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Thread: Head Drawings, Oil Sketches, and Quick Poses

  1. #92
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    drawing info and a oil sketch

    Mydrako - Thank you. When approaching a drawing (or painting) I usually make a couple decisions before starting. There are different approaches for different 'problems' to solve in drawing and painting. I'll list a few ways of seeing the figure and a few technical approaches. When drawing you can look for: Long Lines, Gesture or push of the pose, major angles, common angles, Positive and Negative shapes, Large shapes......
    I usually start with 1) Head 2) Angle of shoulders 3) Angle of hips 4) Longest Line 5) Plant the feet and start knocking in negative shapes - dark shapes - construction of anatomy and so on.

    .........and there are technical terms like: do you want to use Line or Tone? Totally tonal approach versus a more line based construction, how do you want to use the Contours or Edges. Al these things are considered before starting and depending on what the model is giving you.

    Some poses are all about the lost and found edges and the positive and negative shapes, Some are more about the contour, some have strong shapes that lend themselves to going completely tonal (which I find harder).

    When learning to draw the figure it's a good idea to learn how to construct the figure, I suggest the Reilly method and variations there of, before getting too into technical approaches like completely tonal or hatchmarks.... stuff like that.

    Learning to construct the figure starting with 2 minute - 25 minute poses will train you to be selective in your 'seeing' and will force you to memorize construction and apply it to the model in a 'loose and free' way - rather than copying the model and being dragged around by what the model is doing. Well trained figurative drawers know what is going on with the construction and apply that knowledge to the model - rather than trying to figure out what the model is doing and just copying it down - there is a BIG difference.


    psychoboy - Thanks man! I'm all about the eyes.
    Last edited by Raileyh; May 6th, 2009 at 04:47 PM.
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  4. #93
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    Thats very informative. You lead me to think about alot of things I never thought about. I guess i have always been merely copying the model.

    Some last few questions before I shut up and go back to admiring your work. Do you have any comment on the more contour block-in approach (eg anthony ryder's approach). Is it different from your method which I assume is a variation of Reilly method or just a variation as well. Am I thinking too much trying to figure out a systematic method? (stupid left brain )

    Is there any good books on reilly method. There dont seems to be much info on his method beside the forbiddingly expensive dvd and some books from his students. Travel to US to study is unfortunately impossible right now Hope you can provide me some way to gain info on it.

    I think the problem with my self learning is that I am just going ard from method to method, and in the end confusing myself. Is Reilly method a good method to start with?

    Thanks for the response ! You and many other kind mentors in CA is the closest to a teacher I can get
    Last edited by JS Neo; March 13th, 2009 at 10:18 PM.
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  5. #94
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    The enveloping approach is an approach used in the Ateliers when approaching long sitting drawings - up to 10 - 12 weeks. They use sight sizing to get all the major landmarks down and the figure perfectly proportioned out onto the paper without making any unwanted marks, then they breakdown the 2 value statement and lay in the large masses of flat tones building very slowly. It's a great way to approach a fully rendered drawing and a good way to learn to gauge values.

    The Reilly method is a method used to learn how to break down the figure's construction into simple shapes and forms. Illustrators have used his methods to memorize construction. Most art students tend to learn to draw the figure starting with 2-5 minute poses on to 25 minutes - on to long sittings. Unfortunately, a lot of teachers fail to teach a clear method of breaking down the figure from the inside out - not just using the contour alone. There is a great freedom in being able to construct the figure without wholly relying on what the model is doing. Art students like to blame the model - but really there is never an excuse - even if the model moves.

    I'll post some handouts I have that breaks down some construction along with some ways to abstract the figure. There aren't any books that I know of that clearly teaches the Reilly method - it tends to get handed down through handouts and from instructor to student - which I kinda like, it's hands on. I suggest looking at other people drawings starting with their quick poses. It will greatly affect how you see.
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  7. #95
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    Thanks for that explanation, Hope. Looking forward to the handouts. In the meantime, do you think this link is any good? http://www.dhfa.net/Artiststatement2.html
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  9. #96
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    Thanks Hope for ur patient and effort to respond Looking forward to ur handouts and at the mean time, I will study ur drawing closely.

    courtyard Thanks for the link. I have seen it before but it is kinda confusing cos things are sort of fragmented and incomplete.

    Shall not hoard the thread any longer.
    -JS Neo

    "Choose only one master.. Nature. " Rembrandt

    "The only time I feel alive is when I'm painting." Van Gogh
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  10. #97
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    Simply beautiful work. I really like how loose but how precise your strokes are.
    I cant wait to work from live models.
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  11. #98
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    Drawing of Hannah and a figure drawing

    Here's a drawing of Hannah and a recent drawing from a workshop
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  13. #99
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    ^Beautiful drawings...may I ask how long these took you? Thanks in advance.
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  14. #100
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    What a sublime head drawing, Hope! Is that in graphite... charcoal... both? Thanks for sharing!
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  15. #101
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    That is so beautiful. I admire you greatly for that. And thanks for giving us the advice on the Reilly method. Never even thought of such things~
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  16. #102
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    Tonal head drawing

    Aaron909 - Thanks. The graphite/charcoal drawing took a few days, I still may work on it a bit more, and the tonal drawing is a few hours.

    sfa - thanks for stopping by. It's both graphite and charcoal.

    Aaron Death - Thanks. I try to take from multiple methods, they all become blended versions anyway.
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  18. #103
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    Like the shading underneath the tossed over hair.

    Her ear looks a little underdeveloped in the shading dept. Not saying it should be full on rendered, but maybe more of a hint of definition than the flatness going on right now.

    Might want to press the shading underneath her chin to give more depth of her head from her neck in space.

    THERE IT IS! (it was bugging me why) the very tip of the chin (to the right, mine or yours?) and the shading on the throat are so close in tone, that's what is causing the problem, to me anyway.
    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
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  19. #104
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    Sweet portrait, I love the way you handled the background, it really ties it together well.
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