Sketchbook: Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

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  1. #1
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    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

    this is a piece that was used with a world of warcraft reference.My scanner isnt that great so you cant really get all of the shading in it.
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

    Ill have more up maybe later tonight...Critiques please.Oh,im also working on getting a tablet so hopefully ill start putting up illustrations within the month.

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    Good start. Tones are good, I have a feeling it´s a bit tilted to the side, but that´s probably the scanner.
    Want to see more!

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    yeah it is a tad tilted now that i look at it harder.lol.But thanks for the input,ive gotten alot better at shading since then,i did this over summer while working as an apprentice for airbrush.

    View My Sketchbook!(Crits are needed)(Looking for a mentor)
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=141481
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  5. #4
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    Hey dude, welcome to CA! Thanks for dropping by my SB!

    Since you only have one drawing in here, all I can say is, keep it up and lets see some more!

    Well, actually there's a few tips I can drop: draw from life, make sure you're always looking at what you're drawing, it helps to squint your eyes a bit so that you can see the basic blocks of value more easily. Look into these artists: George Bridgman, Hogarth (forgot his first name), Andrew Loomis, Robert Beverly Hale. Another artist I found helpful was an artist by the name of Fritz Schider. Remember, always pay very close attention and take all the time you need to complete a painting/portrait/illustration/etc... Also, you might want to check of the Massive Black video downloads. I have found those to rather helpful.

    Good luck!

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    "Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now."
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    here is so more stuff for you guys...finally got my scanner up an ready lol. Most of this stuff is pretty crappy in my opinion,but i guess thats up for you guys to decide.Most of the stuff in here is just random spurts of thoughts on paper.also,about 4 of these sketches are from my old sketchbook from the summer.

    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

    View My Sketchbook!(Crits are needed)(Looking for a mentor)
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=141481
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    Hopefully ill get more up tonight when i get off work!

    View My Sketchbook!(Crits are needed)(Looking for a mentor)
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=141481
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    your style looks good, nice rendering and values (which i'm not very good at). I'll suggest, as said before, to work on your anatomy skills (by studying it from books and/or life drawing). Also, go get a tablet RIGHT NOW! nah, seriousky, it's the best thing you can invest your money in.

    Keep it up!

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    some more stuff...little later than i promised,i have a few hogarthe studies in here,most of the stuff is just characters and a few random doodles. and a birdie



    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...
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    View My Sketchbook!(Crits are needed)(Looking for a mentor)
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=141481
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    hopefully ill have more up in the next few days.

    View My Sketchbook!(Crits are needed)(Looking for a mentor)
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=141481
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    I wish I drew this much when I was 16..keep doing the studies man, they'll definitely help, keep working hard!

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    looking good. keep it up ,work hard , and ya off to a good start : D

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    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

    this is a self portrait i had to do for digital arts class,i call this the Alice in Chains wash.

    this is the original...
    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

    with my wash,i still have to work on it a little, i have to get rid of the blemishes..and a few other little things.

    Sketchbook of a 16 year old...

    this is another one,i purposely cut out the mouth, i basically was trying to get a focus on the eyes. Part of the project was to have a image focused up close,with the stuff in the background unfocused.

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    haha that my friend, is what Jason Manley calls the "horror movie palette" orange hues for highlights and green hues for shadows, keep an eye out for it next time your watch a horror movie

    you might want to cut the mouth just a sliiiightly bit more? now that you mentioned it my attention keeps getting drawn to the tiny bit of upper lip that you didn't cut out lol...just nitpicking

    the Alice in Chains wash SP looks good, i don't know much about photography but compositional wise i feel that you might've cut out too much at the top, showing a bit more of the forehead would work better i reckon, just my 2 cents for what its worth...

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    now that i think about it,your right,i have seen that in alot of horror movies.As far as the upper lip and the forehead,your right,i should have done those things.Hopefully ill get to edit them some more tomorrow in my DA class.

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    Thanks for posting on my Sb................ If you dont mind me saying, you have to work a lot more on the anatomy ....screw shading for the time being..just concentrate on the forms and proportions...draw a lot from reference.....use books like Hogarth's etc.....shading , values , midtones can come later......

    good start...but a long way to go!!
    Keep posting and draw till the metal band of you pencil!

    -Adi!!

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    Hey man, looking for advice?
    If I were 16 years old again, I'd try to follow this advices:
    -Study the figure as if there were no tomorrow. I really mean this. It's not about being able to make a good figure with lots of work, it's also about making it fast and without difficult into any position you may think. This is absolutely key. Think about it this way: you will draw figures in 98% of your drawings for the rest of your life, so, if you keep drawing, you will have to learn it eventually. And also, the sooner you get there with the figure, the sooner you'll be a professional.
    -When you try new things (perspective of several characters, or animals, or a complex shot, or something like that), you'll tend to do a bad job, at least worst than when you do the usual stuff you draw. People often repress themselves from doing this things for this very reason. Don't. The more you suck at something, the more you should draw that. And it's also true that the more you draw something the more you learn to enjoy it.
    -Forget the shading for now, it will give you lots of applause from your family and friends, but it's not good for improving: If you don't know perfect how to draw the shapes in perspective, then your rendering will be of low quality, no matter how fine the cross-hatching. The basis of drawing is learning to draw geometrical shapes in perspective. Practice them a lot, if they became second nature to you (fast and easy), then nothing else will be difficult. Many books explain great methods, Bridgman is very good, and loomis too, but I'd also check out Vilppu's. His approach for the beginning is in many ways the best one.
    -Faces, Hands and full figure are essential. Practice them equally. Perspective too. Do it right: If you draw heads, don't draw them always in front view, but also in side view, top, bottom, 3/4 from the side and 3/4 from above, and then the most difficult view, that's 3/4 of the side and 3/4 of top of bottom at the same time. If you draw figures, don't fill the details of the anatomy at first. Just get the proportions, balance, and a gesture. The hands can be drawn form many positions too, and they always have gesture in them.
    -Try to do sequences, like in an animation, that'll make you understand the movement better, and it'll get you more fluidity in them.
    -Apply what you learn to the drawings that you make for fun (this is also very important).
    -If you want to work at this, take it seriously now: Most talented teenagers tend to think that they are very good for their age. You should look at Picasso drawings at 16; there are lot's of guys that at 17 draw like Raphael, and they turn to be the good ones, and yet they try to get better. If you don't try to get better, what chance do you have?
    If you want to be good, you must really do the studies, don't just copy some pages that you fancy, or make perspective exercises without a ruler, or make them without really trying to get what you're learning in your system. The studies are about actually learning how to do things. Also, make your own, or take the example of the study as a guide. Don't just copy stuff, that's never good.
    If you're not VERY good at 20 it will get more and more difficult to improve from there, because you'll have lots of things to do and not so many time to learn what you didn't when you should.
    My advice is, decide were if it's a fun job, or just fun.
    Most of us start because we want women, or not to work ever. Then we realize that you have to make an effort at this, and then another one, and then more. But you also get more control of what you can do, and start enjoying it more and more, so you put more effort because you know that you'll be rewarded.
    (It is still way better than to work).
    -Some stuff about learning the basics are boring, but if you dedicate to this subjects a great deal, and you trust in them, you're saving yourself form doing them in the future, and getting the most profit out of it. It's like buying a great guitar: If you are going to buy one at some point of your life, buy it now, you'll pay the same, but enjoy it for more time.
    Also, buy it great at once, or you'll have to buy the great one later and you'll end up spending more money. With drawing is the same; try to get a great basis.
    -Develop your own learning process, take what YOU think that would make you a great artist and do it. The rest are just advices.
    -Sometimes you need to see at things and study in your own mind how they are, light too, you may have to think about shape, etc; other times, you'll only advance through practice and only practice. Don't underestimate the importance of practice.
    -Understand that if you think that "some day" you'll be good, that means that someday you'll have to make those things like for example drawing hands (and only hands) for 4 months. Filling paper after paper. The day one you get good, will only come after the day when you do those maniac excercises.

    This is just for you to think about this issues. It's not what I did, it's the ideal process (I'm paying now). Many years that I could've used to evolve were wasted drawing shaded faces from the front view.
    Try not to be hard on you when you fail at something, or disappointed if you encounter someone that makes it better and is perhaps even younger.
    Realize that there's no level that you're born with. Mozart was great because his father hit him with the ruler. You can change every odd against you, to your favor. You can turn to be the best artist ever, it depends on how much you want it and how clever you're to achive it.
    I wish you the best of lucks.

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