do i have to learn how to paint?

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  1. #1
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    do i have to learn how to paint?

    hello everybody,

    I wanna ask everyone whats more important, a unique style or having the ability to paint (digitally). It seems the measure of a digital artist talent is the ability to paint, and paint realistically....

    People dont seem to be impressed unless its painted, with the skin tones and all that good stuff....

    Can i be considered a super artist if i dont know how to paint, and can people be successful...

    http://reyyyyy.deviantart.com/art/SHARKNIFE-1-22104402

    that guys has a pretty unique style, coming from graphic design background and he published a manga, i never seen him paint anything

    http://lastscionz.deviantart.com/art/the-Hunt-51796235

    chamba can draw anything with a pencil, and all his drawings resemble high end animation, takes cell shading to a new level

    and a slew of other people with very unique styles.. like people with graffiti backgrounds their artwork are so creative and random...

    so should i and can i just stick with my own style, and not feel pressured to be able to paint just to show ur good, alot of the cg artist with their paintings put the pressure out there i think, like we have to measure up to them. i for one dont want to paint and tried lots of times.... and usually i find the unique styles super impressive.

    what do u guys think?

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  3. #2
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    If you don't know the basics first (drawing and painting realistically), you won't be have the foundation needed to stretch the rules and develop your own "style". Simple as that.

    Honestly "style" is a vastly overrated concept, and you should simply try to improve your skills, not go chasing after some elusive "style" to define you. Style is what happens as you make more and more works and grow as an artist, not the other way around.

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  4. #3
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    here's a suggestion: don't make rules for who's a super artist and what qualifies them and all that. Do what you like to do. If you don't want to paint, don't. If you do, then start at the beginning and learn your basics.

    If you're asking questions like this, I'm going to also suggest that you not worry about "a unique style" any time soon. It finds you, not the other way around. Just do your thing the way you like to see it and do it the best you can.

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  5. #4
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    There are tons of artist who specialize in doing just a couple of things. There's guys who only draw, guys who only paint, guys who paint with oils and watercolors, but not acrylics, folks who sculpt, but can't draw to save their lives.

    It's just about what works for them, what their interests are and what kinda job they want to have. So if you don't want to paint, don't paint.

    The style thing, well, that's a different story. I mean, you're probably got a specific way that you write, but you probably didn't sit down and try to write like that. It just happened. Same with artistic style. It's just the way you do things. It happens on its own, so don't get caught up in trying to make your work look unique. It'll look unique all by itself. Just learn to draw, learn anatomy and shapes and perspective and then do your own thing.

    I'm gonna be honest, even with all that knowledge you're gonna be guessing most of the time unless you're using a reference.

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    thanks guys, ill stop painting yippie! feels liberating, and yes about the style, i was talkin about it like it was the endgame.. not to start out with.. of course ill learn anatomy and all the rules till the style pops out.. im not a super amateur artist..

    i was just lookin at those guys as examples of an end game.

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  7. #6
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    Chamba does paint occasionally...

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  8. #7
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    I'm going into my 4th year at Academy of Art University in San Francisco and up until this point I the only extensive painting class I've taken was Color and Design. That was with gouche. Which I hated.

    This year I'm taking two painting courses. Still Life Painting 1 and Introduction to Figure Painting. Both revolve around the use of Acrylics, and more gouche. This will be my 4th year like I said and I guess you could say I'm more "mature" about my education now than I was when I first started out at AAU.

    I was really apprehensive about learning to paint. The color theory concept actually intimidated me after going through Color and Design. And I need to brush up on it before I start my classes Friday. I've always been more of a charcoal/pencil/pen/black and white type of guy. That's what I've always liked. I'm not a big fan of color.

    That being said, I decided to take the optimistic approach and use this as a learning experience and dedicate myself entirely. Especially since I'm spending so much money on the classes and supplies. I know if I stick with it, it will make me a better artist. And I might learn to appreciate color theory more and perhaps not be so intimidated. So in essence, I'm looking forward to it.

    "And you will shed tears of scarlet."
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    Drawing and painting realistically are not the basics. I agree with you that among beginning artists the ability to paint realistically is over rated. You should learn as much about art as you can, if you consider yourself an artist. One way to look at painting is as "mass drawing", all that means is that instead of considering forms in space you look at the light and dark value shapes/surface areas and group them into an interesting pattern, like a puzzle, or a quilt. Heinrich Wolflinn's "Principle's of Art History" explains it quite well. It's an important concept, and you can't be said to know how to draw if you don't understand it. Different styles come about by placing differing levels of emphasis on different elements of art. If you know the elements of art - line, shape, value, edge, and how those interact with each other and within a rectangle(design and composition), you can create new styles, and copy other ones. There's also whole philosophies behind certain types of art, like chinese calligraphic painting(giving that as an example because I'm currently reading through Vernon Blake's "The Art and Craft of Drawing"). By throwing out whole concepts before understanding them you're only cheating yourself. You're style should change based on what you're drawing, you can't draw beautiful flowing lines on a bony old man, the same as you would on a beautiful young woman. The style is dictated by what needs to be communicated, whether that's a philosophical life outlook, or just the desire to show someone a cool image.

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  11. #9
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    I had my first painting true class (well I guess you could say second if you count Color and Design) last Friday. Things went..."ehhh". I believe I was actually in a class that required a prerequisite class before you take it. Well I have that prerequisite, it's just that it's the second class on my schedule this semester and I started the other class first due to the days I take classes.

    The first day was kind of rough. I think I'm going to actually refresh my mind on the "color theory" aspect tonight. Perhaps to lower my intimidating on the color world and give myself a little more confidence in terms of understanding certain aspects.

    I saw a few students who were obviously veterans of painting. Some of the work in my class was very impressive, and I admit it made my interest peak higher than it previously was.

    "And you will shed tears of scarlet."
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