Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 18

Thread: I've gotta improve drawing from observation. FAST.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    83
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    I've gotta improve drawing from observation. FAST.

    I want to improve my drawing from real-life (need to beef up my portfolio. All you guys's awesome art makes me feel terrible about mine. D=). Can anybody tell me of some good books or something that could give me some tips?
    Currently I'm working with "Drawing on the Right Side of The Brain".
    Anybody got any other good books that could help? =)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,119
    Thanks
    148
    Thanked 503 Times in 314 Posts
    Why not just finish one, then ask?

    Or find some sticky, there's plenty around that say the same stuff everyone says here all the time. Loomis, Bridgman, practice practice practice. Rinse and repeat.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    To paraphrase a muppet: "There is no fast, there is only do."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Mirana For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,090
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 970 Times in 520 Posts
    Seriously, read probably any 5 random threads here and likely one of them will be someone asking this exact same question. If you can't find your answer in a forum you are already reading, then a book isn't going to help. You've probably read all of the advice you need. What you need is practice so you can understand the advice you've probably already read. Or the patience to read what's in front of you rather than thinking you can improve FAST. You can improve fast, but the people who do are drawing, not looking for a book to give them a shortcut.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to J Wilson For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Around
    Posts
    862
    Thanks
    229
    Thanked 227 Times in 141 Posts
    Frankly, the only way to get better at drawing from life is to just do it - a lot. It's a process of quick digestion where all that by the moment visual information gets digested and shot to your hand that you can only develop through practice.

    In my experience, it relies on your hand knowing how to react and your brain knowing what remember. Efficiency! Practice! etc.
    MY SKETCHBOOK IS AWESOME
    karmiclychee.net

    EAT EARTH, DIG DEEP, DRINK WATER, GO TO SLEEP, YOU SHOULD NOT BE WAKING.
    Peepul: Tulokyn :: Nakhon :: Deadlyhazard :: raminafshafari
    :: Mr. Magic
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    83
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    Seriously, read probably any 5 random threads here and likely one of them will be someone asking this exact same question. If you can't find your answer in a forum you are already reading, then a book isn't going to help. You've probably read all of the advice you need. What you need is practice so you can understand the advice you've probably already read. Or the patience to read what's in front of you rather than thinking you can improve FAST. You can improve fast, but the people who do are drawing, not looking for a book to give them a shortcut.
    I don't want a shortcut... What I want is tips. Serious tips. Because I try to draw what I see, I really do, but I always end up unsatisfied. I feel like I'm missing something. I really don't know what it or they may be, but I'm not doing something properly... =(
    I think it may be my process... But I just don't know...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,774
    Thanks
    768
    Thanked 769 Times in 340 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DDar View Post
    I really don't know what it or they may be, but I'm not doing something properly... =(
    Don't worry about that. Quit trying to make every drawing a masterpiece. You're going to screw up. You can't change that. Just DRAW. That's all it takes. If you don't like how a drawing looks, either change it or move on to something else. As long as you learn something, no matter how small, it's worth it.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,119
    Thanks
    148
    Thanked 503 Times in 314 Posts
    Exactly how many of these drawings have you done? It'll be a long time before you'll be satisfied with something you draw.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    528
    Thanks
    409
    Thanked 215 Times in 141 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by RyerOrdStar View Post
    Exactly how many of these drawings have you done? It'll be a long time before you'll be satisfied with something you draw.
    QFT. When I was in school, one of my professors told us that 90% of our stuff will be junk. It's the 10% that will be amazing. This applies whether for art in general or graphic design (aka designing logos, etc...) Even now, when I sketch or doodle for ideas, it's the few images that pop out at me. I tend to do a warm-up just to get the crap out first.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    791
    Thanks
    423
    Thanked 295 Times in 144 Posts
    There's so many forms of drawing from real life. You are questioning your process in your previous post but hasn't specified what you're actually doing; there's huge differences between a 30 second gesture to a 2 hour conte drawing.

    I'm going to have to be vague here since I'm not sure what you're having trouble with when drawing life. There are many aspects to improve upon for your observational drawings. Similar to the typical stats in a video game like strength, agility, and stamina, you have to train different aspects of your mind and body (gesture, structure, speed, etc...) in order to become better at it, an improved version of yourself. I guess what I'm trying to say is that if you want to improve faster (which is what you want, right?), you should not only practice a lot, but practice in a variety of different ways.

    My personal training tip is to go out to a cafe, subway, or other public spaces and sketch a crapload of people and how they act. Draw quick ones on people who are moving a lot, and more established ones if the person is reading a book or generally staying still. The reason why this is such excellent practice because, at any moment, your subject may move and may even leave. This exercise improves your speed on how fast your mind processes a subject and, most importantly, you train to analyze and you will start to interpret and simplify structure to your own preference; getting the important things down quickly. The best part is that you can do this in your spare time without the reliance of the more formal life drawing sessions, which may not happen every single day of the week.

    Read up on Loomis and Bridgman also to get tips on how to observe the human body but you still got to practice like crazy.
    Last edited by Alex Chow; December 10th, 2008 at 01:50 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Alex Chow For This Useful Post:


  15. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DDar View Post
    I feel like I'm missing something.
    You are. You're missing YEARS OF DRAWING. Thus, DRAW MORE. There is no secret, there is no fast track, there is only practice.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    83
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by RyerOrdStar View Post
    Exactly how many of these drawings have you done? It'll be a long time before you'll be satisfied with something you draw.
    As of late, I've been drawing for at LEAST an hour every day. I mostly work with "Drawing With the Right Side of The Brain", but I also try and draw what's around me. Mostly my classmates. Sometimes the trees that are outside the window. But everything comes out wrong, the people I draw rarely look like the actual person I'm drawing.
    And while it's true that I'm missing the years of drawing that most of you have probably already had, I'm still 18. That's probably not much of an excuse to alot of you, but I just realized that this is what I want to do with my life. I feel confident in saying that I'm passionate about this, and I really want to improve.
    Everyone needs some tips, don't they? Like, say you want to improve strength in a game. You have to know where the enemies that give strength experience ARE, you know?
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DDar View Post
    You have to know where the enemies that give strength experience ARE, you know?
    .......what?

    We ARE giving you a tip: that is TO DRAW. The theory you read in books is not suddenly going to make you the awesome artist able to reproduce likenesses at will. DRAWING MORE will.

    Only an hr a day? Seriously? When I was a kid it was ALL I did. Before school, during school (it helped me remember lectures better instead of nodding off), after school and loooong after I was supposed to be in bed. I used to start a piece in the afternoon/evening and stay up all night into the next morning until it was done. Then I'd go straight to school...haha.

    Point is, getting better faster requires drawing more. One hr a day is not enough for that. THERE IS NO SHORTCUT.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. SketchBook: Rissa Kay's Gotta Improve!! ((Updated 10/14!))
    By RissaKay in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 101
    Last Post: October 21st, 2013, 05:02 PM
  2. SketchBook: Gotta go fast
    By Marchen in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: July 6th, 2013, 05:31 PM
  3. Need to improve this, fast:D
    By v3gar in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: December 23rd, 2012, 11:13 AM
  4. SketchBook: Gotta improve.... Fast !
    By bubblesaw in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: September 11th, 2010, 07:08 PM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: January 28th, 2006, 11:50 PM

Members who have read this thread: 6

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook