Hulk WIP
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  1. #1
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    Hulk WIP

    Here's Hulk, Work In progress. I'm having a hard time with his fist.

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  2. #2
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    Not a bad start.

    Firstly, there's the issue of cropping. When working traditionally, it's crucial to pre-plan a finished illustration before you begin. Sketch up some small, quick thumbnails to get a good feeling for the pose and composition.

    This applies mostly in reference to Hulk's left arm. It looks like you ran out of room there, and as a result, his forearm doesn't look like it'd connect to the theoretical elbow position established by the upper arm.

    Though Hulk's muscles are highly exaggerated, they're still grounded by human anatomy. What this means is that you can go nuts on the size of the muscles, but they'll still have to connect to one another realistically. Certain key areas seem somewhat lacking in accuracy - such as the pectoral-deltoid junction. A great book to help learn anatomy (in addition to Loomis and Bridgman that I mentioned earlier), is Stephen Rogers Peck's Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist. Also, try to get a good feeling for how the pro's go about rendering Hulk. Check out Marko's newly finished works if you haven't already. He also has some slightly older Hulk pictures in Marvel Year One. Pay close attention to how he renders form and how his Hulk still has colossal proportions, but maintains believable anatomy.

    Hands can be extremely difficult to draw. In fact, Andrew Loomis recommends drawing a hand at least once a day. Bridgman's Constructive Anatomy has several pages on the constituent forms of hands. It's definitely worth the read if you haven't seen it already. Lastly, you can always use a mirror (or camera) and pose your own hand and use it as reference. Be careful to make sure that the direction and intensity of the light source in your reference is consistent with that in your drawing.

    This relates to my next point. I feel that Hulk's jaw is arbitrarily dark in this case. It's important to remember that all shadows and highlights relate to the viewer the direction of the light source; if there are any inconsistencies, then the viewer will feel that something is "off", even if they can't pinpoint it. Establish the direction and intensity of the light source. Make a light mark on the paper to remind you. It's important that you don't limit the direction of your light source to the plane of the paper (ex: "the light is coming from our right" or "the light source is coming from the top"). Rather, you should define the light source in 3-dimensional space (ex: "the light is coming from our right but slightly behind hulk" or "the light source is coming from the top but greatly in front of hulk, forming a downward 45 degree angle"). When making an indicator for the direction of the light source, it helps to draw a cone to better represent where the light is coming from spatially.

    After you define your light source, think of your figure as consisting of a series of simple planes in 3d space. Planes that are perpendicular to the light source will be brightest. As planes bend away, they will slowly get darker. Don't forget to take into account the local color of the object, and any resultant bounce-light that might illuminate some shadows (ex: If the light is above and in front, there will be a shadow under the chin; however, light can bounce of the chest and partially illuminate that chin). As I've mentioned previously, this is where defining your value range is important (and limiting the use of the white of the paper). Don't forget about cast shadows - if a character has an arm raised, and it's in the line between the light source and an illuminated body part, then the arm will form a cast shadow on said body part).

    Gregpro's Paintovers are a great reference to check out. This one in particular applies to the concept of simplified planes. (two paintovers not included in the first link are here and here

    The teeth and nose in your piece feel a little off. The reason behind this, is depth. Always note that the nose comes forward farther than the rest of the head. When shading, take into account the direction of the light source - chances are the nose could make a cast shadow. The teeth don't feel settled within the skull. They need to be pushed farther into the mouth. Again shading can help a lot with that regard. The molars will get little light, while the incisors will get a lot more light. The upper lip could also form a cast shadow over part of the top row of teeth (depending on the direction of the light source). Defining every tooth equally often comes out looking a little odd. Again, check out how Marko handles teeth.

    Hope this helps

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    Wow, that's some really good advice from Havoc.
    Additionally, his head is really small and the way the trapezius is placed doesn't make sense.
    His head needs to be higher otherwise it looks like the trapezius attaches somewhere way to far up his skull.

    I second the suggestion on cropping. Also, if you include the arm you'll understand the foreshortening better yourself.
    If this is digital you can simply expand the canvas size and use freetransform to upsize his head.

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    Thumbs up

    Wow....this is some really good stuff. I really appreciate you taking the time to crit my stuff. I mean, including the links and everything...Jeez! I will make adjustments and repost.

    Y'know when I finally hit my stride and get the elusive CA 5 stars I'm going to give you a shout out Havoc.

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    I see what you mean about the Traps. I should have known better. Just got done studing the back muscles. I have to shake these old habits off. I used to draw by copying comics and was never able to get anywhere. I'm finally getting it into my thick head that I need to study from life etc. Everyday I draw I feel like I'm improving. Thanks for the feedback!

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