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Thread: Tutorials????

  1. #1
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    Tutorials????

    Hey guys,
    Well I am looking really bad for some tutorials on making toys , soft toys to be more specific.... ..so I can get the basics down...atleast..
    If there are some out there that you pros know are good and if someone can bother enough to make some here....I would be so obliged....

    Btw I am 21 year old guy who loves toys.... hmm people aroud me think I am wierd..

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  3. #2
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    Looking through here may help you, and check out Peter Konig's tutorials. 28chealseaslater might have some of the process in her sketchbook, but I haven't really checked it out.

    Also, a single question mark will work fine.

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  5. #3
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    I did some research a while ago. I have no experience at all, so I'll proceed to shoot out of my arse:

    Here are some videos (I'm not gonna embed them since they're in multiple parts) about mold making and resin casting.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSH19...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kP1Nij-elyQ
    There are many of these kind of videos on YouTube. You can do this at home, but it's a lot of manual labor. The molds are often soft, meaning, you can have complex shapes and pry them out of the mold. You can use 2 component resin which seems to dry pretty fast. Apparently the detail level isn't that good, so it can be a good idea to keep shapes smooth. I don't think it would be possible to get near anything of Citadel miniature detail level this way, unless you start using professional casting stuff... like vacum /pressure chambers and stuff.


    ---

    This Japanese video describes how an anime figure is sculpted from idea to casting and painting. It's 9 parts and the action doesn't start until video 2. I found it very informative despite not understanding much of what was said.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5RpL8UBNWI

    ---

    I looked into plastic kit making as well, but it's very, very expensive (meaning you need to produce large quantities). Apparently making steel molds are the reason for this. These aren't worn as easily as many molds, but since they are hard you need to think about separation. The parts needs to go on a sprue with injection points placed so it fills well. Details must be a certain thickness (walls) because plastic shrinks, possible making the walls concave and wobbly. The parts might grip to the mold (vacuum perhaps) so square stuff like lego bricks are apparently slightly tilted in the mold or something. I'm not sure how lego does the hollow bits, but I suspect they use more than 2 mold faces. Corner sharpness is another thing to worry about. Apparently it's difficult (thus expensive) to do sharp concave corners inside the mold. They have a little robotic thing which carves the inverted shape into the steel. I don't think concave corners (in the mold) would be a problem though, because those can be sharpened because they stick out.

    ---

    CAD-CAM

    Then you can get a 3D printer. These have gone down in price a lot, but are still a big investment. You most likely need to polish up anything it spits out. It's probably the best to buy this service.

    You can make a 3D model yourself, but it's best to hire a specialist here too because they need to figure out a lot of technical stuff (unless you have a simple figure).

    ---

    Then there's a method where you make the mold, pour in stuff an rotate the mold while the stuff dries. This is called rotocasting. Maybe rubberducks are made this way.

    ---

    Last, designer/urban toys / vinyl figures has an artistic value that equals that of double gradient filled smileys and easter eggs. Also, they remind me of the stupid little deviant art mascot, every one of them. End rage.

    Last edited by Prometheus|ANJ; September 2nd, 2008 at 07:28 AM. Reason: typo
    Jamen jag tror att han skäms, och har gömt sig. Vårt universum det är en av dom otaliga spermasatser som Herren i sin självhärliga ensamhet har runkat fram för å besudla intet.
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  7. #4
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    There's this awesome site with lots of process threads. It's written in japanese (I'm guessing) thou, but the pics themselves tell a lot about his method. Just click everywhere in the forum and you'll find the goodies
    http://homepage2.nifty.com/~zan/nekoban/z_making.htm

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    wow I love the tutorials and may try some. Thanks.

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  13. #8
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    I only can think of one site that I've found tutorials. The things they make are sort of cheesy but it'll give you a good idea on how to make your own.
    Here's a link that links to a bunch of different tutorials: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=140343.0

    Also I have the book Plush o rama rama which has tutorials & patterns to make your own, & its awesome. The Softies book is good too. There's a lot of others too I just don't remember the names. Even doll making books are helpful, and embroidery books. That's how I taught myself, haha

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  15. #9
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    Cheap seamstress trick:
    Old soapbars that have gotten really thin and too brittle for the bath can be used to trace on fabric. Usually medium to dark ones but if you are careful, anything that's not white (or green if you use Irish Spring...eww.) Glycerine soap doesn't work.
    Basically, you just let your old soapbar dry for a few days away from the bathroom and you use the edge to trace on the fabric.

    The good thing is it washes out easily and won't stain. You can also buy chalk or wax tracers in fabric stores, but then they will cost you something and you might be upset if you drop them and they shatter in chalky powder.

    For white fabric you can use graphite because it doesn't bleed, but it doesn't wash off very well either.

    You usually want to trace on the back of the fabric anyways.

    -------------
    You can also buy colorful waxy carbon paper in fabric stores that go with a blunt pinwheel. They are also used to transfer patterns on fabric and exist in many colors + white. The spiky sharp pinwheels are used to transfer a shape from fabric to paper (after you do some fitting, you can make a new pattern that incorporates the changes) and are used on a corked tabletop.

    I'll try to drop by and give sewing tips when new stuff comes to ming.

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    More patternmaker tricks

    If you are serious about learning to make fabric toys, learning to use a sewing machine is really important, else it's like drawing with crayons because you don't want to learn how to use a paintbrush, and you often have moms, aunts or grandmothers who can teach you! Dig up that knowledge before it disappears!

    Making a pattern for sewing, be it for toys or clothing or cushions is really just advanced geometry so it helps to remember that when designing a toy.

    Starting with simple flat shapes (where two identical shapes are sewn together) is ideal to start and then upgrading to more complicated shapes like pyramids and cubes. You usually want to sew the pieces with the right side of the fabric inside so that when you turn the piece over, the seems are hidden. When you do that, you leave a small hole in an inconspicious place to be able to turn the piece right side out and you sew that small hole shut later by hand.

    Also, sewing corners and sharp curves is harder and often yields poorer results than sewing straight lines and short curves so when you put your pieces together, think ahead how you want to proceed to avoid unnecessary corners and sharp curves, I have attached an exemple of a bad and a good way to assemble a pie-like shape.

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