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Thread: I want to breathe art!

  1. #1
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    I want to breathe art!

    Edit: I do like food.

    okheregoesmysketchbook,Isuppose.
    Don't hesitate to criticize my stuff!
    I would really appreciate it.
    Last edited by FearSelf; November 22nd, 2008 at 07:38 PM.
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  3. #2
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    a detailed figure studies I did for class. Uh I didn't really pay attention to backgrounds, so you must excuse the lack of background.
    I don't know what happened with the sketches. Prolly thrown away...
    Attachment 387834
    Last edited by FearSelf; September 28th, 2008 at 10:13 PM.
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  4. #3
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    Oh yea I guess I need an introduction. Right now I'll just go by Fear, I'm just a High School student. Next year I'm taking AP art, my senior year. I am all for harsh crits. in the end it will make my work stronger, so please don't hesitate.
    Last edited by FearSelf; November 22nd, 2008 at 07:39 PM.
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  5. #4
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    Woo charcoal!

    Attachment 390119
    I didn't know what I was going to do when I picked up the charcoal, and I still don't know what I did.

    Attachment 390120
    It's meh doggy I only got to sketch him for a little bit before he moved.

    Attachment 390121
    This took me about 3 hours, I think, I lost track of time. I am kinda proud of this, but now that I look at it again I see so many things I need to change. Ah well. What do you think of the background? I'm not sure if I should change it or not, it doesn't really seem to help the picture.
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  6. #5
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    woo! someone else who uses watercolors! (which I'm really digging btw).

    I'd have to say that my favorite piece is your first one with the girl on the cliff. It really stands out to me in terms of texture, color, vibrancy, composition, and plain old interest. The girl's head's actually too big and her arms don't match up perfectly but I really think that's irrelevant in that painting. You gave it a collagy feeling of whimsy that rendered staunch realism and other such nuances irrelevant in that case. If she was anatomically correct I really feel that as is it would detract from the piece instead of add. ...wow I should move on, haha.

    Your watercolor pictures here really do stand out in this thread. It just looks like you've got more confidence with them than you've got with charcoal. Overall your charcoal work comes out a little muddy. You don't need to smudge everything and make it smooth. I had a teacher freshman year in high school, she wasn't actually much of a drawing teacher but really a jewelry teacher who had to take over the drawing classes after they laid off the actual drawing teacher >_>, but she wouldn't let us smudge any of the pencil in our work, at least when she was looking. A lot of kids thought it was bs and disregarded it but I'm a pansy rule follower and didn't go around bucking her silly rules. The thing was she was actually right about it. Many of the kids in the class were smudging the pencil to get that nice smooth shading but they had ended up using it as a bit of a crutch and by being forced to not use it anymore they, or at least I, came to realize that and instead build up tones the good old fashioned way and came out better for it. Smudging isn't useless, it has its place, but you should cultivate your skills at various ways of using the medium and tackling the problem of presenting an image on paper with mere ash. By using and discovering different approaches you can learn where to use and combine them for the maximum effect for each work.

    Ok, a more specific crit: Your picture with the lady in the rocking chair, in it she doesn't really relax into the chair. Her back and the back of the chair are on entirely different planes and it looks like she's about to get up by the angle of her back and shoulder while her arms and legs tell that's she's relaxing in the chair and they contradict each other. Don't be so stiff, loosen up, and don't worry so much.

    Right now I feel that you would benefit more by focusing a little less on rendering out full pieces with light and shade and instead work some on your straight up drawings particularly of living animals and figures, you're last ones are just looking so stiff, you could really stand to loosen up right now. Don't be afraid to take chances and make mistakes. It's the best way to learn and discover. And besides it's not like the whole world's judging your every move so don't draw like they are. I don't want to sound all high and mighty and preachy about all this but it's something I battled so much with in the fall and winter. I realized that I had been keeping myself in a box when it came to my art. I'm just an overachieving neurotic perfectionist, especially in my art, and realized how much it had been hurting me, though, to be honest it was helpful at times, but everything has its place, and that it all just wasn't worth it. And I am seeing those tendencies which I saw in my art when I was in that box in your art here, so that's what this big paragraph tried to explain I suppose.

    Oh, and on your last pic, that still life, you're absolutely right about the background. It's just muddy smoke that doesn't do anything for your subject or complement it or whatever it is that you want it to do. Do more of that self crit stuff to. Ask yourself what's helping your pictures and what's dragging them down. Even if you don't bother to go back and change them you'll be that much the wiser and enlightened next time around the bend.

    geez... maybe I should just right a book while I'm at it... -_-;;
    well, peace out :D
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  8. #6
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    Wow, thank you Lizzybeth. =D
    I only have one watercolor in here which is the little girl, the rest are markers and water although I suppose it's the same concept.

    I will keep that in mind not to go smudge crazy, although it is fun and messy...I think I'm going to try making a piece without smudging at all. That'll be interesting.

    What do you think I could do to make the background look better? Just one uniform background either black or white?

    Oh yea and I just really hate how I did the girl in the chair charcoal piece I did. The girl was sitting stiffly in the chair, and kept shifting around so I kept messing up. It's just bleh.
    Last edited by FearSelf; June 12th, 2008 at 08:41 PM.
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  9. #7
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    First things first, nice sketchbook! I seriously love the way that a good amount of your work seems to tell a story, keep that up!

    I saw you on the Ringling thread, how you said you needed a crit on the last charcole piece you posted. Here goes, I suck at this so bear with me! The dark background is not working , it really detracts from the subjects so lighten it up, try to work for a wide range of tones rather than the ultra dark. A good way to do this is to look at some black and whit photography, this will help you with your tonal composition. The rendering is especially good on the right side form. As for the mug you can definately tell that it has a stainless steel texture going on. The glass jar on the left seems to be where the problem lies. While its wicked awesome that the image bends behind it, the specular highlights seem very off. With glass the highlights will be much sharper as theres less room for the light to scatter so sharpen them up a bit.

    Also for working with charcole i suggest picking up a paper stump, they are cheap they totally kick ass and they allow to really push the charcole around, making it easy for you to taper off shadows and tones.

    Sorry if this was extremely disjointed im on break at work and trying to write this up quick! Also just to let you know that clothed figure study is pretty sweet, you really did a great job in capturing the pose and its got some style.

    Once again, I don't have any art training so this is just what came to mind while looking at the piece.
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  10. #8
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    I'm not really a background expert my self... but I'd go with a dark black background, I think it would set it off a bit more. But not solid black, just mostly black with some dark grays mottled in on the edges and such to break it up some. I've recently noticed that solid backgrounds don't look nearly as good as something that, while it is generally the same, is broken up a bit. When you've got straight up solids it stands out an it's own which isn't what people usually go for with backgrounds.
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  11. #9
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    Hey! You said in the other thread you'd like comments on that last charcoal piece.

    The background looks like it was a little rushed... it needs something more to it. (I think Lizzybeth said something similar already.) It would be neat to see the edge of a table in the background, or at least some indication of what kind of surface the objects are sitting on. Fabric? Wood? etc.

    Also, maybe you shouldn't link your sketchbook with the words 'poorly done'. I know it's hard not to devalue your own work, we all do it... but don't tell strangers your work sucks before they even get a chance to look at it. Be humble without putting yourself down. Your work isn't poor, it's just growing.
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  12. #10
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    haha, I love that jimboslutstien and I totally disagree on the background. It's awesome. It's a good reminder to not listen to everything you hear and read. You're the artist and ultimately decide what's works best for you.
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  13. #11
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    I think darkness or lightness won't really help... I'd just like to see more information conveyed about the surface the items are on, regardless of whether or not you go with a darker background or a lighter one.
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  14. #12
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    Thanks for all the input.

    jimboslutstein- Yea I noticed the background was just ruining the picture even more, I'm still not sure what to do with it. XD
    I didn't realize glass reflections where sharper, I guess I wasn't paying good enough attention. About the paper stump I do have some, but I think I'll stay away from them for now because I smudge too much as Lizzybeth said. But yea if I smudge I should use those.

    Lizzybeth- Thanks for the input on the background, I don't like solid backgrounds either. I may or may not go darker, or I'll just start over and try again but from a different perspective.

    Cheesecakebree- Putting something in the background is a good idea. It seems so simple. I think I'll try that. I guess I should change the link 'Poorly done', to er 'Growing sketchbook'. Thanks. ^^
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  15. #13
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    I just did this one really quickly while my brother was playing a video game. He wouldn't hold still long enough to do his face accuratly so I decided to give him a mohawk. =D

    oh and I think I'll just start a different still life, and put everything I've learned from you guys in it. I can only look at something so long.

    Attachment 390250
    *cough*ignore the lack of ear*cough*
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