Constructing/approaching a drawing

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    180
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 17 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Constructing/approaching a drawing

    Hopefully this isn't too vague a question.. I'm just curious as to best practises when it comes to making the first marks on your page when you're drawing something in front of you..

    I've been drawing for about 2 years now, but I still haven't found a style/method when I sketch. I'm pretty happy now with how I begin portraits or a stand-alone facial features because I find it easy to describe the face using tone/shadows.. and I spend nearly all of my time - when drawing - studying the face and the body... but say I wanted to draw this picture of a t-rex..

    Constructing/approaching a drawing

    ..I'm sitting here with my blank page, and I can't interpret this how I would somebody's face, a pair of lips or a nose.. I don't want to render the t-rex until I'm pretty happy that I have the body blocked out nice and loosely on my page and everything is in proportion.. but where do I even begin? I really don't like to use outline... If I'm drawing a pair of lips I'll tilt my pencil and rough in the shadow of the upper lip usually, and then bring out the bottom lip with some more shadow.. but with this picture I don't see this as an option, the shadow-to-light ratio seems far more complicated?

    The t-rex is only one example of something I want to draw but don't know where to start.. I guess it applies to any sort of object I want to draw from life, or any other type of animal.. why do I find it not too much of a problem to draw good parts of a face but can't structure this t-rex?

    Any advice?

    Last edited by Pau1Winslow; December 7th, 2008 at 09:51 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Outside Toronto
    Posts
    542
    Thanks
    276
    Thanked 349 Times in 125 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Drawing something like this starts long before you attempt to draw something like this. A good fundamental education in drawing and painting allows you the skills to render the imaginative as if it were real and extant. The rule to always remember is that you go from the basic to the specific, the simple to the complex. Research would be required for this specific critter, study what we think we know about its anatomy, watch and draw from some recent dino movies to get a feel for how it moves. Get comfortable using your developed art skills to create something without it posing for you; imaginative drawing.

    Some time (months, years) later:

    Start with the composition; how the basic, most important shapes sit on the page. How the simplest lighting plays across the forms and keep developing until satisfied or the deadline requires you to stop.

    ~R

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to rpace For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,119
    Thanks
    148
    Thanked 503 Times in 314 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you're doing a painting, why does it matter if you use outlines? Many illustrators start with a very detailed line drawing before starting to paint. Dos Santos, James Jean, to name a few.

    If you're absolutely bent on using shading, then just shade where you want the shadows to be on a general blocky shape, for example a cylinder on the ribcage of the rex.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    180
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 17 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I appreciate both your replies.

    Quote Originally Posted by RyerOrdStar View Post
    If you're doing a painting, why does it matter if you use outlines? Many illustrators start with a very detailed line drawing before starting to paint. Dos Santos, James Jean, to name a few.
    I'm sure approaching a painting is different, I'm strictly talking about pencil-to-paper in this thread, though, mate. (Although obviously there's no this-or-that way limitation, everybody does their own thing so I'm not knocking you. I dunno, maybe approaching either is the same?). In fact after reading through William Whitaker's portrait painting tutorial I probably would brush on some outlines first if I were painting. With drawing, though, I find that I can describe form far better by roughing in shadows rather than lines.

    Quote Originally Posted by rpace View Post
    Drawing something like this starts long before you attempt to draw something like this. A good fundamental education in drawing and painting allows you the skills to render the imaginative as if it were real and extant. The rule to always remember is that you go from the basic to the specific, the simple to the complex. Research would be required for this specific critter, study what we think we know about its anatomy, watch and draw from some recent dino movies to get a feel for how it moves. Get comfortable using your developed art skills to create something without it posing for you; imaginative drawing.
    Definitely, man. I'm only at the very beginning of my journey (I'm an aspiring concept artist for films) and I will definitely be getting stuck into more hands-on research like watching movies, going to museums, etc. In fact I've been trying to dig out a VHS of a dino documentary I taped a while ago for the last couple of days, I'm really interested in studying them for a while.

    For now, in this thread, I was just curious if people have a general approach that applies to all of their drawings/studies.. what part of the dino do you look at first? What comes first when you're drawing a cup? Or a chair? A bird? What end of a rose do you look at first? Etc.

    Last edited by Pau1Winslow; December 7th, 2008 at 11:09 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,675 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Big to small, general to specific, constantly refining. Continually check angles, proportions, alignments, negative shapes.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Big to small, general to specific, constantly refining. Continually check angles, proportions, alignments, negative shapes.
    And all this whilst constantly making sure those lines and shapes always buckle the paper into 'positive' and 'negative' forms.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook