Art: finding your artistic voice and vision

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  1. #1
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    finding your artistic voice and vision

    so what is this thing called artistic voice or vision? ive heard it referred to a million times yet no explanation ive found could satisfy me. in our work, we are told to find it, but when im sitting there in front of my sketchbook i dont have some grand plan or idea i need to get across, i just have an incredible urge to create, and even if my work does have an idea behind it, it is never so glamorous as people seem to make it out to be. so is this thing just a way that artists will attract attention to their work, by making some dramatic 'artisitic statement'?

    is it in line with the whole modern art craze, where we force onlookers to decide what we create is, and to find meaning in a mess of lines? or, perhaps, is it a concept that i cannot grasp? i dont want to think im completely ignorant when it comes to art, but when i look through a book on art, a college catalog, or most art publications i find it is littered with statements like 'find your vision' and im left wondering what on earth its talking about.

    if i want to convey a sense of sadness to a picture, i know how to draw someone looking sad, and i would use dark blues and cool colors and such to push that idea further, but i dont think thats a vision, to me thats just how i would convey that emotion. is artistic vision the same as an artists technique, or is artistic vision simply the knowledge of how to convey an emotion or idea?

    i hope that any of the questions i have posed here do not offend anyone, as that is not my intention. i think that this could be a good topic for discussion, as i am extremely interested in anything any of you have to say about it. again though, i hope that none of you would think me a fool for wondering about something that may be an integral part of an artists life... perhaps if i lack in this knowledge i can be enlightened here.

    reply or not, thanks for investing your time in reading all of this.

    chris

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  3. #2
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    Hmm, this is the soon-to-be art student, yes?

    Calm yourself, Grasshopper. You are about to be awash in information and other things, and somewhere in it you may find the answers you seek, or you may find something you can form into your own satisfactory answer.

    I can't give you my own answers to all your questions now, but relax in the knowledge that everyone has their own answers, and there isn't one truth to any of it. It's all gray area, with little shining highlights of absolutes around the edges.

    As for 'artistic vision', this merely refers to the ideas that artists try to convey in their work. If you have a strong vision and the skills to represent it, then you will probably be able to create some fulfilling work.

    Just remember: Picasso was kicked out of the Louvre permanently because he was going into the museum with paints to touch up his own works while they were on display. I think he's the one who said "Paintings are never finished, they are merely abandoned."

    In seeking your answers, simply keep asking yourself, 'what do I want to do?' It's okay if you change your mind three or four dozen times, too. Just keep going.

    P.S. I used to feel like you. Now I long for that time again!

    /jzero

    /jzero

    'don't believe everything you think.'
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    thanks for the reply, since i posted that ive had some help and im settling down. your advice is very much appreciated, though. i was just getting really nervous about art and stuff, but im cool with it now

    thanks!
    chris

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  5. #4
    zak Guest
    i dunno for me its something that motivates me when im working on a picture. it might be an idea i have, something id like the picture to be, a certain thing im trying to achieve, or merely a part of the picture i really like. dont crack your head open about it. youll find the answer yourself when the time comes

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    Artistic Voice

    Artistic Voice refers to each persons unique style.
    if you have a particularly strong 'Voice' People can identify your work by it alone.
    sometimes it takes years to develop a voice and some people just fall in to it.
    I wouldn't worry about it, it sounds like you are well on your way to fine tuning your voice.
    where you use color and expression to convey sadness someone else might use lines and background.

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    Blue Blue, Electric Blue
    That's the color of my room...
    "Artistic voice" is an interesting turn of phrase, in part because it’s used and abused so often, but mainly because voice is such an old and loaded term. Most people read "style" for voice or vision, so telling someone to find their own voice is basically like saying "find your own style" or "be original." But the implication (that you don't have a voice to begin with, or somehow can't locate it), can also be subtly demeaning without really saying anything, so I try to avoid it when speaking about other people’s works. On the other hand though, voice can be an insightful concept to toy around if we’re making analogies. Our voice, like our work, (and everything else about us), changes with time. It’s high pitched and frantic when we’re young, awkward in adolescence, matures with us as we age. We also use the term ‘voice’ to describe the way verbs work, so there's that angle too. It’s a grammatical curiosity that almost every language still in use today has only two voices: active and passive.

    John painted the picture.
    The picture was painted by John.

    In the first example the verb “painted” is said to be in the active voice, in the second it is said to be in the passive voice. Either you have an active agent, or a passive recipient of the action, pretty much all across the board (except maybe if you live in Iceland). The ancient Greeks and others Indo-European groups had a third voice however, the Middle voice. We can observe it as a grammatical category, but it almost defies comprehension since it doesn’t fall into the active/passive binary imposed on us by our language. Its vary alien to our general way of thinking. You can almost approach it with an English phrase like “the engine seized (itself)”, but even that doesn’t quite get you there. The middle voice is said to be in the middle of the active/passive voice, because the subject cannot be categorized as either agent or patient, but has elements of both. In ancient Greek the middle voice is often reflexive, denoting that the subject acts on or for itself, but this sometimes extends to inanimate or natural objects too, so things have a way of getting complicated.

    Voice
    c.1290, "sound made by the human mouth," from O.Fr. voiz, from L. vocem (nom. vox) "voice, sound, utterance, cry, call, speech, sentence, language, word," related to vocare "to call," from PIE base *wek- "give vocal utterance, speak" (cf. Skt. vakti "speaks, says," vacas- "word;" Avestan vac- "speak, say;" Gk. aor. eipon "spoke, said," epos "word;" O.Prus. wackis "cry;" Ger. er-wähnen "to mention"). Replaced O.E. stefn. Meaning "ability in a singer" is first attested 1607. Verb meaning "to express" (a feeling, opinion, etc.) first attested 1607. The noun in this sense (in ref. to groups of people, etc., e.g. Voice of America) is recorded from 1390.

    Sound
    "noise," c.1280, soun, from O.Fr. son, from L. sonus "sound," from PIE *swonos, from base *swen- "to sound" (cf. Skt. svanati "it sounds," svanah "sound, tone;" L. sonare "to sound;" O.Ir. senim "the playing of an instrument;" O.E. geswin "music, song," swinsian "to sing;" O.N. svanr, O.E. swan "swan," prop. "the sounding bird"). The final -d was established c.1350-1550 as part of a tendency to add -d- after -n-. The verb is attested from c.1300, from L. sonare, from sonus. First record of sound barrier is from 1939. Soundtrack is from 1929; sound check is from 1977; sound effects is 1909, originally live accompaniments to silent films.

    Vision
    c.1290, "something seen in the imagination or in the supernatural," from Anglo-Fr. visioun, O.Fr. vision, from L. visionem (nom. visio) "act of seeing, sight, thing seen," from pp. stem of videre "to see," from PIE base *weid- "to know, to see" (cf. Skt. veda "I know;" Avestan vaeda "I know;" Gk. oida, Doric woida "I know," idein "to see;" O.Ir. fis "vision," find "white," i.e. "clearly seen," fiuss "knowledge;" Welsh gwyn, Gaulish vindos, Breton gwenn "white;" Goth., O.Swed., O.E. witan "to know;" Goth. weitan "to see;" Eng. wise, Ger. wissen "to know;" Lith. vysti "to see;" Bulg. vidya "I see;" Pol. widziec' "to see," weidziec' "to know;" Rus. videt' "to see," vest' "news," O.Russ. vedat' "to know"). The meaning "sense of sight" is first recorded c.1491. Meaning "statesman-like foresight, political sagacity" is attested from 1926.


    Don't you wonder sometimes?


    Last edited by Jasonwclark; May 1st, 2008 at 05:56 PM.
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