Sculpting and Drawing skill!!
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Thread: Sculpting and Drawing skill!!

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    Question Sculpting and Drawing skill!!

    Hi,

    I'm wonder about effect of sculpting in drawing!

    I practice drawing a lot, from both references and imagination, but never understand human anatomy so good in details...

    one month ago I begin sculpting human anatomy from references, from skull to all bones, organs and muscles...

    Now when I'm trying to draw human anatomy, have different feeling, like I can imagine human body in 3-Dimensional and much more easily draw it!!!

    Is there any relationship between sculpting and drawing skills?!


    Thanks

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    Absolutely. many of the old masters were sculptors and painters.

    Drawing is, in many way, an attempt to fake sculpting on a 2D surface.

    One tip I've started giving new artists is to draw something after holding it in your hands for a while and exploring its weight, texture and form. So many drawing exercises implore the student to draw "as if feeling the form" with their eyes". Sculpting from the model is a valuable tool in improving your drawing skills. Many artists also scult little maquettes to draw from while working on some projects.

    ~Richard

    Last edited by rpace; September 15th, 2008 at 03:52 PM. Reason: wanted to add something else!
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    Thanks rpace for your feedback and tips...

    I visit your Sketch-blog too, I like your style and talent...

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    ...Sorry Double Post...

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    Most definently man!

    My dad is working on a sculpture now of a centaur fighting a bear. He works backwards sometimes, like he is now. You would think you would start with the painting first and then go for the sculpture, but seeing it in 3 dimensional form before painting can help tons.

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    Oddly enough, ever since I started painting using the hard brushes and not airbrushes, I have come to see painting as some sort of sculpting. You lay in your blocks, and then you try to "sculpt" the picture by putting shadows and lighting and tones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by psyphi View Post
    Is there any relationship between sculpting and drawing skills?!
    Absolutely! You've experienced it yourself, why would you doubt it?


    Tristan Elwell
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    Yes, it definitely does. Sometimes I have to make a rough model of something before I draw it in 2D to get a better idea of proportions and light/shadow. Also, I find that I understand the muscles better when I sculpt something. I sculpt a lot better than I draw, unfortunately.

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    Just to emphasis, yes, there is most definitely a strong relationship between drawing skill and sculpting.

    What I'm wondering is in which order do they go?

    I know that someone who can draw well would have a better time sculpting, but would an adept sculptors be a good drawer?

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    I love Elwell idea..."Absolutely! You've experienced it yourself, why would you doubt it?"

    In my personal experience, Sculpting open 3rd Dimension gate in my brain, for example I can understand each body muscle locations in 3-Dimensional space, understand it's form, shape, weight, softness, hardness, dynamics and relationship to other organs...

    Now after months of sculpting practice from anatomy references, I can even imagine my skull when looking at mirror, when I move my hand, I can imagine it's muscles and bones movements...

    and I notice learn anatomy from reference much faster, around 60% faster than drawing!!!

    I really fall in love with sculpting!!!

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    Dang... I should give this a shot.

    Any recommendations on a good place to start? As in, a full figure? Just a skeleton? A few bones? A full muscled arm?

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    Freaky...I was just talking to a co-worker about this yesterday!! I totally agree that there's a relationship!

    I only had one experience with sculpting a live model, for instance. But I could definitely FEEL the figure and get an idea of how her body was shaped and positioned. Where the shadows and light would show up...why my version crashed on the floor. -_- You know? It's awesome to experience that relationship!

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    Dear Noah Bradley, I don't know any recommendations, but I begin from human skull, then make muscles and skin over skull...after skull try chest and abdominal bones and build muscles and skin over it, and at last I go for hands, legs and fingers skeleton and build muscles and skin over it...

    I use lots of references...many books and downloaded images...

    I promise YOU HAVE LOTS OF FUN during sculpting from references, unlike frusting sketch practice from anatomy references...

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    I haven't progressed that far in my studies yet, but when I start drawing long figure poses at Atelier Stockholm, we're going to do small clay maquettes of the figure first, to get a feel for it, before we start drawing it.

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    Yes, sculpting certainly is understanding. I have a book on Rodin that has a few of his sketches. They are loose, but show the basics of his subject, in my mind, the most important. Sculpting lets you see your idea literally in reality, instead of rendering (drawing/painting) it on a flat surface.
    In general, though, I think that if you fully understand your subject's contours & form, your art will work no matter what medium is was made in. Rodin shows that even a rudimentary drawing can contain immense understanding of a subject. The trick is simply to study!

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    I'm reviving this thread as I'm having sculpting class nowadays and I want to get the most out of it. Been reading many posts on the forums from lots of people who say SCULPTING = IMPROVING DRAWING SKILLS SIGNIFICANTLY. This is equivalent to learning Yoga to improve your Karate! And many people see dramatic results in just weeks. I may be able to draw like the Greats by Dec 2010 if I pay attention during sculpting class. LOL

    1) Can anyone recommend any good book on sculpting for beginners? Something that will help you to "sculpt what you see".

    2) When sculpting, we follow the same method as drawing, right? "Sculpt what you see"? Follow the contours of the subject?
    My first sculpture of the human mouth came out looking like shit today. Sculpting is way harder than drawing.

    3) In order to improve my drawing skills, is there anything I should take note / observe during sculpting? Or will the improvement in drawing skills come naturally even if I anyhow sculpt without giving a damn?

    I'm using the reddish oil-based clay that looks very similar (exact) to this type: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...e_p1070141.jpg

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    "can someone sculpt better than he can draw ?"

    Yes. Not unusual at all. The manipulation of the different media requires different muscle use and a different hand/eye/mind coordination.

    AND...learning to sculpt seriously first after learning enough rudimentary drawing skills to allow you to sketch out guides on paper ALWAYS improves drawing skills afterwards. It doesn't always work the other way around for some strange reason, probably because your mind/hand coordination becomes set in a 2D rut of sorts. If I could, I would make teaching sculpting of some sort a requirement across the board for all elementary/high school students. It really does help with spatial skills in all fields.

    ADD: By sculpting here, I'm including/referring to folding and manipulating paper, clay, assembling sticks with string, carving soap maybe, playing with blocks and shapes, and even making simple toys and models from plastic, cloth, and wood or paper.

    Last edited by Ilaekae; August 24th, 2010 at 11:11 AM.
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    I've been reading about ecorche and found this site: http://ameralart.com/eSculpture.html

    According to this sculptor however, it's the complete opposite from what I'm hearing in this thread:

    keep in mind that students are doing a number of drawings of these features in conjunction with the sculpture. I tell my students that the sculpture is second in importance to the drawings. I learned anatomy 2 dimensionally. You will only sculpt the flayed figure as good as you can draw.
    So according to him you should learn to draw 3d form first before you sculpt it. So I'm confused. Does he mean just draw real objects and do still lifes so you can draw boxes, eggs, etc decently (along with real people), then start sculpting? Definitely makes sense.

    I do know (boy do I know) that not everybody learns the same way, believe me. But I respect the opinions of talented artists. It feels like there's a chicken/egg thing going on here...

    this is an exciting, interactive and ballin sketchbook sig

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    It's all one. Making art is complicated. Everything informs everything else.


    Tristan Elwell
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    Absolutely, I felt the same way too, as if sculpting 'opened' a door to the 3rd dimension. I always thought that alongside learning all the rules of perspective one should also sculpt because sculpting seems to build on the same intuitive 'sense' of perspective without the need for relying on mechanical rules. Instead of doing traditional cast drawings I also did cast copies, trying to replicate plaster casts in oil clay. I also did figure sculpture and ecorches. I'm not a great sculptor, but every time I go back to sculpting I notice a lot of 'aha' moments, as if a lot of bad drawing habits get 'realigned'. I think the medium change really weeds out things that have become crutches for drawing and brings you back down to the basics. For example certain shorthands that I might have been relying on too much for fingers or feet or things like that get dropped, because I no longer have access to those 'shorthands' when you change back and forth from 2d to 3d.

    Edit: wow, silly me, just noticed the original thread was started years and years ago... As for Cortes' question, it's probably best to start with whatever you'd feel most comfortable with and try out different things and go back and forth. A lot of drawing is also involved in sculpting, as far as establishing center lines and cuts and guides. I think what Ameral is saying is that if you don't know what a ribcage looks like to begin with you can't sculpt it. Drawing is just one of the ways to acquire and express that knowledge.

    Last edited by Cadaure; February 10th, 2013 at 10:00 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    2) When sculpting, we follow the same method as drawing, right? "Sculpt what you see"? Follow the contours of the subject?
    You shouldn't follow the contours even when drawing. Track the structure, not the contour.

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    I have had this experience as well, and I can tell you that it works just as well digitally. In my early twenties I had sort of given up on reaching my goals in drawing and took a degree in 3D modelling and animation. While I was learning 3D modelling and sculpting, I didn't do much drawing, and I was astounded when I began seriously drawing again and discovered that after three years of working with 3D my drawing skills had skyrocketed - even though I had barely drawn AT ALL during that time. Without realising it I had done exactly what I needed to do to resolve the plateau I had hit with drawing, because I gained far more understanding about anatomy, lighting and form creating the models than I ever did trying to draw from anatomy books, and because I spent so much time in the 3D software whizzing the camera around to look at my model from different angles, I had acquired the ability to turn objects around and examine them from different angles in my head. That was very powerful and nothing else has ever influenced my drawing ability so much.

    If anyone isn't sure where to begin with traditional sculpting or feels intimidated by needing the materials, you could consider downloading the trial of zbrush and some tutorials and trying that out (if you've never seen anyone working in zbrush, go on youtube and search for the name - you will be pleased by what you see, it's a very artistic piece of software). Like painting, there are certainly advantages to physically doing it with your hands, but digital sculpting is advantageous as well. It's less messy, having camera control is great and of course there are the usual digital advantages like being able to use layers, masks and so on.

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