Wacom DTI-520 vs Cintiq 12WX
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Thread: Wacom DTI-520 vs Cintiq 12WX

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    Wacom DTI-520 vs Cintiq 12WX

    Hi All,

    Could someone shed some light on the wacom dti-520 15 inch monitor vs the cintinq 12wx ?

    Ideally yes i would love to buy the 21ux but its too expensive, the 12wx is within my budget, however i was considering the dti-520 since it has a 15 inch display, since it is larger i assume it would be better to draw on compared to the 12WX,

    would really appreciate any feedback ... Thanks

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    If you can, I'd try and look at the pressure sensitivity levels... The higher the better obviously. I would also see if you can give one of those tablets a quick test drive, but I'm not sure if there are places willing to let others try out expensive tablets. But anyways, when you test them out, see how hard you have to push to get a response, because the "monitor" you're talking about sounds like a tablet notebook.

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    I believe the Cintiq is better suited for art/graphics purposes, as the dti seems to be a bit cruder device aimed for other areas of use.

    I own a 12WX myself and its great, you should be aware though, that it has some issues;

    First of, don't be alarmed by any of this, the problems are relatively small and it greatly varies from person to person how much you are annoyed by them. I at least thought you should be aware of what you are getting yourself in to as it is a big investment. I myself was fully aware of these issues, bought it anyway and couldn't be happier . Also these problems has nothing to do with the cintiq model itself but are (most likely) something you have to deal with when it comes to screen tablets.

    There is a sheet of glass in front of the actual display that creates a little gap, which means that the cursor isn't always perfectly visually aligned with the tip of the pen and this gets worse of you view it from an angle. It can "compensate" for this if you calibrate it, but this doesn't work very well in my opinion, it's tricky to calibrate and it only works if you always view it from the position you did when you calibrated it. I actually found it easier NOT to calibrate it. If you view it normally this isn't really much of a problem, and you quickly get used to it.

    The second issue with it is that the built in screen (presumably) is causing a small interference with the pen, what this means is that even if you lay the pen completely still on the tablet the mouse pointer will "vibrate" slightly, this effect gets a little bigger closer to the edge of the screen. This does somewhat effect you when you try to draw clean lines (mostly in photoshop, other programs will produce better line quality). From what I can gather, hearing from other people, this problem varies with each cinitq (of course this can depend on how much each person is annoyed by it) but it always seems to be present. When trying to draw super clean lines in one stroke is really the only time that I've found this to be a problem, usually it doesn't effect my art and I find it very tolerable

    And one more thing, if you plan on using it as a portable tablet with a laptop be aware that there are a couple of wires to drag along with it and it will require it's own wall outlet. But used stationery they aren't (atleast for me) a problem at al.

    In conclusion I've found the advantages to outweigh the disadvantages.

    And in regards to what TheBullion24K said: The pressure sensitivity is something you can calibrate with the software (same as with any wacom tablet)

    If you or anyone else has anyquestions feel free to PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lingmerth View Post
    And in regards to what TheBullion24K said: The pressure sensitivity is something you can calibrate with the software (same as with any wacom tablet)
    I believe Bullion was referring to the Levels of Sensitivity rather than "tracking". Intuos and Cintiq have 1024 levels while the Bamboo has only 512. I've no idea what the DTI-520 has. Nice review, however. Thanks.

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    I also just bought the cintiq 12wx and would say that it is a great piece of technology. That being said, you should keep in mind that it isn't necessarily a vital piece of equipment. It most certainly is a *luxury* purchase and you would be just fine with a non-display tablet. Here are some things to consider if you are going to buy a Cintiq.

    -You will have the advantage of utilizing two displays if you didn't already have two. HOWEVER, you will need to calibrate the two monitors so they match. There are noticeable differences between my monitors and as of yet cannot get a very close match with the basic monitor controls. You may (I think likely) get markedly different color and value interpretations from both monitors. (I'm looking into some monitor calibration tools, so if somebody has any good suggestions please let me know.)

    -I find that one of the biggest flaws the cintiq has is related to its' primary feature of being able to draw directly on screen. One of the aspects of the non-display tablets that I find of greatest benefit is that your hand or pen is never obstructing your view of the image. Sure, some may think this is stupid but I never realized how nice it was to be able to work on an image without having to worry about my hand getting in the way of what I was doing until I made the switch to the cintiq. It's taking some time to get used to. The tradeoff for this is the greatly increased hand-eye coordination required by the non-display tablet.

    -You can use rulers and french curves directly on screen, which is a pretty spiffy option. The problem with this arises from the abberation of the cursur already described by Lingmerth. It seems this is likely due to electrical interference from the display. This nearly makes the option of using traditional guides (rulers, curves) useless...nearly. You will not get perfectly straight lines or nice flowing curves if you happen to be situated over one of the hotspots, which I've found to be near the edges.

    -The 12" is portable, but not in the sense that your laptop is portable. It does not have it's own battery supply so the portability aspect is only useful if you have a power source where you want to use it. Unlike the traditional non-display tablets that are usb powered and you can use anywhere you please. As said before, there is a small adaptor box on the power cord and also a hub that you need to attach your display. Very bulky and very inconvenient.

    -Lastly, (this will probably be a non-issue for most people) if you are right handed you may be annoyed by the heat generated in the bottom right portion of the tablet. You lefties got lucky here. I'm leary of electromagnetic radiation, so naturally I wonder about having all that juice pulsing through my good hand. (Paranoia? Yes, probably). In the end though, I just plain find it annoying to have my wrist resting on a source of heat. Call me crazy, but it just doesn't feel right.

    All in all, I would say I'm reasonably happy having purchased my cintiq. If I could go back in time, however, I may not be so desperate to own one of these slick pieces of machinery. The only main benefit of the cintiq is that you can draw directly onscreen. That's it. Yes it does speed things up considerably, but it by no means makes the ability of creating amazing artwork any easier to achieve. It is not a perfect system, and I think Wacom has some work to do in order to really hash out some of the problems with pen precision. If you are thinking of sinking yourself into debt just for the novelty of owning one of these, I don't think it will be the most satisfying of purchases. If you are from Canada, I ordered my product from Corel. I found they had the best prices (not just for cintiq's but also for the intuos tablets), and if you are unsatisfied with your purchase you can send it back for a full refund. They also have great bundle deals if you are interested in purchasing Corel Painter as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FunkdaFide View Post
    I also just bought the cintiq 12wx and would say that it is a great piece of technology. That being said, you should keep in mind that it isn't necessarily a vital piece of equipment. It most certainly is a *luxury* purchase and you would be just fine with a non-display tablet. Here are some things to consider if you are going to buy a Cintiq.

    -You will have the advantage of utilizing two displays if you didn't already have two. HOWEVER, you will need to calibrate the two monitors so they match. There are noticeable differences between my monitors and as of yet cannot get a very close match with the basic monitor controls. You may (I think likely) get markedly different color and value interpretations from both monitors. (I'm looking into some monitor calibration tools, so if somebody has any good suggestions please let me know.)

    -I find that one of the biggest flaws the cintiq has is related to its' primary feature of being able to draw directly on screen. One of the aspects of the non-display tablets that I find of greatest benefit is that your hand or pen is never obstructing your view of the image. Sure, some may think this is stupid but I never realized how nice it was to be able to work on an image without having to worry about my hand getting in the way of what I was doing until I made the switch to the cintiq. It's taking some time to get used to. The tradeoff for this is the greatly increased hand-eye coordination required by the non-display tablet.

    -You can use rulers and french curves directly on screen, which is a pretty spiffy option. The problem with this arises from the abberation of the cursur already described by Lingmerth. It seems this is likely due to electrical interference from the display. This nearly makes the option of using traditional guides (rulers, curves) useless...nearly. You will not get perfectly straight lines or nice flowing curves if you happen to be situated over one of the hotspots, which I've found to be near the edges.

    -The 12" is portable, but not in the sense that your laptop is portable. It does not have it's own battery supply so the portability aspect is only useful if you have a power source where you want to use it. Unlike the traditional non-display tablets that are usb powered and you can use anywhere you please. As said before, there is a small adaptor box on the power cord and also a hub that you need to attach your display. Very bulky and very inconvenient.

    -Lastly, (this will probably be a non-issue for most people) if you are right handed you may be annoyed by the heat generated in the bottom right portion of the tablet. You lefties got lucky here. I'm leary of electromagnetic radiation, so naturally I wonder about having all that juice pulsing through my good hand. (Paranoia? Yes, probably). In the end though, I just plain find it annoying to have my wrist resting on a source of heat. Call me crazy, but it just doesn't feel right.

    All in all, I would say I'm reasonably happy having purchased my cintiq. If I could go back in time, however, I may not be so desperate to own one of these slick pieces of machinery. The only main benefit of the cintiq is that you can draw directly onscreen. That's it. Yes it does speed things up considerably, but it by no means makes the ability of creating amazing artwork any easier to achieve. It is not a perfect system, and I think Wacom has some work to do in order to really hash out some of the problems with pen precision. If you are thinking of sinking yourself into debt just for the novelty of owning one of these, I don't think it will be the most satisfying of purchases. If you are from Canada, I ordered my product from Corel. I found they had the best prices (not just for cintiq's but also for the intuos tablets), and if you are unsatisfied with your purchase you can send it back for a full refund. They also have great bundle deals if you are interested in purchasing Corel Painter as well.
    ---------------------------

    hey im not sure how long ago u posted this but i thought i would ask on the point of the heat issue wouldnt the glove help that u can buy help? i wanna buy a cintiq 12wx soon -about november 2009- and am trying to get as much help as possible
    as for the abberation of the cursor on the edges of the screen, should i be wary of that when buying one?
    thanx in advance

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    Using a glove made of thick fabric in order to keep heat away? Sorry, but that's not gonna happen.

    Thanks for everyone in this thread posting their reviews. I was 90% sure to get a 12WX, but now with all that objective criticism, I think I'll put the cash on a new computer rather than spending it on toy like the Cintiq. The heat problem and the obviously mediocre quality of the screen itself are the main points … as is the clunky power supply box, which looks like a fucking brick in most pictured reviews. (I mean look at this shit!)

    Another point to remember: The new Intuos4 tablets are the most elaborate products WACOM has released in years. Using an Int3, I think the leap to Int4 was huge. I just tested an Int4 today and gotta say I'm impressed by it's haptics and the new key layout and wheel. Pure bliss and absolutely worth the cash.

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    Interesting stuff. The dti 520 is probably ancient by today's advancements but I still think it does the job. Good point raised by getting a better rig first.



    Depends on what type of work that you want to get into but you can still get away from using either. I'd say the cintiq 12wx is still too small for its price.

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