is to come up with your own variation that will look good because it's based on understanding.

    Any serious art you want to do, should start with an information gathering session. If you just need to draw to practice and get better than pick a topic and kill two birds with one stone.
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    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=141354
    heres a similar thread i started
    And also Its been awhile since i made that thread after all the practice i can imagine things much better than before, so just draw and it will come.





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    Try zooming into the details of your picture in your mind. Takes a bit of practice at first.
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    yes the zooming in thing is a good idea, also shut ur eyes when u do it and really try to see it clearly....

    its crazy how the brain can render an entire scene, like in dreams, with perfect lighing, perspective, color... its like the brain knows all the rules already. if only we can tap into that and take a snapshot

    maybe in the future we wont have artist.. and drawing with ur hand with any medium will seem ancient, artist will be instead called imaginist... these peoples job function is solely to imagine characters, scenes, even movies in their head, and display it on a monitor to use as conceptual art or assets. who knows! it could be limitless
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    I have no problems imagining a painting in detail; whenever I do that my work usually turns out 95% the way I wanted it to look. But that does NOT necessarily make a good painting for me. Many of my works are rather mediocre for my standards, even if they turned out "right"; and I'm always trying to beat myself. Which is getting harder and harder.
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    Zoni-- Great topic!

    riceface-- I'm glad I'm not the only one that notion occurred to. Imagine how fascinating that would be! Too bad the brain fills in so many gaps with memories and expectations. The "screenshot" might be very vague, filled with the brain's personal data compression. Meaning that only one individual can fill the "gaps" to make it an actual "image" perhaps... but that's me speculating with only an intro to psychology course to my credit. In theory it's so fun to think about!
    And oh man, imagine if people could take whole videos of their dreams! :-D

    Black Spot-- I was just going to suggest the same thing. I find I can zoom in anywhere and plan out an immensely detailed piece, without the ability to see all of the detail perfectly at once. Frustrating.


    Ok, now for my own bit of advice: write down your idea. It may seem hard at first, but if you like to write (like me) you might find it valuable. Try planning out the composition in words, and describe the scene just as a poet or descriptive novelist would. Then depict what you wrote as an illustration. It might help hone in on your imagination visualization skills.

    Finally, a "photographic imagination" isn't really required for successful art. In his first boss monster video, Andrew Jones said he really can't imagine what his final image would or should look like. If you take a look at his work you can't really say it's hindered him.
    What's more important is being able to decide whether what you put on your paper is working or not, and just choose what works.
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