Art: cast drawing help

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  1. #1
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    cast drawing help

    hi, i am eager to do cast drawings or barque drawings, so i can really understand form better. what kind of materials are being used for this kind of drawings? do i need a setup with lights and stuff, or can i do it from a photo? anybody knows a good site where things are explained further? i actually have seen a couple of hyperrealistic drawings, and i dont really know how it is to be done.

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  3. #2
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    You do Bargues from plates given in Bargue-Gerome drawing course-- you need to have the book itself or very good copy of any separate plate to draw from.

    Cast drawings should be done from life, not from photos, which requires actual access to cast-- it needs not to be something complicated, you can start with simple geometric figures for example.

    Bargue course serves as a sort of preparation to begin with cast and life drawing, to train your eyes for abstract shapes and planes of light, and exact measuring. You can do it in charcoal or pencil.

    A good place to start would be here: http://www.learning-to-see.co.uk/bargue-drawings

    Also, a friend of mine did some demos on Bargue at TSOFA:
    http://tsofa.com/viewtopic.php?p=9880&highlight=#9880

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    Both have great advice. I would say, however, that while it is important to do them accurately, its also important to do a lot of them. This develops a nice repertoire of form and poses in ones head for future paintings. So, set aside a few to copy as closely as possible, and do the others more generally, to gain experience in simplification, the classical ideal, and the development of gesture.

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  5. #4
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    Bargues are copies.. they are drawings by Charles Bargue. You copy them to understand that values take a specific shape on an object. Its supposed to help you see these shapes better when working from life. Cast drawings arent copies because you need an actual cast. You dont have to start with complicated Greek statues, anything thats white will start you off right. Eggs are good to practice for a while. And yes you need a light source. Form lighting is recomended which is a 3/4 lightsource. If you buy a cast, its probably good to do a bunch of drawings of it with the light in a different position.. and possibly even different brightness. This will help you to see how light affects the way you see the object, how hard/soft the edges are, etc. The reason to use a white a cast is that its way easier to see the values because they will be completely neutral.. or damn close. When you draw a nude model your dealing with skin tone and wayyy more complicated plane changes.

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