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  1. #1
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    Do you have to be creative?

    I like to draw, and I want to develop my ability but the problem is that I really suck at drawing anything from my mind. Even simple things like animals. I can see them, although they are not massively detailed, but there seems to be a broken link between my head and putting them on paper. Is this really needed to become a great artist? Or am I wasting my time?

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  3. #2
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    Creativity is a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it gets. Everyone has to start somewhere.

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  4. #3
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    when you start drawing it's *always* hard to put what's in your head to paper.

    hell, i still can't do it properly. :/

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  5. #4
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    No one sees a complete Image, and no you are not wasting your time, draw from observation The more you draw from life you start making a mental library of images after a while drawing gets easier because you can acess all these things in your head

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  6. #5
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    What appears in your head is just unclear impression of image. Those real tangible images are everywhere around you. Get to know them for a while and you'll be able to combine this memory with your imagination.

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  7. #6
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    I've been brain-dead for 53 years, and I can still fart out a decent idea once in a while. That must prove something...

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
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  8. #7
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    There's a big market for scientific illustration, at least in Europe. No one wants to paint animals, organs and stuff like that. The downside is that you have to be really, really accurate in what your draw and how you draw something. If that isn't a problem, do some research on the topic. It's not all 3d-modeling, there still is need for someone painting the images for encyclopedias.

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  9. #8
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    I think you're confusing creativity with the ability to accurately draw from memory. Creativity is creating concepts and ideas. Drawing from memory is making realistic representations of things based on stored information (as well as creating fantastic creatures and environments based on the same stored information). Either one can be developed from frequent use and exercise. The trick to drawing from stored information is that you first have to store it. This takes years of consistent study and practice working from life and observation.

    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

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  11. #9
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    I have the same problem as you hiiam, I can draw great from reference but ask me to draw even a simple thing from my mind and I'm lost...

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  12. #10
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    My experience has been like this: When you get better, you stop having images in your head and you just follow the lines your hand makes on the paper. At this point, you've given up on a preconception of what it is you're going to draw and started giving in to making the decisions as they become necessary.

    You'll still have ideas, but when you're drawing *enough* they just don't rule your life. It's like you're drawing so much it just kinda comes out.

    That still doesn't mean I or most people can still draw whatever they want, it's just funny how I think utterly different to how I used to.

    Slash is right - draw every day and look at different stuff a lot and it'll come. Having said that, I still know some people who are amazing artists who just don't have amazing ideas. So I guess there's apples and oranges huh?

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  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavePalumbo View Post
    I think you're confusing creativity with the ability to accurately draw from memory. Creativity is creating concepts and ideas. Drawing from memory is making realistic representations of things based on stored information (as well as creating fantastic creatures and environments based on the same stored information). Either one can be developed from frequent use and exercise. The trick to drawing from stored information is that you first have to store it. This takes years of consistent study and practice working from life and observation.
    This. 100%

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  14. #12
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    I agree with slash, everyone is creative to a certain extent, the more you practice the more creative you get?

    I found this quote on Dice tsutsumi's website (he's awesome)
    “Don’t worry about your originality. You could not get rid of it even if you wanted to. It will stick to you and show you up for better or worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do”
    – Robert Henri

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  15. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty C View Post
    My experience has been like this: When you get better, you stop having images in your head and you just follow the lines your hand makes on the paper. At this point, you've given up on a preconception of what it is you're going to draw and started giving in to making the decisions as they become necessary.
    Totally true, I've noticed the same change in my process over the years.

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  16. #14
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    [sorry for my bad grammar]

    Humans born with almost same levels of creativity, but loss some or many of it when get older...because never use it's creativity...we lost in TV, computers, gadgets and video games from childhood...and I think this is why many of us loss their creative power...

    I think we can turn it on again, by practice art and try to boost creative-intelligence area of our brains...I think neurons in that area become useless over-time and just need some practice to wake-up again...

    or peoples who become talented artist by practice from childhood...many of this talented artists loss their mathematical-intelligence, because don't do math seriously...

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  17. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nimadez View Post
    [sorry for my bad grammar]

    Humans born with almost same levels of creativity, but loss some or many of it when get older...because never use it's creativity...we lost in TV, computers, gadgets and video games from childhood...and I think this is why many of us loss their creative power...

    I think we can turn it on again, by practice art and try to boost creative-intelligence area of our brains...I think neurons in that area become useless over-time and just need some practice to wake-up again...

    or peoples who become talented artist by practice from childhood...many of this talented artists loss their mathematical-intelligence, because don't do math seriously...

    Thats so true, recently i realized this: when i was a little child i used my imagination a lot, a huge lot, and i used to draw so much more and have so much more fun with my imagination, but as i grew older i stoped using my imagination, so sad, its all because of school, they kill your imagination. Anyway, i someone posted thin link in another thread, after i readed it i realized what i have just told you, its amazing getting back to your imagination, but you should excersize it to get back on shape http://www.winwenger.com/whiteart.htm

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  18. #16
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    I think we need some day-dreaming, even if peoples call you fantasy or stupid dreamer...common peoples more use their symbolic inner-verbal-chatter to thinking, and they never goes beyond logical and linear mind, I call them Materialism, because can't see any fantasy out of reality and matter...

    and schooools, holy sh*t...we are all brainwashed in this political schools, they want to fit us into society and government laws...

    I call this "Right-brain peoples in the Left-brainy world"

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  19. #17
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    I think nimadez is right. Unlike generations before us, who were relatively untouched in terms of consumption, we are consuming so much that a big part of our time is going into consumption rather than into creativity (seeing them as opposites). So you have to train your creativity as much as you train your technical skills. Even though some people think creatively more than others, it's not something that is only achievable by inheritance.

    Christian has some interesting points as well. Whenever you dive deeper under the surface of a creative field, your imagination tends to shrink contrary to how much your technical knowledge grows. IMO this is due to how much energy goes into the actual learning process. When you train your creativity tho, your ideas will be far superior to what you thought was great before you had the skills. So train both, creativity and knowledge.

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  20. #18
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    Draw what interests you, and don't be afraid to learn about your subject you want to draw, and creativity should start creeping into your art.

    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
    --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear

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  21. #19
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    Well, Dave already kinda said what I was going to say, but I'll post it anyway.

    People often confuse the ability to just draw what they see with nothing but memorization. While that is true in some cases, most of the time it's through study, not visual memorization.

    When it comes to drawing, people seem to think that as long as they can picture it in their mind, but then they cant get that drawing down on paper, then they must have some kind of mental artistic block. Yet when applied to any other situation you can clearly see how absurd this is!

    Imagine I told you to look at a car engine. Stare at the car engine, look at it nonstop for a week. If I then gave you an empty chasse and said "build me an engine" you'd say I was insane. You might be able to get some basic parts correct based on visual memorization, but without studying how the engine works there’s no way you could know how to put all of it together.

    It’s exactly the same with drawing. People don’t just study muscle groups because they cant think of anything more exciting in their drab, boring lives. No they learn it because its necessary to build a drawing!

    If I ask you to build an engine, you are going to get to a point where you ask “How does this valve fit into the engine?”
    If I ask you to build a boat, you are going to get to a point where you ask “How does this pole fit into the deck?
    If I ask you do draw a cow, you are going to get to a point where you ask “How does this leg fit into the torso?”

    Now the reason why you might find that the better the artist the more they are able to just whip up a drawing straight from their mind is because a lot of their previous study has crossover like muscle groups and how skeletons are put together. They begin to get quicker at breaking an animal down into simple shapes and study the animal/person/object at a very quick speed, but this comes with years and years of study.

    So to sum this all up, no there is nothing wrong with you because you cant draw an animal from memory that you just looked at, just as there is nothing wrong with me because I can't build a boat from memory that I just looked at.

    Hope that helps.

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  22. #20
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    I think the biggest creativity comes from just letting it go and not caring too much. When you enter that state of mind that "Everything is possible", that's when interesting things start to appear on paper and you don't even have to put lots effort into that. Of course first there is filling your brain all sorts of images and achieving technical skills but that's just matter of time.

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  23. #21
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    Thanks for all the good replies. I switched my approach and tried drawing a face from a magazine I have. The results were..well..I think a five year old could do better. So I think apparently any talent I used to have has gone. Oh, and in general how can you tell if you have any talent when you start to draw?

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  24. #22
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    Wait? You're trying to become more creative and "draw stuff from mind", right? Why do you draw faces from magazines then? It's a duality, you're training your skills by studying anatomy, perspective, proportions etc, and then you train your creativity by trying to put a thought onto paper. This doesn't have to look neat or super detailled or even right. It has to express what you want to achieve with it.

    And "talent" really isn't a question. You have to work hard anyway, so talent is the last thing you should try to think about now. Some people go as far as to say that talent doesn't exist.

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  25. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiiamreaper View Post
    So I think apparently any talent I used to have has gone. Oh, and in general how can you tell if you have any talent when you start to draw?
    I think placing too much importance on the word "talent" can end up crippling people when it comes to learning to do anything new. Often times I see people give up before they even start just because they feel they don't have this mystical ability (if you can call talent that), when really what it boils down to is that they have to study, be dedicated, and not give up when it comes to learning / relearning a skill. It's hard work. No one just wakes up and suddenly becomes a pro athlete or stellar musician. Don't be a pessimist if a project doesn't go the way you want it to. Rather learn from the things you are doing wrong and work to correct that.

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  26. #24
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    I have a similar problem. There are times when I can literally almost see what's in my head on the paper, but I mess it up when I actually try to draw it.

    I have many good ideas on what I'd like to draw, but usually lack the ability to make them the way I imagine

    But as far as creating new and original ideas, I'm retarded. I've seen some people that can just draw an original looking new creature design straight outta their head, but I can't do anything without directly ripping off anatomy from some sci-fi/horror monster movie

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  27. #25
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    That's because people think drawing from the imagination is copying what they see in their mind. Only thing is their mind changes those details constantly. Think up an image, and then put the rough on paper. From there it's all a creation process and figuring things out. So instead of putting together this picture in your head you actually have to apply your thoughts to the piece of paper. Freeing your mind to work with the design more.

    That is what being creative is all about, and that is why people enjoy it so much. The process of drawing is seeing many ideas come together in one peice on a physical plane (your mind is free space so the only limitation is your memory), as you practice and observe you start to hone your cognitive abilities and understand things better with the tool and techniques you are teaching yourself. Drawing from the imagination is like sculpting a piece of clay.

    The only reason why you have a hard time putting something to paper is because you have limitations which your mind doesn't. You just have the wrong idea of what drawing from imagination really is. So not only do you have to be creative but you also have to figure out at the same time how to put the medium to the paper to bring about the illusion of your idea.

    You put an idea on paper it's there forever. Since you got that first idea down your brain doesnt have to be occupied with thinking about it and it can move on to the next process.

    These two vids are great by the way. Some good advice.

    http://www.beliefdesign.com/work/ind...7.Experimental

    Last edited by Costau D; May 22nd, 2008 at 06:53 PM.
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