Sketchbook: Mr. X's Sketchbook (Practice, Practice, Practice)
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Thread: Mr. X's Sketchbook (Practice, Practice, Practice)

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    Icon Mr. X's Sketchbook (Practice, Practice, Practice)

    My name is Alex, I am a cellist and music teacher. I really love to draw and am trying to improve. Any help you can give is much appreciated. I just got Bridgman's book and another couple anatomy books and have just started in on it. Im ready to start drawing whole people instead of faces.

    I have worked through a Drawing Faces book. These are all done in pencil. Hopefully scanning quality will be better in the future.

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    A couple pages of Brigman amd Anatomy studies done yesterday and today. Moved away from the smooth shading for now, the scanner didn't pick it up to well.

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    Welcome to CA! I hope your artistic knowledge and skill exponentially grow and broaden while you're here.

    Cello, eh? I always wanted to a play a string instrument. I played trumpet instead. Anyways,

    I'm not too familiar with Bridgman's book. I read the first few pages and didn't like where it was going. Not to disrespect Bridgman or to devalue the teachings in his book, but it just wasn't what I wanted at that time. Although, what I did see in his book was a good deal emphasizing mass, volume, figure weight, etc. His figures sure have a sense of weight to them, and it reflects in your sketches.

    Your shading is...unique. It has a water color texture to it -- I'm surprised and interested about your shading technique (of course, I'm talking about the shading on the girl and the mouth in the grid).

    To set a good foundation, however, I would recommend staying away from shading for now. I would recommend you practice contour drawings, gestural drawings, textures: work on using only line first to create form.

    From there, do value patterning studies, which is where you no longer use line, but shapes of value to create form (without blending the shapes together). Doing this will help you to see the differences in value between one area and the areas surrounding it.

    Then, you can work with shading: chiaroscuro and the like.

    I wouldn't worry to much about anatomy until you can control line and value. A good way to go about line and value studies is with still life. I know it may sound boring, but those studies go by quick (because they're not suppose to be elaborate). Plus, the subjects in your still life are up to you. So, get some things that won't bore you (for me, that would be a chicken riding on a turtle's back ). But, be open and explore many different things from paper sacks to yams.

    The only reason why I suggest still life to you is because you don't need a model for line and value studies. Hiring a model would only waste your money since there's a cheaper and less frustrating method for doing such studies: still life. Sure, you can hire a model or draw people around you. But, it's best not to have someone fidgeting for line and value studies.

    Just try it out. It can't hurt ya to do line studies for a week or two and then value studies after that for a week or two.

    Also, grids are more for projects instead of sketches/studies. It's nice, though, to see that you know how to use them. But, time can be better used else where. I would also recommend lightly using something like a 6H-2H to draw your grid lines so that they erase better.

    So yea, I hope you enthusiastically try my suggestions and see where it takes you. You got a lot of potential.

    "Wigga Wigga Nutshire"
    "How many quarters are in a dollar?"
    "...half and half, kinda like the cream, but I don't like coughy..."
    My Sketchbook
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    Immortal: Thanks for taking the time to check out my SB and to leave such a detailed reply. The shading on the two drawings you mentioned were kind of washed out by the scanner, so they look a little different in real life. I agree I need to get the basics down, so the more drawing I can do the better. I'll definitely start posting some drawings from life, and take your suggestions to heart.

    (you should have went with the stringed instrument by the way )

    Here are few drawings done today: An eye/nose study, a stuffed animal of my sons, and a teapot. Any and all suggestions are much appreciated.

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    dcriler is offline Product Design Engineer Level 3 Gladiator: Catervarii
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    Great start, but what else can I say that Immortal didn't? He makes a ton of sense.

    Practice, practice, practice, draw everything you can...keep it up!

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    You need to start drawing what you are actually seeing instead of what you think you see. Slow down your drawing process and take the time to really document what an object looks like instead of your preconceived idea of what you think it looks like.

    Pay close attention to shape, line, value, and form. These are the cornerstones of good drawing. I wouldn't even attempt to study the human form until you get these basic concepts down pat.

    Like Immortal suggested, you should be doing still lifes until your hands and eyes hurt. Work from life as much as possible rather than resorting to photographs. You are definitely moving in the right direction.

    Books I'd recommend would be Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and (once you start on anatomy/human form) Anatomy Lessons From the Great Masters and Anatomy for the Artist. Keep practicing and you'll be amazed how fast you progress.

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    DCriler Thanks for checking out my SB. I'll keep it up.
    DeeLock Thanks for the advice...get ready to see a lot of random items from my house. I'll definitely take a look at those books.

    Let's see...a sketch of my wife and son sleeping, some eyes and other crap. Next are a few things around my house: Fortune cookie, crappy pencil sharpener, moose antlers, my foot under the sheet, a 10min portrait of my wife (she's looking down at my son). It looks a little like her

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    Throwing Bones

    Keep Up The
    Good Work

    We Get
    Better By
    Working
    Harder And
    Smarter

    Have An
    Outstanding
    Sketchbook
    Going Here

    Thanks For
    Stopping By
    My Thread
    And Feeding
    The Monkey


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    Self portrait in my "Pilot" hat (45min). I'am pretty happy with the results, it's not perfect though.

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    hahaaaaaaaaaa great keep doin it

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    Nice to see that you're doing stuff from life! Those still life studies are coming along. Anatomical stuff will come later. So don't get bogged down if you feel like you can't make a realistic representation of someone's face or body.

    A phenomenon occurs when artists take a break for about an hour or two and come back to the still life/drawing they've done and realize what's inaccurate. So, I'd suggest you do that if you feel you have the time.

    I think the recent self-portrait is a big improvement over the one you did the first time. In what manner? It could be a mixture of many different elements. I like the pilot hat, gives the composition some interest. The goatee and the mustache have a nice texture and give the composition some character (along with the hat). Ya know, the anatomy isn't that bad at all. And I think you did a good job of disguising some of the obvious flaws in the facial anatomy with the addition of the goatee and pilot hat. Good job!

    Keep it up,
    cheers!

    BTW - Mentler is an outstandingly awesome-ness artist and it's good to see that you're viewing his thread(s). You can learn a lot in them.

    "Wigga Wigga Nutshire"
    "How many quarters are in a dollar?"
    "...half and half, kinda like the cream, but I don't like coughy..."
    My Sketchbook
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