Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 114
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    (Split off from the Accepted Portfolios thread)

    im completely new to the art landscape.........im gonna apply to ringling, as an international undergradutae....and im basically looking for any helpor tips as i can get.....

    help meeee...pleease
    Last edited by Elwell; December 25th, 2008 at 01:26 PM.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    178
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Quick question: So I will graduate high school with around a ~2.5GPA +/-. How terrible is that? What is the point where they look at your GPA and laugh at you? Will I need something much higher? Should I go to a community college as suggested in an earlier thread to get some of the english/math/etc courses out of the way to try and raise my GPA?

    Help is appreciated.

    - Adam

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,540
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 271 Times in 199 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by AdamR View Post
    Quick question: So I will graduate high school with around a ~2.5GPA +/-. How terrible is that? What is the point where they look at your GPA and laugh at you? Will I need something much higher? Should I go to a community college as suggested in an earlier thread to get some of the english/math/etc courses out of the way to try and raise my GPA?

    Help is appreciated.

    - Adam
    2.5 is bad, but won't instantly disqualify you at most places. You may as well send in applications this year; if you don't get accepted, got to a community college to raise your GPA.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,084
    Thanks
    3,169
    Thanked 1,271 Times in 919 Posts
    i've been afraid of how much my gpa will ding me too.
    it's probably 2.5>. ;_;

    would a very strong portfolio tip the scales in my favor?

    or would that bad gpa tell them that i won't be able to handle the curriculum, regardless of skill? ORZ

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    366
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 45 Times in 37 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by a la bapsi View Post
    i've been afraid of how much my gpa will ding me too.
    it's probably 2.5>. ;_;

    would a very strong portfolio tip the scales in my favor?

    or would that bad gpa tell them that i won't be able to handle the curriculum, regardless of skill? ORZ
    You're portfolio is the most important thing, so I imagine it will help you if you have a strong one.

    On a related note, I'd like to take another opportunity to state how disgusted I am that art schools place any significant attention on GPA's to begin with.
    That is all.
    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    178
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    On a related note, I'd like to take another opportunity to state how disgusted I am that art schools place any significant attention on GPA's to begin with.
    Well I mean I can clearly see why they'd take it as important, because it is. I'm not gonna try and kid anyone, I've been a huge slack of school ever since I started the damn thing and it's clearly reflected in my GPA.

    If you owned a college would you accept students who had a pretty good ability to draw but no strength, will power, or dedication to do well in your school?

    I had no intentions of going from high school to community college to another university but hey. I wanted to play Counter-Strike instead of doing my Physics homework lol

    It is an art school, after all.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    366
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 45 Times in 37 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by AdamR View Post
    Well I mean I can clearly see why they'd take it as important, because it is. I'm not gonna try and kid anyone, I've been a huge slack of school ever since I started the damn thing and it's clearly reflected in my GPA.

    If you owned a college would you accept students who had a pretty good ability to draw but no strength, will power, or dedication to do well in your school?

    I had no intentions of going from high school to community college to another university but hey. I wanted to play Counter-Strike instead of doing my Physics homework lol

    It is an art school, after all.
    Here's the thing, you don't obtain the ability to draw well without strength, power, or dedication. So if you can draw well, than you already posses those traits.

    If I ran my own art school, I would place my importance of acceptance by these percentages: 95% for portolio, 4% essay and 1% everything else.
    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,540
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 271 Times in 199 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    Here's the thing, you don't obtain the ability to draw well without strength, power, or dedication. So if you can draw well, than you already posses those traits.
    Sure you can. You need a degree of passion, but that doesn't necessarily give you the ability to function in an academic or corporate environment.

    A school doesn't want a student who sketches a lot but routinely decides he has no interest in completing the assigned work.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    59
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    You're portfolio is the most important thing, so I imagine it will help you if you have a strong one.

    On a related note, I'd like to take another opportunity to state how disgusted I am that art schools place any significant attention on GPA's to begin with.
    That is all.
    It's good to know if a student is willing to go to class every day and work hard even if it's not skill related. There are usually going to be lectures (art history and writing, for example) and you will need to be able to succeed in those just as much as your skill-based classes.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    366
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 45 Times in 37 Posts
    In response to Meloncov and Jackie57,

    Alright, so it's important that a student attend classes and complete projects. Ensuring this is not a problem. You simply flunk the student and/or strip them of their financial aid if they do not adhere to the curriculum. Somehow I think the threat of that action alone will motivate most students to finish the assignments.

    None of the potential problems that exist when you accept a student with a low GPA come anywhere near the problem of having a student who is bad at their major. No, art history and writing are not as important to an animator as animating (in terms of being a successful professional animator). You're skill-based classes are more important because that is what you will get hired for - you're skill. No animation studio is going to look at a thesis film and say "Gee, the animation is stunning... but are they familiar with 17th century Italian architecture?"
    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,540
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 271 Times in 199 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post

    Alright, so it's important that a student attend classes and complete projects. Ensuring this is not a problem. You simply flunk the student and/or strip them of their financial aid if they do not adhere to the curriculum. Somehow I think the threat of that action alone will motivate most students to finish the assignments.
    Understandably, schools would prefer not to accept people they are going to flunk. Bad for their reputation, bad for student moral, frustrating for teachers.

    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    None of the potential problems that exist when you accept a student with a low GPA come anywhere near the problem of having a student who is bad at their major. No, art history and writing are not as important to an animator as animating (in terms of being a successful professional animator). You're skill-based classes are more important because that is what you will get hired for - you're skill. No animation studio is going to look at a thesis film and say "Gee, the animation is stunning... but are they familiar with 17th century Italian architecture?"
    Of course not. But that knowledge of seventeenth century Italian architecture will likely induce an increased richness and verisimilitude in, say, the backgrounds for your animation. More generally speaking, the ability to communicate artistically is useless if you have little to say.


    Also, computer animation requires more left-brain intelligence than is needed to create a good enough drawing to get accepted at almost any art school. Grades aren't a perfect indicator of left-brain intelligence, but they are likely the best the school is going to get. This is why Ringling's GPA cutoff is lower for CA than the other majors (at least officially. Unofficially, it is likely because they can afford to be more picky.)

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    detroit, michigan
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    In response to Meloncov and Jackie57,

    Alright, so it's important that a student attend classes and complete projects. Ensuring this is not a problem. You simply flunk the student and/or strip them of their financial aid if they do not adhere to the curriculum. Somehow I think the threat of that action alone will motivate most students to finish the assignments.

    None of the potential problems that exist when you accept a student with a low GPA come anywhere near the problem of having a student who is bad at their major. No, art history and writing are not as important to an animator as animating (in terms of being a successful professional animator). You're skill-based classes are more important because that is what you will get hired for - you're skill. No animation studio is going to look at a thesis film and say "Gee, the animation is stunning... but are they familiar with 17th century Italian architecture?"

    Most art schools require a hefty chunk of liberal arts classes. They're there for a reason. Maybe that animation studio won't read your thesis, but if they're doing an animation taking place in a 17th century Italian church and you have knowledge about it, you're not going to be scolded.

    Wouldn't you want to be able to think critically rather than just animate projects mindlessly?

    And hey, I'm not bashing, I got a 2.7 in highschool and went right to Arizona State University. I flunked out. I had to come back to community college and learn how to be a good student, even in my art classes. I agree, highschool was a waste of time for me, but it created a BAD HABIT in me of being a poor student. I didn't know how to study, I didn't know how to write papers, and I didn't know how to discipline myself to do projects that I didn't like. This carried over to all my studio classes at first, despite the fact that ability wise, I was at the top of my class.

    After 3 years I finally have overcome my bad habits and am applying to art schools. If I tried to go to art school fresh out of highschool, I would have gotten no where.

    Now everyone is different. What applies to me probably doesn't apply to most people, but to discount the importance of studying other subjects besides animation is just ignorant.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
    Personally, I would like to go to a college in which most people have a gpa within close proximity to 3.0 (at least) and know how to draw.
    My sketchbook. Input and advice is, well, appreciated. :] http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=118556

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    59
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    In response to Meloncov and Jackie57,

    Alright, so it's important that a student attend classes and complete projects. Ensuring this is not a problem. You simply flunk the student and/or strip them of their financial aid if they do not adhere to the curriculum. Somehow I think the threat of that action alone will motivate most students to finish the assignments.

    None of the potential problems that exist when you accept a student with a low GPA come anywhere near the problem of having a student who is bad at their major. No, art history and writing are not as important to an animator as animating (in terms of being a successful professional animator). You're skill-based classes are more important because that is what you will get hired for - you're skill. No animation studio is going to look at a thesis film and say "Gee, the animation is stunning... but are they familiar with 17th century Italian architecture?"
    I meant that they are just as important to succeed in during school. You have to pass those classes to stay at the school.

    For instance, at Ringling, the History of Animation class is considered a kind of "weed out" class. It's quite demanding and requires a lot of studying.

    Not only that, but how can you really say that knowledge isn't as important as your skill? A pretty thesis isn't the only thing that gets you a job.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    366
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 45 Times in 37 Posts
    (Sorry, I had to make a triple post because my computer wont make a post if it is too long.)

    If a school adopted my philosophy on accepting students, I doubt there would be much of a problem at all with students flunking out.
    Let's take Bobby here, his portfolio is excellent, essay well crafted and insightful, but GPA shows he wasn't too keen on diagramming sentences. We tell him he's accepted on the condition that he attend and pass his classes. What is the probability that he's going to fail? In my mind, not very high.

    Let's take Lucy here, she can't draw a straight line, essay is cliché and boring, but GPA shows she memorized the formula chart in her math book. How good of an art student is she going to be? In my mind, not a very good one. Meloncov, don't you think she’s going to make her Illustration teacher frustrated? Lower the student moral? Give the art school a bad reputation for their art program?
    Last edited by lowercase; November 15th, 2008 at 03:09 PM.
    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?

Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 28th, 2013, 03:33 AM
  2. Art: school application portfolio, review needed
    By StarBelly in forum ART PORTFOLIO REVIEWS
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: January 2nd, 2012, 02:21 PM
  3. Game dev. school application, portfolio pictures
    By Evergrey in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: May 9th, 2011, 03:36 AM
  4. Art: some paintings for grad school application
    By steve kim in forum Finished Art
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: January 31st, 2007, 12:54 PM
  5. Is digital art in a school application a bad idea?
    By dustystylus in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: November 16th, 2003, 12:12 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Developed Actively by the makers of the Best Amazon Podcast