Can you see the solution? (before you start drawing)

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Thread: Can you see the solution? (before you start drawing)

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  1. #1
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    Can you see the solution? (before you start drawing)

    When you get an idea, how clear is that image in your mind before you start drawing?

    Are you solving the problems (where everything goes) in you mind or on the paper?

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    I usually have only few guidelines on how it should look like and the rest comes out while drawing. The lines I loosely put on paper give me answers on how to continue and I follow it until everything looks complete. I think those type of images come out the most imaginative and fresh. If it's too weird, I can always make it more grounded or start again.
    I noticed many beginners try to solve everything before they ever pick pencil and it usually leads to dead end or creative block.

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    Even when I think I have a clear image in my head, I'm always surprised when I start drawing.


    Tristan Elwell
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Even when I think I have a clear image in my head, I'm always surprised when I start drawing.
    Ditto, I also almost always end up with something different in the end too. Luckily it is almost always something better to boot.

    My work: [link]
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    A Frazetta quote from the March issue of IFX:
    "I never have a solid image in my head before I start drawing, just a certain feeling about it. On rare occasions I see the images very clearly once I start sketching, but they're usually just very simple scenes. I don't see detail, just a certain atmosphere—that it's warm or cold, that it's terrible or eerie. I see SOMETHING, but nothing distinct. Maybe there's a thrust in some direction to it or a circular action. As I'm thinking my hand will draw almost unconsciously, building shapes and masses with no details—it's often like my mind is one place and my hand is another, like I'm drawing by instinct. And somehow it all starts to come together. Let's say I feel strongly about a certain area: I might suddenly see the space as needing a big figure coming at you. To his left is the suggestion of another figure: I'll either decide to make it higher or lower to create an interesting up-and-down pattern. Then considering the next area I want to work in, I'll create another shape, more up-and-down patterns that achieve a sense of balance. Keep in mind that at this point, they're not really figures, but more like blobs indicating position and importance. Then to keep the piece from seeming too repetitious or fake, I'll force a new element, a figure or shape, to sweep across and through it, cutting into it. It's pure abstract design. Once I've established the composition that I'm happy with, I'll work on the forward figures first: they're the most important. There's no point in building a roof for your 'house' if you haven't built strong 'walls' first. But, above all, there's always an interaction of shapes that provides a feeling of movement, even if the main figure is standing still--I think that's why people react to my art, even if they can't figure out why the hell they're reacting to it. It's not posed and fake: you get the feeling it's got some life to it, that you're a witness to something going on and if you blink it'll be gone."


    Last edited by Elwell; May 16th, 2008 at 11:40 AM.

    Tristan Elwell
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    Even when I think I have a clear image in my head, I'm always surprised when I start drawing.
    Same here... sometimes it's like the drawing has a will of it's own and I'm just along for the ride.

    "Change is a virtue my friend... if you want to escape, all you have to do is make up your mind."
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    I usually do a few thumbnail sketches before I try drawing anything. I have to have a pretty good idea of what I want to draw or I'll just draw crap. It ends up not being that great anyway, but knowing what I wanted helps me see what the problem areas are.

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    I usually start to discover new ways of working whilst i'm painting (if i'm having a good day). It usually just hits me at random whilst i'm trying to get a certain effect. This is why I really dislike to plan out paintings in major detail, because most of the time, I can't see solutions, but when i'm sat in front of a painting just working at it, my thoughts are able to flow more easily and things start to fall into place.

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    I will echo what others have already said. I often have a clear image in my head when starting a project, but the final result seldom bears any resemblance to the original image. Sometimes it is better.

    The truth will set you free,
    but first it's gonna piss you off!

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