Having probelms with anatomy/poses

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  1. #1
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    Post Having probelms with anatomy/poses

    Ive noticed a few things about almost all of my artwork, the poses (among other things) doesn't give off the feeling of energy I want it to and then it ends up looking like crap. Another thing is anatomy, no matter how much I study and practise, the bodies don't come out the way I want them to. Here's an example Name:  Comparison.jpg
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    In the second picture, his knees are way to low, his right arm (or the left, depending on how you look at it) looks very static and isn't doing anything. Those are just typical things I've noticed, anything else you find odd or out of place, let me know.


    So my real question is, what kinds of exercises should I do in order to improve on anatomy ?

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  3. #2
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    posemaniacs.com try it outttt

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  5. #3
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    Exercises to improve anatomy:

    Figure drawing, short poses, long poses, super short poses. (classes are nice)
    Using reference photos, even if they're of yourself. (see gratuitous example a below)
    Looking an anatomy book.
    Skeletal study.

    Solution:

    Stop trying to stylize and just keep at it.

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  7. #4
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    Hey Nick, you need to really understand the gesture, proportions and basic 3d forms of the figure and how they are connected first. If those are off, the anatomy and everything else will be off too.
    “Until you can learn to ignore details, you won’t learn to draw.“
    - Fred Fixler

    When you are saying you study and practice, what exactly are you doing?

    You are a level 8 ninja and even though you have a lot of weapons sometimes your ninja moves are your most powerful.
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  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silvertone View Post
    When you are saying you study and practice, what exactly are you doing?
    What I do is I have daily sketches , I usually use photos as a reference for poses and anatomy, other than that, I just doodle or paint in Photoshop.

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  9. #6
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    This might sound cheesy, butit has helped me in the past. Try drawing the action as a stick figure first. In fact, just draw stick figures and work hard on them to perfect the action poses and anatomical proportions. Then flesh them out.

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  10. #7
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    I'm not sure if you are into comic book art or if you just want to draw realistic figures but one of the most helpful things for me, recently, was to look up artists on you tube and watch them draw. I strongly recomend you look up Jim Lee, he has a number of videos and you can see how loose his work starts out. Other than that it is just practise, practise, practise!

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  11. #8
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    Drawing from life is really where it's at. From photos is good too I think if you approach it the same way as a real figure, In other words, thinking around, back, behind and through the forms in the image.

    If you haven't already, try taking a sketchbook somewhere people are sitting around not moving. Try to draw them. You will immediately notice how different it is drawing from life compared to a photograph.

    Some things I did when working from magazine or book photos before I got the chance for figure drawing would be taking a sheet of tracing paper over the photo and drawing the pose in different gestural ways over it, draw the figure only as boxes or cylinders, a simplified skeleton and then the muscles over that.

    Also, I always heard about correct proportions so with tracing paper I would go over the photo and measure all the different ways to check proportions. For example, counting heads down the length of the figure, measuring the top of the head to crotch and seeing if that was indeed the halfway point.

    For heads I'd draw a simple egg shape over the picture of the head, do all the proportion divisions and see if the features on the photo fell into place.

    This helped me not to just copy the photo but analyze and understand it gesturally, 3 dimensionally, and anatomically.

    For figure invention you need a simplified rough version of a figure that you can put down very fast. Could be a stick figure, silhouette, scribble, etc.

    This is where you can tell early if you have a successful pose, meaning the action reads well and it has proper balance...and, you like it! Put that down and make sure all your proportions are correct, counting and measuring seems weird at first but you'll eventually get to eyeballing it. I'll still measure and count with my fingers if I'm the slightest bit unsure. You may have to make small changes in this initial pass but at this stage it's much easier and not a big deal to change since you haven't put much time (detail) into it. Now that your proportions are right on you can start building up your figure.

    And like shirtz man said, practice, practice, practice.

    Hope that helps some!

    You are a level 8 ninja and even though you have a lot of weapons sometimes your ninja moves are your most powerful.
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  13. #9
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    You need to spend a good deal of time learning to draw human figure as it is- pose, gestures, anatomy, proportion, the works- before you can start stylizing to this degree. You seem to be going for an anime style, but keep in mind that the good mangaka first train in traditional art before applying the style. (Note: Not all mangaka do this. You can easily spot the ones that dont because their art looks like crap). For getting energy and life into your poses, I'd suggest doing a lot of studies from Bridgman (http://www.amazon.com/Bridgmans-Comp...1318794&sr=8-1) and Loomis (http://www.fineart.sk/index.php?s=0&cat=12) to start with.

    -Sid

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  15. #10
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    Also, when photographing yourself as reference, try not to knock anybody over in your immediate vicinity whilst acting out dynamic action poses.

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    You are a level 8 ninja and even though you have a lot of weapons sometimes your ninja moves are your most powerful.
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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silvertone View Post
    Also, when photographing yourself as reference, try not to knock anybody over in your immediate vicinity whilst acting out dynamic action poses.
    Ahhaha. Yeah....

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  17. #12
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    I started reading Successful Drawing, by Andrew Loomis...I think is distributed for free and seems well written, I suggest you to get this book.

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