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  1. #1
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    Never finish?

    I never seem to finish any drawing - invariably at some point during the creation, the lines refuse to resolve into something that looks more like an object or creature than a ball of hair or propped up dung pile.

    Part of me wants to push - it'll be lousy, but at least I'll have finished something.

    The other part says, go back to sketch sketch sketch until you can make the lines look right, and I abandon the stinky mess of a 'final' composition.

    I know I should do both, but I just can't seem to bring myself to finish something that just looks terrible.

    Should I do it anyway, just to get in the habit of completing things?

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  3. #2
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    I looked at your sketchbook. Maybe compromise both yelling parts with very wide pencil and start to use side rather then tip? If so, line will be replaces with wide strokes representing shapes. Work from large to small, from overal shapes to details. In other words loosen your work And generally try to work in larger format, it helps to learn.

    Drawing should look finish at any stage. At any moment you should be ready to walk away and not be ashamed of your drawing, whatever 5 minutes or 5 hours. Thats the goal, easy to say, difficult to master, but worth to try.

    Hope that helps,

    K.Polak

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  5. #3
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    I did for you very quick example with pencil. As you see there is not realy lines, just blocks of shades and gradients and so there is a form, I hope ;-) It could be done with thin lines as well, by hatching technique for instance, but thats different story.

    Cheers,

    K.Polak

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  6. #4
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    I could have sworn we just had this discussion.


    Tristan Elwell
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  8. #5
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    Thanks, both. I did take a look at the other thread, and the advice given there.

    Krp - you're totally right, I get frusterated and 'tight' - have to work on keeping the lines loose, rather than scribbly.

    I've been carrying around a bitty sketchbook with me everywhere, I'll take pictures of some stuff tonight.

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