Art: vermeer study (oils)
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    vermeer study (oils)

    Yay CA!

    Just finished a Vermeer study, hope you dig it!
    Took about 4 weeks, two of them working all day, the other two on and off
    Learned so much...
    The guy really knew what he was doing....!
    (Edit: the size is about 40x42cm / 15.7x16.5in, which is almost the same as the original I think)





    By the way, there's a great Vermeer site:
    www.essentialvermeer.com


    .

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    Last edited by dorian; October 7th, 2008 at 06:32 PM. Reason: (size added)
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    haha thats sweet dorian! you're right, he definitely knew what he was doing.
    great study dood.

    c36

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    Really very good. Did you glaze a lot?

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    What a great study! The color and amount of detail are excellent. Beautiful as per usual dorian, your work is always a delight

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    coro: cheers sir
    Craig: not too much, just the highest chroma areas, bright blue in her apron, some of the bread and red pottery - first time I tried glazing though - reeally makes a difference! (The blue cloth on the table is blue + white painted opaquely, very different from the bright blue in the apron!)
    Orchid: thanks a lot I eat all my ugly paintings

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    That's great, Dorian! Your attention to detail is as impressive as your attention span.

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    Excellent study! I love it!

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    hey dorian!

    great study, you managed to capture some of that vermeer essence

    i am curious though, i have read that vermeer used lead tin yellow for those cool lemony tones ~ did you try to adopt what historians have deduced to be vermeer's palette, or one you have already been accustomed to? ( i only ask because i have been interested in using some lead tin yellow, but it seems a bit rare and essentially just a naples yellow in the long run...)

    great job again, and i think i even bumped into you at the grand central academy this summer when you dropped by!

    tim

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    I'd be interested to know what some of the passages were that you got the most insight out of.

    Top notch stuff man. Very nice.

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    wow man, it's really really good!
    this is one of my favorite paintings of, like, all time (the real vermeer haha)
    what have you learned? and what was your palette?
    again, many kudos!

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    looks good! beautiful use of color

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    beautiful work man...sometimes i wish i could trade places with you. keep it up...I have the feeling you are going to create some meaningful and beautiful personal works when your studies are completed.

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    just had to comment again. has anybody looked at a lot of vermeers paintings? They have this somewhat eeire feel to em or maybe its just me? Shit makes me want to break out my traditional oil.

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    Great job, Dorian. Are there any Vermeers to see in Florence? An interesting thing about his paintings is how low the chroma is in real life compared to most reproductions.


    Tristan Elwell
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    Two words-- God damn.

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    Fantastic Study Dorian, many thanks for sharing, very enlightening.

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    Awesome job.

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    Hehe, I had that piece of yours in my hands!
    Missing you, brother,
    Khan

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    Congratulations! I too would be interested to know more exactly what things you learned..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Elwell, I had the impressions the colors on the milkmaid in real life where actually more vibrant. The way I remember it was that the colors on the arm closest to us where way more separated that you see on most reproduction. You can clearly see a more blue area near elbow, red area near hand, yellow and white towards the upper side near the sleeves of her vest.
    You may well be right, the Milkmaid is one of the few I haven't seen in the flesh.


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    Thank you. Vermeer is one of my favourties ad this is a beautiful reproduction.

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    VampireHungerStrike & nicehighs: thanks guys

    mrgrumble: With lead-tin yellow's high lead content I'd stay away from it (in case it's still around?) However: "If natural ultramarine blue could be considered the king of Vermeer's palette, lead-tin yellow would justly be called its queen" (some great info on it at http://www.essentialvermeer.com/pale...in_yellow.html) - No I've not used lead-tin yellow, it was mostly yellow ochre pale (w/n) and cadmium yellow (w/n). We didn't really talk about Vermeer's methods, as it was just a workshop on underpainting/overpainting techniques and there was a pretty wide range of styles and periods to choose paintings from. So no special technical tricks learned :/ ;]
    GCA: oh! Awesome

    Carl: Wow - I'm flattered, thanks!! Hm, what parts did I get most out of..
    • I think the high chroma blue bits, as it was the first time I tried glazing
    • the highly textured areas, (face, bread, etc.) because there's SO MUCH going on in there and I realized that despite all the information there are just "no" mistakes. Even if he kept some things rougher (some voices claim the painting was left unfinished) everything is there, the right hue, value, chroma, edges.. just incredible...
    • overall just getting more experience mixing and applying paint, the thing is more or less my 3rd "serious" painting, so I have no idea what I'm doing.. It's amazing how much good drawing helps!
    • something else I learned: paint on canvas and printed ink on the repoduction I was working from don't react to light the same way. At. All. One evening I turned on the very yellow incadescent light in my room as the natural light was becoming too dim. I continued painting the background left to the figure and suddenly realized that the whole area was much too green. Soo.. having no experience I thought "oops, must've painted it too green!" and covered it with a more yellow color to match the reproduction. Then I must've got a flash of intelligence and took the painting and reproduction outside - et voilą: the painting was now much too yellow.. So I rubbed the stuff off and made it greener again and will remember forever that the color of the light source has a different effect on a reproduction than on oil paint.
    • that's about it I think


    Frank: thanks :] For "what have you learned?" see above - the palette was more or less: ivory black, raw umber, green umber (old holland), burnt umber, yellow ochre pale, cad red, cad yellow, cad orange & ultramarine blue. (all but green umber are winsor & newton I think)

    alicat08: thanks!

    Jason: haha nice Hilarious The only thing that would bother me about that is not meeting you because you'd be here.. But I booked the tickets anyway! You'll fly October 26th, check PM for e-ticket!
    Thanks Jason, I really appreciate those words. I do hope we get to hang out & talk some day.
    You guys are continually inspiring me to learn more, draw more, paint more and also fight my shyness and try to share some of the things I've kind of figured out so far.
    Keep rockin!

    Elwell: Thank you! I don't think there are any, no. Italian renaissance is the big thing here I've seen a few in NYC and London - the reproductions of the Milkmaid I find online are all very low chroma and I think that indeed mine is a bit too much. I guess I'm used to seeing all this intense color in the world around me all the time. Also, his might have grayed a little.
    The reproduction I worked from was also missing some information in the darks, I think.

    Ericus, Victor B, draw & clanlord: thank yooou guys

    Chupacabra: hehe yeah! What an honour! (For me) Hope to see you soon!

    Jens: hey! Long time no see, hope you're doing well! You meant the original is higher chroma than most reproductions, right? (Not higher than my version)

    Serpian: see above

    Faust: cheers


    Here's some close ups! Showing that there's a lot more that could've been done.. ;]

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  26. #24
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    wow! great!

    vermeer is a true master indeed.. did a study once myself, of the girl with the pearl. had to go and see the original just to figure out how he did it.. made it with a twist though

    good work!

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    Nice one!

    Last edited by dorian; January 2nd, 2009 at 01:27 PM.
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    Beautiful study. That is one of my favorite Vermeers. Thanks for sharing, very inspiring.

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    Wonderful study!! Wow...your level of skill never ceases to amaze and inspire me

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    Great study. You did a great job managing the values within the shadows. Thanks for posting those close ups too. You're doing an amazing job. Keep it up.

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    Really beautiful!!
    Could you please tell me what medium did you use and maybe a step by step including canvas preparation? Thanks

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    Great study Dorian. You've been developing at lightspeed since you started at the Florence Academy.

    I want to go there myself some day. Better start piling cash.

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