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  1. #1
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    how do YOU start your drawings?

    I'm really stuck here.

    I don't know where to start! I usually start with the head so I can get the right proportions for the body but it always seems difficult to move down the body.

    also, how do you work out the correct proportions, placing and anatomy?

    I've tried the rib cage technique, the stick figure and I've even tried the geometric technique but none of them have really worked for me.

    I find it difficult to draw dynamic poses too... well actually, it's difficult for me to draw any interesting poses at all!

    help please.

    -trig

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  3. #2
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    Starting with the head is a good idea. Just keep in mind that from the head to the pit of the neck is equal to the ribcage , and that is equal to the pelvis. Try drawing 2 lines the height you want the figure to be, divide it in half and then you have how long the legs should be and how long everything else is, then if you divide the top half into thirds you have how large each mas, pelvis, ribcage , and head+neck have to be. The key to dynamic poses is to really understand how the 3 main masses are tilted. I hope this helped.

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    thanks! that did help.
    I'll be putting it into practice once my body wakes up

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  5. #4
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    I just throw down lines where I see objects in my head. If I see a big body leaning forward, I scribble a lot of lines where the body would be and then throw a couple of lines where I want the head.

    I find that the time it takes to sort out which is which and what goes where, I've lost my inspiration, or at least the initial idea I had. It helps to just get something down on the paper and go off that, at least for me.

    I can form the stick figure and building blocks later once I've got my idea on paper somehow.

    That's just me, though.

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  6. #5
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    a line

    coming from a traditional animation background I start my drawings with a line. Well usually an arc- this is your line of action...think of it as the spine. From there I make a oval for the head, then brach out (yes, like a stick man) the limbs to get the proportions...think of these lines as the bones. Then around the bones I draw three dimensional shapes which make up the muscle masses. So before I create any real details I have all the masses, shapes and proportions worked out (no point in making time consuming details to a character that is out of proportion). Does this make sense? Hope it helps- most important bit of advice would be to WORK FAST. It gives life to the lines which gives life to your character. Drawing from your arm and not from your wrist or fingers helps with this. Good luck!

    Mike Phillips
    www.mikephillips.ca
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    yeah thanks, DV8

    I've not tried doing that yet. I've done the action line tech and kind of the 3D shapes but I've not done a combo.
    I'll try all these techniques out after I'm done with this manip.

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  8. #7
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    I usually put dots at all the key height points, then I draw a shoulder line then a spinal line and from those(mainly the shoulder line) i draw the torso,then the pelvis then legs and arms and the head. Once i hav all the ovals and their preportions right then i start to accually draw it

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  9. #8
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    I usually spend hours just thinking up a pose...then I start with a circle for the head...A line to represent the spine, someother lines to represent the limbs and collar bone...I have the terrible habit of not quadruple-checking my sketches before inking, and I usually realize my proportions are all wrong when it's already too late!
    This probably isn't helpful at all except that maybe you can learn from my mistake. Look at every itty detail of your picture before doing anything you can't undo or erase. A quick skim-over will always leave you with mistakes you'll probably kick yourself later for.

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  10. #9
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    "test"

    a good way to test your drawings for proportion/correctness/perspective is to look at it in a mirror or hold the paper up to the light and look at the back of the sheet. you will notice errors you missed working on it normally. Do this before you take a sketch to any other level or you may just be wasting time

    Mike Phillips
    www.mikephillips.ca
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  11. #10
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    All of these techniques work. I especially like to hold my work up to a mirror... the brain does some funny "corrective" things, and the mirror will show them.

    Also, learn a number of diiferent proportion systems, and use them all at once. Forshortening can defeat them, however, and this is important if you're getting stuck with "action" poses. Foreshortening is a whole other animal.

    The "Classic" way to do things is to get the torso down first, and then the legs, then head, and finally, arms. This is effective because the figure must be supporting its weight, and doing, for instance, the legs last will give your figure a "floating" appearance.

    Learn a lot about how people stand and balance. Hang out with dancers and gymnasts, if you can. Draw figures in motion, very quickly. these "Gesture" drawings are amazing in what they can help you with. such drawings, donw in 10 seconds or so, force you to get down the essential information first, and trains your brain to ignore the rest.

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