Digital painting techniques (blending colors) - Which one to use??

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    Digital painting techniques (blending colors) - Which one to use??

    Well I am just learning some digital painting in Photoshop... and I found several digital painting styles, most popular being smudge style where you use smudge tool in Photoshop to create smooth transitions between color, and other style where you don't use smudge tool but making those transitions only with brush tool with different variations on brush color and opacity...

    So which of those two styles can you recommend me as a better one and why? Which one do you use? I tried both but still not sure which one should I stick to, and what is the difference in results...

    So I just need some tips on coloring those transitions after putting some rough colors... Any tips much appreciated...

    Thanks )

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    I use my option key and pick up the variations between the colors, and have my brush presets set with other dynamics. Hardness depends on what I'm doing, though. I also haven't been using photoshop for art until recently. I was drawing for a long time, and used photoshop for my photography; I'm still learning. I'm glad I had PS when I decided to start working toward digital arts, it would be one more thing I would have to buy and I was able to use a lot of the skills I had before.

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    From what I've seen, most people newer to digital painting tend to overuse the smudge tool.

    I suppose the temptation is there because a lot of natural media doesn't blend as readily, so the ide of blending all pixels without worrying about any "dryness" of paint seems like a dream come true.

    But that dream turns into a nightmare when the piece starts to look muddy and dead. But those subtle signs of overlapping where the painter used lower opacity and a lot of color-picking add life and sparkle to paintings, so stick to that.

    Also, set opacity variance to "pen pressure" so you can change your opacity more intuitively.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdoe2 View Post
    Well I am just learning some digital painting in Photoshop... and I found several digital painting styles, most popular being smudge style where you use smudge tool in Photoshop to create smooth transitions between color, and other style where you don't use smudge tool but making those transitions only with brush tool with different variations on brush color and opacity...

    So which of those two styles can you recommend me as a better one and why? Which one do you use? I tried both but still not sure which one should I stick to, and what is the difference in results...

    So I just need some tips on coloring those transitions after putting some rough colors... Any tips much appreciated...

    Thanks )
    Get used to using a hard round brush only. Lower the opacity for blending and eyedrop much like GhostValkyrie to get blend results. To get softer transitions lower the Flow setting on the brush which will help you blend. Increase the flow when you want harder edges. Master that one brush using those settings, then move on to the smudge tool to refine "selective areas to blend instead of all over the place.



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    My advice would be stay away from the smudge tool. Not only will it give you bad results, but will also seriously hamper your progress.

    I say block in your colours first, and then reduce your brush size and paint in lower opacity. Use the alt key like crazy, paint and resample.

    This is a thread by one of the CA monster artists, Min:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=107217

    Post#1 and post#3 should help.

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    Do not rely on the smudge tool...pick up the variations between colors, lower the opacity, and use the smudge tool only if you need too.

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    I use smudge tool.. but NOT to blend.. more like a smeary look but other than that.. it's not very useful as far as painting goes.. I've always treated it more like a tool.. for an effect.

    useing smudge tool to blend is as said here.. not a good way to go on about painting in photoshop.. it can really get rather dull and messy.

    colour picking is most widely used method and probably easiest to deal with. But there are many artists who don't realy on blending.. but just putting down the right colours flat. it really depends on what works best for you I suppose. Experiment, but try and leave smudge tool out of it and go for simpler approach.



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    Quote Originally Posted by bumskee View Post
    I use smudge tool.. but NOT to blend.. more like a smeary look but other than that.. it's not very useful as far as painting goes.. I've always treated it more like a tool.. for an effect.

    useing smudge tool to blend is as said here.. not a good way to go on about painting in photoshop.. it can really get rather dull and messy.

    colour picking is most widely used method and probably easiest to deal with. But there are many artists who don't realy on blending.. but just putting down the right colours flat. it really depends on what works best for you I suppose. Experiment, but try and leave smudge tool out of it and go for simpler approach.

    If you dont mind me asking, is that the tool you are using in this painting: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/att...1&d=1311398858

    The smudge tool? I notice you are smearing your colors around nicely, but can't tell if that's even photoshop in that painting. I'd love to know the secret

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  14. #9
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    artzealot, it's the smudge. it's all done in photoshop. I suppose the best result is to treat it as an effect and not the sort of smudge you normally associate it with. just make sure you have a solid painting before start smudging and do it moderately I suppose.

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