Subject is it's own light source?
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Thread: Subject is it's own light source?

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    Subject is it's own light source?

    What I got here is a work in progress for a scholarship competition. The goal is to do three different images relating to fantasy or science fiction. My subject, a female character and her pet Solaris Tiger, makes me a little nervous. I'm not sure how to go about lighting the stone around them.

    The tiger is supposed to be made of stone, where the stripes are cracks in the surface and the fire seeps through. (Like slag or magma, I guess you could say) So he's not totally made of fire. Would he still cast a shadow?

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    Would a meteor cast a shadow? If it was flying towards the earth.

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    maybe you could use faint shadows to pronounce edges, cracks, and figure... but keep the whole think glowing.

    why not search for other fictional glowing subjects?

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    The short answer is yes. It would cast a shadow.

    Have you ever been in a brightly lit room where there are multiple light sources, im very sure you would have. Did you notice how you have multiple shadows?
    It is the same thing, just that one of those lights happens to be coming from your object.

    The shadow would exist, but depending on the brightness of your glowing thing is how visible this shadow is.

    If anyone more experienced knows more please pipe up, id love to hear it.

    Excuse the crappy diagram.


    EDIT: Perhaps this pic can help:
    http://balthaser.deviantart.com/art/Orbs-31375402

    Last edited by Muz; June 8th, 2008 at 05:49 AM.
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    Hey there,
    I agree with Muzzoid in that the tiger would have a shadow, but only if there is a second light source that isn't the tiger. It seems to me that your saying the tiger is emitting light, and from your image it looks like the tiger is the only light source.

    If the tiger is the only light source, and the light the tiger was emitting was "ambient" (evenly distributed everywhere) than the tiger would not have a shadow, just like a bare light bulb does not have a shadow. However, in the effect your describing, where the tiger is made of stone and light is seeping out from it's core through cracks in it's skin, the light would not be ambient but would instead act like a bunch of spot lights projecting the shape of the gashes in very specific directions.
    Imagine closing your fingers around a light bulb with your fingers slightly spread apart to let light through. The shadows that would be cast would reflect the shapes of your fingers where they were blocking the light.
    So, since the tiger is essentially "wrapped" around the light source, he would be casting shadows in all directions, wherever light was not being allowed through by the cuts.

    Now, realistically this would leave your scene very dim, since objects could only be hit by light if they were directly in line with one of the beams. Meaning there wouldn't be enough ambient light to see much of the female figure and probably not enough to see the skeletons at all. If you choose to represent the tiger the way you described I would suggest adding a torch or some kind of second light source somewhere to give you the ambient light you need to render the scene, and then plot the light the tiger is generating on top of that.

    Boy...hope that all makes sense...Rock on!

    Last edited by Mute; June 8th, 2008 at 07:30 AM.
    ...my humble and uneducated opinion.

    -Nate
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    cant wait to see how it comes out

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