extreme perspective tips?

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  1. #1
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    extreme perspective tips?

    I want to try to make some drawings with extreme perspective. As well people as scenes.

    Is it just as easy to draw things that are closest very big and make things smaller the further away they are? For me it's not that easy... my images always end up looking weird. I start with the part that is close by, but when I have to draw the rest I still draw it way too realistic in normal proportions. When I really force myself to draw the rest smaller some parts end up looking weird (for example "fat" instead of close perspective)

    Does anyone has some tips about drawing extreme perspectives?

    http://www.nancyzonneveld.nl
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  3. #2
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    Decide where your focal point is, everything else should be in lesser detail as it's not so important.

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    Hmm I guess you could try to put the horizon really low. That's pretty fucking extreme :p

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  5. #4
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    fish-eye lens type style? like when something is viewed on a shiny round object. like a convex lens. those have extreme perspective.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
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  6. #5
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    How about posting examples of your problem. Noone can read a picture.

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  7. #6
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    I made this sketch: (still very simple, but imagine the penguin jumping out of the water on to the ice ground, with some icebergs in the background)

    extreme perspective tips?

    The penguin is sliding on the ice, towards the camera/viewer. So I think it should be possible to do a crazy perspective where the belly is really close. The effect you also get with special photo camera lenses. I tried to draw the belly bigger, but I keep drawing the other parts larger too. When I really draw the rest smaller it ends up just looking weird, and not the good kind of weird.

    With the "good kind of weird extreme perspective" I mean things like:
    http://nanami-yuki.deviantart.com/ar...Red-2-67420795
    Most of the times I see feet drawing very large and the body smaller, making it look like the character is standing above you.

    But I can't figure out how big I should draw the belly and how small the rest without having it look weird.

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    hmm that example look like big feet to me, ur deviant art link

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    Nancy just do what Loomis says in "figure drawings for what its worth" and "succesful drawing".
    Fit your penguin into a box and put the box in perspective, if you're not sure about boxes in perspective check this thread=> link.

    The way you drew the belly bigger makes it look like it has some serious chest deformity; perspective is not about distorsion of one particular part of your subject but distortion of all your subject and the setting where it belongs.

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    reg. your penguin example:

    I'd try to draw rough shapes first, like a huge circle for the belly, another circle for the head etc. then I'd shift those forms around and changes sizes until I get the desired effect. and only then I'd draw the details.

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    Ive started experimenting with extreme perspectives, particularly with human form.

    Extreme proportion for me, means using extreme changes in proportion to show depth, i guess the best tip i can give from my personal experience is dont be afraid to be daring and bold with proportion as it gets further towards the vanishing point.

    Like with any drawing try not to worry about any details to start with, focus on the biggest forms first as basic shapes and decide which object is nearest to the focal point. I found if i decide the size i want the closest object to be, i can work out proportions accordingly, and if i keep it simple to begin with, i will be able to tell straight away if the image is looking right.

    Another trick i found which helped me alot, is to pick two main focal points of the image, for example.. a face, and a hand which is shown closer and therefore much bigger, draw a line between the two points to give the rough angle of your vanishing point and build around that.

    extreme perspective tips?

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