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Thread: Terrible Two

  1. #1
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    Terrible Two

    So, my son has some nice over-sized, generic legos and he knows how to build with them. Yet, the only enjoyment he gets from them is throwing them. He goes to the highest chair and throws it over, as hard, and far as he can. He's getting pretty good at it. Maybe someday he'll like baseball. Anyway, he's not even two yet, and it seems he's getting a head start in acting horribly. And he still can't speak. Any tips on when this is going to end?

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  3. #2
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    Sometimes...you gotta make it end for it to end quickly, that's what I learned with my li'l brother. >_< He liked using a plastic hammer on people's fingers... It could be a phase until the next interesting thing happens, or one day you'll get fed up from your son throwing legos (or whatever else if he moves on from them), grab that lego out his hand and...lay down the law in a way that is possibly different from my way. I'm mean.

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    In his thirties.

    Seriously though, two and three are about self awareness and testing boundaries. Also the great Id - as far as a toddler is concerned, they are the center of the universe(which is kinda true).

    Note, I'm not a parent, just an ex babysitter and aunt seven times over. And different things work for different kids, depending on the WHY.

    He could feel like he's not getting enough attention, all the way to performing a social experiment to see just how far he can push. Every kid is a little scientist, and the whole world is brand new.

    Kids will say and do things that seem completely bizarre and illogical - when you have a fuller world view. When you look at things from their point of view, the statement or action tends to make more sense. (I have the luxury of being an observer, rather than the focus, so I've had the time to think about it.)

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    Just say, "No", if he does it again, put them away and stick cotton wool in your ears. You have to be firm if you want him to learn even if you have go through that screaming match - it won't last but you must ignore it not matter what.

    I liked mine when they were two, three was a different matter.

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  8. #5
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    My cousin's kid is almost two.. she "fixates" on things, be it picking up leaf after leaf and handing it to someone or making the same noises over and over again. I know nothing about young children, but they all do some pretty weird stuff in one way or another.

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    Have fun with that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Psypomp View Post
    My cousin's kid is almost two.. she "fixates" on things, be it picking up leaf after leaf and handing it to someone or making the same noises over and over again. I know nothing about young children, but they all do some pretty weird stuff in one way or another.
    That is swet behaviour. You say, "Thank you", and when her back is turned dispose of them quickly and tell you ate them and might be feeling sick. The reactions are funny.

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  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    Any tips on when this is going to end?
    The day you do to him what he does to his legos...
    What?

    Blackspot im not sure what it is you call a swet behaviour and a wacom volitio?


    a'right ill leave the lounge...

    Last edited by SM; December 8th, 2008 at 03:36 PM.
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    Sweet - I spel gud. A volitio is pre bamboo, but that was in a different thread and I call it Tiny.

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    At two, my niece found out that giving people treats and food would give her gratitude and attention. She started with taking one and one potatochip from a bowl and go the round. Later it was stuff at dinner. It came so far she would go to the kitchen and find somewhat edible stuff to give away.

    It's all experimenting, mostly to find out how the world around works. We managed to get her to understand that there was something like "too much", which was a huge improvement on most things

    She also loved to build huge lego towers and then we crashed it. Totally. Smashed it to bits and pieces. Then we picked all up and did it over again. Without all the bang and clang and noise, I don't think she'd bothered with the towers. It was the anticipation of ruining it afterwards that was the "awsome". It's how they get into our world.

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  14. #11
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    Andrew's discovered the potatochip trick and the tower stacking. They somehow pale in comparison to the lego throwing...

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    my uncle's kid decided he didn't like the family cat....
    so he stabbed it in its back leg with a power drill.
    later, after the cat recovered, he slammed its head in a door over and over again.
    after it recovered from that... you get the picture.
    the kid is fucked in the head.
    i think he's going to be a serial killer.

    moral of the story: dont let your kid throw legos at cats...

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  17. #13
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    We don't have a cat, although I'd like one. Some nights, though, he'll grab his pillow and put it over my head. Like last night, and he has the craziest, calm look on his face when he does it.

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