Anatomy Studies Demo: "Figure Studies"

Join 500,000+ artists on ConceptArt.Org.

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 51
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Anatomy Studies Demo: "Figure Studies"

    Last edited by Sepulverture; November 25th, 2009 at 02:36 AM.
     


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following 60 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  4. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Basic observations and positioning

    Here are some notes that help me out when I draw the figure.


    The main thing that bothers me is the proportion of the upper torso, which I lengthen to about 4 heads long.

    I included some other notes about drawing the leg too. Legs are hard to draw because of the many complex curves around them. If not done right, they will look like spaghetti.

    What helps me out on legs, is to look for the bone structure first, starting with the great trocanter (top of the upper leg joint). From there I pay attention to the direction of the knee to see how much the leg is twisting. The upper leg bone is always bowed. The direction the upper leg bone bows toward is always the direction of the knee. Next I look for how the direction of the knee relates to the direction of the feet. This way I can see a clear twist in the leg gesture and have a solid bone underneath the muscles.

    Planting the models feet to the floor is crucial for adding weight to the pose. I usually like to think of the feet as a box to help define perspective. The bottom of the feet are usually squashed by the weight of the body, where they are forced to match the shape of the ground surface. Hence, describing the floor for us.

    I've included some notes on the breast to illustrate the pectorialis underneith. The breast(fat) sits under in a comma shape which hooks around to the ribs. It forms a distinctive two overlaping forms on the side of the chest.

    Hope these will help, I'll try to go over other drawings as I find some time.

    Last edited by madster; September 16th, 2005 at 08:45 PM. Reason: Cleaning Tutorials Section.
     

  5. The Following 14 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  6. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    More Demos from head drawing class:

    Name:  11.jpg
Views: 86185
Size:  70.5 KB

    Name:  12.jpg
Views: 84394
Size:  72.0 KB

    Name:  13.jpg
Views: 83989
Size:  90.5 KB

    Name:  14.jpg
Views: 83516
Size:  76.6 KB

    Name:  15.jpg
Views: 83131
Size:  80.0 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 02:23 AM.
     

  7. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  8. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Thanks Davi,

    I use 2B or 3B. i like to have the charcoal soft enough so it feels more like painting when i apply the values.

    Head/neck demos from this week...
    Name:  16.jpg
Views: 89805
Size:  137.1 KB

    Name:  17.jpg
Views: 82199
Size:  97.8 KB

    Name:  18.jpg
Views: 81662
Size:  82.5 KB

    Name:  19.jpg
Views: 82421
Size:  84.8 KB

    Name:  20.jpg
Views: 81055
Size:  92.5 KB

    Name:  21.jpg
Views: 80939
Size:  80.8 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 02:36 AM.
     

  9. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  10. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Here are some class demo for the long pose class. The main point was to get the students to think in terms of sculpting planes with light.
    Name:  22.jpg
Views: 80589
Size:  103.9 KB

    Name:  23.jpg
Views: 79900
Size:  74.1 KB

    Name:  24.jpg
Views: 79509
Size:  71.4 KB

    Name:  25.jpg
Views: 79111
Size:  70.0 KB

    Name:  26.jpg
Views: 79201
Size:  118.3 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 02:40 AM.
     

  11. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  12. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Learning Foundations and Priorities

    This is from a reply letter I wrote today for a possible student who wanted to know how I teach my class before they signed up. I think the info below will help answer questions about thoughts on learning priorities and procedures.
    I break it down this way so the students will have a stepping stone to build and re-enforce their skills upon. Something to make the learning process more managable.
    Each stepping stone is there to help you build your skills for the next. I think it is a good way to introduce the students to these ideas and see how they relate.
    My profession outside of teaching is Concept Design for games and films. I specialize in characters and creatures. What is important to me on my job is to be able to create out of my head and have the skills to make it interesting and believable. Another part of my job is to ensure quality control through production (style guides and critiques). That's why I need to break everything down to simple elements and language, that so everyone can understand, so we can improve the product.

    If anything, I try to teach my students how break things down to basic visual elements and learn how to prioritize and use the elements to better communicate the idea.

    Here are some of the things that I teach my students in the figure class:
    (in order of things to learn first)

    - perspective (learn how to think and draw in space. Learn how to draw a cube, cylinder, cone, and ball in perspective and scale)

    - proportion (train your eye to see this, if proportion is off, placement, weight, and form and likeness is off too)

    - Gesture (learn how to see relationship between things: how forms are tie together by action, thought, or weight)

    - form (learn to see simple mass of the body and ignore the details. See the big idea)

    - overlaps (learn to communicate spacial relationship between forms. What is in front of what?)

    - planes (adding more information to a simple form (cylinder) by breaking it up into planes (example: Box - more 3D directional planes detail with top, sides, bottom planes).

    - construction (able to trim and add smaller forms on top of the bigger structure with out losing your dominant perspective. Putting the details on "top" of the form, not through it)

    - lighting (learn how light works and how to use light to better communicate your idea. What do I want to show? What type of lighting should I use?)

    - Shapes (compose your image with the basic 2D elements of light and shadow shapes, page layout. How do I compose the image to better stage what I want to show? How can I communicated abstractly? how do I use contrast to communicate?)

    - edge / texture (learn how the eye sees and focus. Learn atmospheric perspective. How to draw the space and air around the model)

    each step is there to re-enforce and strengthen the previous.
    kevin

    Last edited by madster; September 16th, 2005 at 08:59 PM. Reason: Consolidation of questions and answers
     

  13. The Following 15 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  14. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Class demo for the long pose class.

    Name:  27.jpg
Views: 78758
Size:  61.9 KB

    Name:  28.jpg
Views: 78543
Size:  122.8 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 02:45 AM.
     

  15. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  16. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Class demo on laying in the figure for long pose.

    Name:  29.jpg
Views: 78241
Size:  60.6 KB

    Name:  30.jpg
Views: 77678
Size:  37.8 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 02:47 AM.
     

  17. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  18. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    1st day of class for Head Drawing. Demos on Head Proportion and simple construction:

    Name:  31.jpg
Views: 93419
Size:  57.4 KB

    Name:  32.jpg
Views: 76994
Size:  57.9 KB

    Name:  33.jpg
Views: 77381
Size:  56.8 KB

    Name:  34.jpg
Views: 76524
Size:  52.1 KB

    Name:  35.jpg
Views: 76364
Size:  46.3 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 02:51 AM.
     

  19. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  20. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Here are some of the students' in class drawings from last term:

    Name:  39.jpg
Views: 76144
Size:  38.2 KB

    Name:  40.jpg
Views: 75887
Size:  40.3 KB

    Name:  41.jpg
Views: 75586
Size:  45.3 KB

    Name:  42.jpg
Views: 75548
Size:  68.4 KB

    Name:  43.jpg
Views: 75346
Size:  64.2 KB

    Name:  44.jpg
Views: 75085
Size:  58.2 KB

    Name:  45.jpg
Views: 74861
Size:  47.5 KB

    Name:  46.jpg
Views: 74729
Size:  45.3 KB

    Name:  47.jpg
Views: 74498
Size:  52.0 KB

    Name:  48.jpg
Views: 74505
Size:  55.5 KB

    Name:  49.jpg
Views: 74210
Size:  62.1 KB

    Name:  50.jpg
Views: 74135
Size:  73.7 KB

    Name:  51.jpg
Views: 73774
Size:  67.8 KB

    Name:  52.jpg
Views: 75934
Size:  58.2 KB

    Name:  53.jpg
Views: 73365
Size:  50.3 KB

    Name:  54.jpg
Views: 73167
Size:  57.7 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 03:00 AM.
     

  21. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  22. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Lay-in Demos from 2nd week of class:

    Analytical Figure Drawing Class
    Name:  36.jpg
Views: 74160
Size:  48.4 KB

    Name:  37.jpg
Views: 72967
Size:  65.4 KB

    Name:  38.jpg
Views: 72921
Size:  61.3 KB

    Head Drawing Class
    Name:  55.jpg
Views: 72493
Size:  60.7 KB

    Name:  56.jpg
Views: 72462
Size:  65.2 KB

    Name:  57.jpg
Views: 72042
Size:  63.6 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 03:09 AM.
     

  23. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  24. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Some notes I wrote on how to locate the Gesture Line. Thought might be helpful to post it here:

    Name:  58.jpg
Views: 72410
Size:  73.6 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 03:10 AM.
     

  25. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  26. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Composition Layout with simple 2 dimensional shapes.

    This week the class focus was on laying in the composition of the figure with simple 2 dimensional shapes.

    With 2D shapes alone you can solve gesture, proportion, abstraction, weight, composition, eye flow and simple form indication. The more you can solve at this stage the more effortless and elegant your design will be. A good example would be Sargent's portrait studies: very little rendering but, excellent use of shapes.

    here are some old class demos on making sure your drawings read with simple 2-D B/W Shapes (keep the comp simple). If the image looks good and reads well with just 2 values and flat shapes then you are ready to take it to the next level with rendering. If your drawing doesn't read at this simple level, no matter how much more rendering you place on top, it will not save it. Usually, a lot of the over-worked and ununified student drawings are the ones who rushed through this first crucial design stage.

    Think about what do you want the viewer to see. Try staging and contrasting your details with small, medium, and large shapes for spacing details. How can you stage your image better? How can i lead the viewers eye with direction of my shapes (framing or pointing)? How can I get the action to read better with straights and curves (tension and relax)? How can I communicate the mood with my value proportion and shape? All these thinking and problem should be answered at this stage before you start your rendering. A good 2D lay-in is more than just a copy, it is the master blue print for your priorities and composition. It should read clearly and be able to state what you want to say without relying on rendering!!

    It's a good exercise to do some master copies with this in mind and see how the masters manipulate your eye and feel with just simple shape contrast.

    Here are some examples of laying for long poses:

    Name:  59.jpg
Views: 72249
Size:  55.4 KB

    Name:  60.jpg
Views: 71568
Size:  48.3 KB

    Name:  61.jpg
Views: 71448
Size:  57.7 KB

    Name:  62.jpg
Views: 71781
Size:  105.6 KB

    red circle stands for focal point.
    red line stands for eye flow.
    green line stands for small, mid, big shape spacing.

    Name:  64.jpg
Views: 71349
Size:  78.1 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 12:47 PM.
     

  27. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  28. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Some notes on Head and Drapery:

    Name:  65.jpg
Views: 70989
Size:  90.3 KB

    Name:  66.jpg
Views: 70808
Size:  80.5 KB

    Name:  67.jpg
Views: 70576
Size:  88.6 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 12:51 PM.
     

  29. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  30. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    New demo & notes

    Light & Composition Demo
    Name:  68.jpg
Views: 48406
Size:  62.8 KB

    Name:  69.jpg
Views: 48280
Size:  87.1 KB

    Name:  70.jpg
Views: 48111
Size:  78.0 KB

    Head Drawing Notes
    Name:  71.jpg
Views: 48188
Size:  61.2 KB

    Name:  72.jpg
Views: 47917
Size:  75.7 KB

    Name:  73.jpg
Views: 47625
Size:  72.2 KB

    Name:  74.jpg
Views: 47321
Size:  70.8 KB

    Name:  75.jpg
Views: 47242
Size:  84.4 KB

    Name:  76.jpg
Views: 47121
Size:  62.1 KB

    Name:  77.jpg
Views: 46800
Size:  57.9 KB

    Name:  78.jpg
Views: 46830
Size:  70.3 KB

    Torso Demo
    Name:  79.jpg
Views: 46753
Size:  58.3 KB

    Name:  80.jpg
Views: 47305
Size:  79.5 KB

    Name:  81.jpg
Views: 47290
Size:  77.8 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 01:08 PM.
     

  31. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  32. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Demo from Long pose class:
    Name:  82.jpg
Views: 46245
Size:  77.3 KB

    Name:  83.jpg
Views: 46475
Size:  73.4 KB

    Demos from Head Drawing class:
    Name:  84.jpg
Views: 46135
Size:  75.4 KB

    Name:  85.jpg
Views: 45827
Size:  68.8 KB

    Name:  86.jpg
Views: 45650
Size:  51.1 KB

    Name:  87.jpg
Views: 45652
Size:  58.1 KB

    Name:  88.jpg
Views: 45556
Size:  77.8 KB

    Name:  89.jpg
Views: 45592
Size:  87.8 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 01:18 PM.
     

  33. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  34. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Sunday Figure Drawing Class demo. This week we just review over torso structure...
    Name:  90.jpg
Views: 45811
Size:  68.2 KB

    Name:  92.jpg
Views: 45616
Size:  72.1 KB

    Name:  93.jpg
Views: 45261
Size:  69.2 KB

    Name:  94.jpg
Views: 44988
Size:  62.8 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 01:26 PM.
     

  35. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  36. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Gnomon Updates

    Sorry for the late updates. My computer died and I am finally back on line again

    To start, here is a catch up of the demos from the Gnomon figure drawing class.

    5 min lay-in's with focus on laying down simple 2D placement:
    Name:  95.jpg
Views: 45640
Size:  172.8 KB

    Name:  96.jpg
Views: 45104
Size:  150.8 KB

    Lecture on pelvis and legs:
    Name:  97.jpg
Views: 45043
Size:  173.1 KB

    Name:  98.jpg
Views: 44901
Size:  177.3 KB

    Name:  99.jpg
Views: 44898
Size:  207.9 KB

    Name:  100.jpg
Views: 45361
Size:  183.4 KB

    Name:  101.jpg
Views: 44623
Size:  207.8 KB

    Torso breakdowns:
    Name:  102.jpg
Views: 48651
Size:  184.6 KB

    Name:  103.jpg
Views: 44823
Size:  183.9 KB

    Name:  104.jpg
Views: 43957
Size:  184.6 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 01:36 PM.
     

  37. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  38. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Head Drawing Update

    Class Head demos:
    Name:  105.jpg
Views: 43794
Size:  208.5 KB

    Name:  106.jpg
Views: 43626
Size:  179.0 KB

    Name:  107.jpg
Views: 43615
Size:  171.0 KB

    Eye Structure and Types:
    Name:  108.jpg
Views: 43527
Size:  178.2 KB

    Name:  109.jpg
Views: 43367
Size:  182.5 KB

    Name:  110.jpg
Views: 43293
Size:  180.5 KB

    Name:  111.jpg
Views: 43099
Size:  167.7 KB

    Lip Structure & Types:
    Name:  112.jpg
Views: 43104
Size:  175.8 KB

    Name:  113.jpg
Views: 42711
Size:  188.2 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 01:44 PM.
     

  39. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  40. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts

    Analytical Figure Drawing Demo Updates

    Didn't get to draw much in this class. End up spending more time with the students one on one to help them pace their drawings and correct their layin's for a long study.

    Here is some class demo demostrating different ways to lay-in the figure. Painterly or with Construction:
    Name:  114.jpg
Views: 42712
Size:  190.6 KB

    Name:  115.jpg
Views: 42532
Size:  194.2 KB

    Name:  116.jpg
Views: 42378
Size:  165.0 KB

    Name:  117.jpg
Views: 42287
Size:  188.8 KB

    Here is a comp study for the long pose:
    Name:  118.jpg
Views: 42260
Size:  213.2 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 01:48 PM.
     

  41. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  42. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Hey Dooom,

    Thanks, here are the links to the schools I am currently teaching at:

    http://www.gnomon3d.com/ (Figure Drawing)

    http://www.laafigart.com/ (head drawing, Analytical Figure Drawing)

    http://www.artcenter.edu/ (Sat Figure Drawing Workshop)

    hopefully I'll see you around

     

  43. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Here are some WIP photos taken by a gnomon student, patrick during the demos:

    demo on foreshortened torso. Creating overlaps with ribcage/stomache/pelvis


    Demo on torso front view


    Demo on back construction lay-in


    Demo on how to lay-in poses with limbs in front of body: draw the body first then connect the limbs to a appropriate spots.


    Thanks Patrick!!

    Last edited by KChen; June 13th, 2003 at 04:41 AM.
     

  44. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Q: Pardon my noobness but what is that tool? Vine Charcoal?
    A: I use either 2B conte sticks (large Demo) or 2B conte pencil for those demos. I also like to use stratmore Carbothello pencils (Black) too. I am just starting to try out hard vine charcoal, I seen Dan Thompson done some very beautiful soft renderings with them.

    Here is a pic of my tools:


    k

    Last edited by madster; September 16th, 2005 at 06:13 PM. Reason: Consolidating Q & A's
     

  45. The Following User Says Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  46. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    Demos from Analytical figure drawing, two model pose:

    1 hr demo and comp studies
    Name:  119.jpg
Views: 44557
Size:  98.6 KB

    Name:  120.jpg
Views: 41668
Size:  84.0 KB

    2 model quick block-in's
    Name:  121.jpg
Views: 41574
Size:  67.3 KB

    Name:  122.jpg
Views: 41540
Size:  63.8 KB

    Name:  123.jpg
Views: 41521
Size:  79.6 KB

    Name:  124.jpg
Views: 41399
Size:  66.4 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 06:30 PM.
     

  47. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  48. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 332 Times in 77 Posts
    10th week: Last day of Head Drawing class at Laafa. Demo on facial anatomy and expressions:

    3 min expression studies
    Name:  125.jpg
Views: 43025
Size:  92.0 KB

    Name:  126.jpg
Views: 41688
Size:  85.1 KB

    Front/side view facial muscles. facial muscles are designed for funtion and movement. The most range of move ment on our face is our mouth and our eyebrows. As you can see most facial muscles are desgned for their movements.
    Name:  127.jpg
Views: 41239
Size:  84.1 KB

    Name:  128.jpg
Views: 41552
Size:  87.7 KB

    facial muscles pulls on the face like strings. the flesh between the muscle connection points fold like a venetian blind when the muscle (string) flexes. the muscle connection and pulling point are consistant at the same place forming dimples, folds or wrinkles on the face. As we get older the flesh between the pulling points sag as the skin looses it's elastic quality.
    Name:  129.jpg
Views: 41120
Size:  70.3 KB

    Last edited by emily g; January 21st, 2007 at 06:33 PM.
     

  49. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to KChen For This Useful Post:


  50. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    209
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi, KChen.

    First of all I want to assent to all these statements
    that say thank you.

    I came across this picture and wondered
    what the use of the cutter is in drawing.
    Explanation of other tools would be
    appreciated, too!



     

  51. #27
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Arcadia, CA
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hermchen, I would imagine that the cutter is for sharpening his pencil. =) CarbOthello pencils are basically pastel pencils, and conte and conte pencils are just, well, conte. And of course he has his sander at the bottom for creating better points for his assorted mediums.

     

  52. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Hartford, CT
    Posts
    67
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I came across this picture and wondered
    what the use of the cutter is in drawing.


    As Treb said, it's probably mostly for sharpening your tools. But I've known some people who also use a razor to scratch out highlights when they want a whiter white than an eraser can give them (or if they want a sharp edge instead of the soft edges an eraser usually gives). Of course, that only works if you're using really heavy-weight cotton rag paper like Stonehenge or Arches printmaking papers (I almost always draw on Arches or Rives BFK, whichever I can afford at the time; I've also worked on watercolor paper, but sometimes the surface texture can be too much).





    (If you couldn't tell, I'm a bit of a paper fanatic. )

     

  53. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    are you talking about the blade? that is for sharpening the pencils. not for scratching. You use a blade like that on the art, and you are gonna kill the surface. It is formally for sharpening the pencils like a brush set. Big long tapering lead to the wood. These are used pencils. they dont show what that blade does for them.

     

  54. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Hartford, CT
    Posts
    67
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Fred –

    There are plenty of surfaces that can stand up to a little scratching out: heavy bristol boards, papermaking or watercolor papers and some illustration boards, to name a few. Yes, it chews up the surface a bit, but it's usually a final-stage thing anyway, so you wouldn't be going over it again anyway.

    I'm sure you're right that the blade in the pic is for sharpening the pencils, but tools have many purposes. If someone wants to experiment with scratching out highlights, they'll find a way to make it work.

    I'm just sayin'...

     

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast