Painter 7 tips and pointers

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Black Rock City
    Posts
    1,986
    Thanks
    586
    Thanked 1,220 Times in 133 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Austin TX
    Posts
    10,749
    Thanks
    2,078
    Thanked 11,132 Times in 2,680 Posts
    Follows
    2
    Following
    1
    the chalk tool is invaluable when used with your OWN paper textures. It is THE tool that allows for natural marks to happen (if you use natural images for your paper textures..i.e. black and white photos of concrete, treebark, you name it)

    natural surfaces can be used to better suggest paint surface as well as object surface within the image.

    the chalk tool breaks up the overly digital looking airbrush tool or other digitized looking tools.

    the watercolor brush in painter six is an excellent tool to use in conjunction with the other brushes as it allows you to shift the colors of marks and even shift the values.


    j

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA
    Posts
    87
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    My tip:

    Use the feature, well, and resaturation settings. They are your friend. I don't use any of the blending tools in painter, as they don't even come close to the natural feel of tweaking one fo the brushes with bristles. If you just turn the resatruation down to zero, and bleed up to about 50% or more, you get the perfect blending tool. Tweak the feature according to how big your brush size is, and how spread out you want your bristles.

    http://www.ethereality.info - The art, music, photography, and writings of Robert Chang.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    1,630
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 111 Times in 104 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This is more like it! Great tips so far guys. I'm already feeling more comfortable. Now all we need is for Android to lay some knowledge bombs on us.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    284
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Something I found useful with Painter.

    Attach the "Flip Horizontal" canvas function to an F-key, like F1.

    Periodically, press F1 to mirror the image. You get a suprise when you see the picture in reverse as alot of errors regarding proportion and perspective might appear. Work with the reverse image for a while before flipping back to the original alignment. Bear in mind that the lighting is coming from a different direction when you reverse the image though...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA
    Posts
    87
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    But that flip function only does the base layer. It won't work if you have more than one layer.

    http://www.ethereality.info - The art, music, photography, and writings of Robert Chang.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    2,963
    Thanks
    1,345
    Thanked 1,308 Times in 307 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    A brief tip.

    When Painting and you want a light source reference, create a layer and fill it with gray, then use the "apply lighting" effect to estabolish a light source for you to be consistant with. You'll have to tweak the spread and brightness bars to get what you want. This is a great way to learn. Not a solution. Keep the layer under whatever you're trying to create highlights on so you can learn to create the effect yourself. It mostly serves the purpose of providing a visable representation of the light reflecting off your subject.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    27
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    One way you can create a light source is to set the lights the way you want. Test it on a duplicate layer of your image (press the "F" key, then the "Alt" key) The new layer will be directly under the selected layer. Once you have the lighting you want, save the lights in the default library or better yet create a new library with your project name so you don't clog the default libray and slow Painter down.

    After applying the lights, select the layer in the masks list and erase portions of the mask to better control how the light
    affects the underlying image. When you're satisfied, group and collapse the layers.

    Another method is to use the Lasso tool to select portions of your image; feather the edges if you don't want a sharp edge
    then apply the lights to it.

    You can flip any individual layer, or pick certain ones, or select them all to be flipped. This will also work when you assign the shortcut to one of the function keys.

    Richard
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nottingham; England
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    91
    Thanked 63 Times in 36 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Originally posted by ceenda
    Something I found useful with Painter.

    Attach the "Flip Horizontal" canvas function to an F-key, like F1.

    Periodically, press F1 to mirror the image. You get a suprise when you see the picture in reverse as alot of errors regarding proportion and perspective might appear. Work with the reverse image for a while before flipping back to the original alignment. Bear in mind that the lighting is coming from a different direction when you reverse the image though...
    This is a good tip, thanks for sharing

    In order to view the entire image in flipped state when working with layers, select 'clone' from the file menu. This drops all the layers allowing you to flip the complete image whilst leaving the original 'layered' image intact.

    David

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA
    Posts
    87
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good tip on the clone bit. I don't understand why they can't just make it like photoshop and flip all the layers though.

    Things like that turns a lot of potential Painter users off, making them run back to photoshop screaming. The designers at Procreate need to pull their heads out of their asses and fix simple things like that.

    http://www.ethereality.info - The art, music, photography, and writings of Robert Chang.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    :funny:

    well put Lunatique

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    36
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Instead of complaining here...which is like preaching to the choir, why not tell Procreate themselves and perhaps it will be addressed in the next rev.

    http://www.critical-depth.com/cgi-b...p?TOPIC_ID=1234

    BTW, I agree it's a pain to do simple things like flipping the image.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    On the fringes of "acceptable" observation and commentary.
    Posts
    2,347
    Thanks
    255
    Thanked 136 Times in 60 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Talking General Forum Request

    The tips and technique tricks thread is an excellent one, BUT...

    It, like other threads is one of those that could become TERRIBLY long as time goes on, so,

    I would make the request to limit replies for some threads like this one to say, 50 or so. Then start another thread, such as Tips and Tricks 2, and so on.

    This would make reading them SO much easier for visitors, and SO much easier for future reference without having to start at the beginning to get to tip number 483 each and every time....

    I would also request a basic Corel/Procreate bitch/moan/groan/cry and suggestion thread. We almost all know they won't really change anything, but it will give the rest of us a place to go and dump out our frustrations as we suffer through excess keystrokes, lame workarounds, and sorry right-click menu offerings.

    Thanks!

    Change is Inevitable, Growth is Optional
    I am The Choosen One!
    Jason sez: Draw more from Life!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Level 6
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This may sound stupid...and obvious, but spend time learning the keyboard shortcuts. This will save you a lot of needless dialogue/menu clicking time.

    Also, spend time setting up your own custom palettes. Since menu items can be added to your custom palette(s) you can potentially reduce the number of palette-boxes sucking up screen real estate to just your own custom one plus the color-picker. If I'm using one of my custom colorsets, sometimes that's the only palette box open, since I can access my favorite brushes (custom palette) with a button-click anywhere on the drawing instead of picking them off a palette.

    One more thing on the main palette-boxes. They can be turned on and off quickly to declutter your screen by using "ctrl"(PC) plus a number key. Unless you're constantly changing parameters, you really don't need all those palette-boxes open anyway, since most of the major functions can be accessed through the keyboard shortcuts. When you do need them, they're just a keyboard shortcut away themselves.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Level 6
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I was reading in the "rants and raves" section some complaints about quick one-click access to layer functions. And the fact that Painter has none...well, that's not exactly true.

    There's a quick solution, and that is to assign "add" layer, "drop" layer and "trash" layer to function keys through the edit>preferences>function key dialog box. You do the actual assignment selection by clicking on the dark right triangle on the "Layers" heading --that pops out the command list for Layers and you simply select from there. F5-F8 are my layer buttons, but you can choose anything you want.

    The function key assigments are a great timesaver and frustration-saver when using Painter. They can be used for all kinds of things. If anyone else has a cool use for the function keys please post! I'd love to see how others are using them.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    27
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Since I create and use nozzles in much of my work I have set up my function keys like this:
    http://www.rapartz.com/download/pdf/

    Richard
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Level 6
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey, that's cool Richard - thanks for showing your function key use, gives me some ideas.

    Here's some more great stuff from Jinny Brown; I hope she doesn't mind me re-posting here; but I figure if someone takes advantage of her online Painter lessons because of this post it's worth it.

    <snip>
    In all versions 5, 5.5, 6, and 7 (unless noted for a specific version), to access the Tools, click the following keys that are listed as the Tools icons appear in the Tools palette beginning in the top row and reading from left to right:

    M = Magnifier
    G = Grabber
    E = Rotate Page (hidden below the Grabber tool)
    C = Crop
    L = Lasso
    W = Magic Wand
    P = Pen
    Q = Quick Curve (hidden below the Pen tool)
    I = Rectangular Shape
    J = Oval Shape (hidden below the Rectangular Shape tool)
    B = Brush (Freehand)
    V = Brush (Straight Lines)
    K = Paint Bucket
    D = Dropper
    R = Rectangular Selection
    O = Oval Selection (hidden below the Rectangular Selection tool)
    F = Layer Adjuster (Painter 6 and 7)
    F = Floater Adjuster (Painter 5.5 and earlier)
    S = Selection Adjuster (hidden below the Layer Adjuster tool)
    H = Shape Selection (hidden below the Layer Adjuster tool)
    T = Text
    Z = Scissors
    A = Add Point (hidden below the Scissors tool)
    X = Remove Point (hidden below the Scissors tool)
    Y = Convert Point (hidden below the Scissors tool)

    Some of the keystroke commands in Painter 7 are different from earlier versions. There's a Visual Guide for Keystroke Shortcuts written by Painter Developer John Derry that you can download from my site at (see the Visual Guides for Water Colors and Liquid Ink too):
    http://www.pixelalley.com/tutorials/...downloads.html

    One example of the differences in keystroke commands:

    Painter 5, 5.5, and 6: Hold down the Ctrl/Command+Alt/Option keys, then drag to resize your brush dab.

    Painter 7: Hold down the Ctrl/Command+Shift+Alt/Option keys, then drag to resize your brush dab

    There's also a basic tutorial for using the Tools palette at PixelAlley that might help newcomers to Painter (version 5, 5.5, 6, and 7):
    http://www.pixelalley.com/tutorials/...olpalette.html

    .. and another one that gives the letter commands to activate the tools, and it might be easier to learn than the list above because it includes screen prints:
    http://www.pixelalley.com/tutorials/...tter_keys.html

    --------------------

    Jinny Brown

    PixelAlley Links - Jin's Painter Classes
    see http://www.pixelalley.com
    or the PixelAlley Section Links Page at:
    http://www.pixelalley.com/pixelalley...ons-pages.html
    Visit us in the Painter Forum at In Depth Discussions: http://www.critical-depth.com/cgi-bin/idd/

    <snip>

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    here's my somewhat lengthy contribution:

    For quick sketches i work at a lower resolution record a script and then playit back at a higher resolution. The trick is you have to select all before you record and then select an area in which you want the script to play back again. (detail in the help file)

    The reality:
    Oops I forgot to select all before I started. My master piece is recorded at 640x480!!.
    Now I can't replay at a higher rez. aargh.

    the antidote:

    1. In Painter Export script to text. objects palette, scripts title bar, menu icon choose Open script.
    click on export and pick a filename. A text file will be created. click on done.

    2. look at the script in your favourite text editor e.g. notepad

    3. look for a line that looks something like this.
    new_3 "Untitled-4" width 1200 height 1000 resolution 72.00000 width_unit 1 height_unit 1 resolution_unit 1 paper_color red 213 green 106 blue 0 movie 0 frames 1

    4. take note of the width and height

    5.delete the line. This stops painter from opening a new file so you can open the file yourself before you run the script.

    6. look for lines similar to these two lines at the top of the script
    start_time date 08 Sep 2002 time 03:20 PM
    start_random 1741810400 405201650



    7. inbetween these two line add the playback_reference_rectangle line filling in
    the height value remembered in the previous step after bottom instead of 1000
    and the width value after right instead of 1200
    to look like this:

    start_time date 08 Sep 2002 time 03:20 PM
    playback_reference_rectangle top 0 left 0 bottom 1000 right 1200
    start_random 1741810400 405201650


    8. save the file as a new text file

    9. in Painter import the modified script. objects palette, scripts title bar, menu icon choose Open script.
    click on import and pick the newly modified script text file.

    It should work for Painter 6.1 and Painter 7

    I'm sure some of this can be done from within Painter, but Painter always faints on me when I start editing the scripts so the text editing seems much more stable.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    On the fringes of "acceptable" observation and commentary.
    Posts
    2,347
    Thanks
    255
    Thanked 136 Times in 60 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    As much as I LOVE Painter 7 & 8, I still find myself running screaming back to Photoshop everytime I want to do something EASY, like have a default foreground/background of black and white...or to create a new layer with the keyboard, or NOT have the darn thing revert down to the Canvas Layer (which you CANNOT lock, but must duplicate and lift), or to drag a gradient from anywhere but the center, and the list goes on...

    It is SO lame to have to make basics F-key functions, but since that is the game Corel (They are no longer pro-create) wants us to play, here are MY best tips...

    I have the first four F-keys set up to Clone Select all, delete and turn on Tracing paper for when I am working on techniques. I have the F-5 key set to center the image on the screen for when I'm working at high resolutions and need to align myself quickly, and I have the F-9 key set to adjust the Wacom sensitivity, as you should do that almost each and every time you open Painter to insure the best use of those 1024 levels of sensitivity.

    Change is Inevitable, Growth is Optional
    I am The Choosen One!
    Jason sez: Draw more from Life!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Compton CAli
    Posts
    664
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    droid i can only help so much

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    One trick I found is that using the brushes, it's better to slowly build-up the colors with long, continuous brushtrokes, meaning, avoid lifting the pen from the tablet. The colors seem to mesh better. It seems to go faster if you take your time.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    by the sea, in the north, on the west, below the white bears
    Posts
    151
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Originally posted by Redmond
    It seems to go faster if you take your time.
    heehee..sorry couldnt help it

    "Trust Yourself"

    Arin Ringwald - Student of Illustration and Design

    www.dabble.dream.cx
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook