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  1. #1
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    Anyone have a nautilus composition overlay?

    I've googled the nautilus composition overlay and the best i can get is a 640 by 480ish sized diagram it. Does anyone have anything bigger? I know that painter includes it but i'm stuck on photoshop which has nothing of the sort. thanks.
    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
    --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear

    Check out my Sketchbook! Critique and Criticism welcomed.

    or my Artstation

    Or my stream on Twitch! http://www.twitch.tv/wwsketch


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  3. #2
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    scale it up and redraw it? shouldn't take very long. And making it yourself might even teach you a thing or two.
    Last edited by m@.; May 28th, 2008 at 05:24 PM.

  4. #3
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    Yeah i think i'll do that in the meantime. I suppose the pen tool should work alright. I'm just being lazy again...
    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
    --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear

    Check out my Sketchbook! Critique and Criticism welcomed.

    or my Artstation

    Or my stream on Twitch! http://www.twitch.tv/wwsketch

  5. #4
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    I took M@'s advice and made my own. I thought i'd share it with the world since one this big is hard to find even on google images. Enjoy.

    [Edit] it wasn't 100% accurate. The edges of the curve in several places didn't touch the outside of the box. But i fixed it.
    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
    --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear

    Check out my Sketchbook! Critique and Criticism welcomed.

    or my Artstation

    Or my stream on Twitch! http://www.twitch.tv/wwsketch

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  7. #5
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    I've already seen this a thousand time in composition threads, but what is it supposed to be used for?


    edit: Im pasting it anyway!

  8. #6
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    It's a ratio of proportions that some believe to be inherently cool looking and often found in nature. Very old theory.

    Google "golden ratio" , "Phi" and "Fibonacci spiral" for more info.

  9. #7
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    actually i no a few things about it (being somewhat everywhere in nature, the literal translation for the french term is something like "the golden number") but actually i was wondering how it was supposed to be used (my first post was inacurrate).

    Heard some painters had the golden ratio in their paintings eventhough they were unlikely to have consciously used it.

    However having it overlayed on ones painting might be handicaping, dont u think?


  10. #8
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    Could be, could be just instinctive. There's a really interesting section in Harold Speeds "Practice and Science of Drawing" where he discusses this very issue.
    It's copyright expired, draw your own conclusions.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14264

    Edit: it's also a totally awesome book that's well worth reading anyway, his text on oil painting also rocks hard.
    Last edited by Flake; May 28th, 2008 at 10:31 PM.

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  12. #9
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    The one on wikipedia is 900 some pixels big and has 2 more boxes than yours!

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Oaksford View Post
    The one on wikipedia is 900 some pixels big and has 2 more boxes than yours!
    I'll probably be updating this tomorrow, in that case. I want this thing to be dead on.

    I think it's pretty usefull. I mean i don't live by it but when i'm unsure where to put details at or when my focal point is getting lost in my environments i'll overlay it and it kinda helps me bring things together.

    I'd be interested to know more about the history of it though. I wikipedia-ed the Fibonacci numbers and just got a bunch of equations. does anyone know more?
    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
    --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear

    Check out my Sketchbook! Critique and Criticism welcomed.

    or my Artstation

    Or my stream on Twitch! http://www.twitch.tv/wwsketch

  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtZealot View Post
    I'll probably be updating this tomorrow, in that case. I want this thing to be dead on.

    I think it's pretty usefull. I mean i don't live by it but when i'm unsure where to put details at or when my focal point is getting lost in my environments i'll overlay it and it kinda helps me bring things together.

    I'd be interested to know more about the history of it though. I wikipedia-ed the Fibonacci numbers and just got a bunch of equations. does anyone know more?
    the equation is:
    F(n) = F(n-1) + F(n-2) with F (1) = 0 or 1 and F(2) = 1

    It means that Fibonacci number n (the nth number in the Fibonacci sequence) is equal to the sum of the two number that came before it.

    As an example (with F(1) and F(2) = 1) here is the first number in the sequence that you would need to calculate on your own:
    F(3) = F(2) + F(1)
    That's the equation that creates the series but with the first real values that you need to calculate. As F(1) and F(2) are both one you get this:

    F(3) = 1 + 1 = 2

    So F(3) = 2

    In short: you just add up the last two number to get the next in the sequence. The part about F(1) being 0 or 1 is just a different starting point (0 or 1) and does not change this sequence:

    The sequence for F(1)=0 looks like this:

    0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 and so on

    And for F(1)=1 you get:

    1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 and so on

    If you divide a Fibonacci number by the preceding one then you get very near to the golden ratio (~1,618 ). And the bigger the Fibonacci numbers used are the better the approximation is.

    Golden ratio: (A+B) / A = A / B = ~1,618

    A = 1,618 * B

    B = A / 1,618

    So if you want something to have a golden ratio and already have one fixed number then you can use these equations to get the other one. A is the bigger one of the two so for if you replace B in the upper equation with your given number then you get a bigger number for your second value in the ratio and you replace A in the second equation then you get the corresponding smaller number for your ratio.

    You could (for example) use a set of A and B in the golden ratio to design a building that doesn't look too thin or too fat. Or use them as a starting point for an exaggeration.

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