I Am An Art Critic - Page 2
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 31 to 52 of 52
  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well as said it depends on how you do it. Mostly I know if people are critiquing me be it on this site, teachers, friends etc. I like to know what they've done. Mainly because there's a big different between "internet artists" and actual artists (it applies to other things as well, internet car tuners etc.). These people are very knowledgeable usually, knowing a lot of techniques and theories in said field. But when it boils down to it they really don't have any practical experience.

    Now once again this doesn't matter if you critique right, there's a big difference between "I see how you're doing this, you can improve your technique by..." from "I see how you're doing this, I would change it and improve the technique by..." It's the implication of actual experience from head knowledge and theories.

    That being said... It's nice to have commercial eyes and non artistic influenced eyes also so people can see how the public perceives their art.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #32
    Dave_'s Avatar
    Dave_ is offline Fighting dwarves with keytars. Level 6 Gladiator: Provocator
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    506
    Thanks
    585
    Thanked 158 Times in 96 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You know how they say, never thrust a skinny chef. or Never get tattoo's from someone without tattoo's (in holland we ectualy have an 'tattoo artist' without tattoo's, and he stinks).

    But then again, where not paying to eat your crits, nor let them get tattoo'ed on our bodies. So you can't do real damage, welcome to ca ^^.

    (23:41:52) (ArneLurk) I woner of there are people who have hairy penises
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    226
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 36 Times in 23 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    its a forum do what you want and see how it gos down.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm an art critic . . . too. ;-D

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    George Town Tasmania Australia
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    It's Been A Year Since My Last Post

    It's Been A Year Since My Last Post....on this thread....so I'll say something about art, some of my ideas, some borrowed, some synthesized, some I hope useful to others here at ConceptArt.org Forums.-Ron Price, Tasmania
    ----------------------------------
    My comments on art were stimulated into existence by watching the following TV program: “This Is Civilisation: Save Our Souls,” Thursday 26 March 2009, 8.30 pm. SBS TV
    ----------------------
    Forty years on from Kenneth Clark's landmark series Civilisation, art critic Matthew Collings offers his own interpretation of Western art history for a modern audience. Collings emphasizes that our time, our years, our generations(Post WW2) are a period in which contemporary art and tastes reflect a lack of belief in anything at all.

    In each episode of this series of TV programs on art, Collings chooses key moments in western history when there was a fundamental shift in attitudes towards, and the objectives of art. Beginning with Greek and Roman classicism glorifying man, through to religious art and art as a saviour of the soul, Collings concludes with the nihilism of modern art.

    Last night I watched the 3rd episode about John Ruskin and then I wrote the following:
    --------------------------------
    There was a strenuous and ceaseless exertion of the intellect in Ruskin’s life. It went on for years, decades, epochs until the last decade of his life when bipolar disorder put an end to the logic and reason of it all. The exercise of reason for Ruskin was largely a pleasurable exercise and it occupied the interstices of his life for the most part quite pleasantly, although that was not always the case. This exercise of the intellect, Collings argues, was partly a compensation for the blindness of the heart, its passionate and seemingly insatiable lifeforce where man often explodes in the service of his passions.

    John Ruskin once wrote, the great writer or poet must combine "two faculties, acuteness of feeling and command of it." I have certainly had my destructive, irrevocable explosions and, like a chronicler, I go back into the past to put it together again. "Desire,", the Iranian philosopher and religious mystic 'Abdu'l-Baha wrote back in 1875, "is a flame that has reduced to ashes uncounted lifetime harvests of the learned." Accumulated knowledge can not quench this flame. Only some inner control, what in Islam is sometimes called an inner-spiritual-mental jihad can control and guide this desire. And waging jihad, mental or otherwise, has never been one of my gifts.

    The government of the passions seems to be a life-long task which one only partly achieves.-John Ruskin,"The Symbolical Grotesque Theories of Allegory, Artist and Imagination," Ruskin's Poetic Argument, Cornell UP, 1985.
    -------------------------------------------------

    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,878
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 630 Times in 400 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Any crit's a good crit and presents it's own value.

    You have avg man on the street crit's, those are important if they include your target group.

    Art student crit's are OK, but remember that thier views are conditioned ones.

    Fresh crit is another issue, having the same person return for more crit are not usefull, you kinda need someone to forget what they originally saw and come in with a fresh look.

    Two skills are usefull, to be able to have multi framed views on something, being able to have fresh and differant views on something, simple face value(Ignoring the technical critical self talk, It's either cool, weird or boring)
    Contextified Technical aspects, construction, rendering, etc
    Contextified Narrative/Successfullness of goal(A stick drawing can succeed)
    Contextified Advanced face value, Rythm, reading, feel, flow, emotion etc..

    And being able to translate what someone is saying, a dude might voice an appeal or a dislike, you need to think carefully what exactly the problem is as they don't always know how to describe it. To blow it off as, What does he/she know is not going to take the truthfull observation away. For instance someone might say, everything seems to soft or blurry. Does not neccecarily mean that you have to sharpen everything, you might have to sharpen selectively and then soften other stuff more to gain that contrast that "You" have in mind.

    Last edited by George Abraham; July 6th, 2009 at 04:42 AM.
    ----------------------------------
    Scetchbook: View the exhibitionist's stuff.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    George Town Tasmania Australia
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thanks zaorr

    Goodness---it's been nearly a year since I've been here. I'm now in the middle years(65-75) of late adulthood, as some human development psychologists call the years from 60 to 80. As long as I'm alive and kicking you folks will find me here occasionally. I have been stimulated by the rich discussion initiated by my posts on this thread and so I wish you all well in your artistic pursuits.....As I say....seeya....lateRon

    Last edited by RonPrice; May 19th, 2010 at 02:26 AM. Reason: to add some words
    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    brisbane, australia
    Posts
    699
    Thanks
    290
    Thanked 651 Times in 210 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yep, these people are an interesting and inspiring bunch. I barely ever draw anymore, but I can't stop loitering around this lounge, it's always full of things to make you laugh or think. Definitely one of my favourite little corners of the internet.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #39
    BlightedArt's Avatar
    BlightedArt is offline That annoying itch you just can't seem to scratch Level 11 Gladiator: Essedarii
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,830
    Thanks
    1,110
    Thanked 1,312 Times in 544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Edit: Forget this post. Didn't realize it was from like 2 years ago. D:

    Last edited by BlightedArt; May 19th, 2010 at 04:56 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    320
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 187 Times in 105 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by BlightedArt View Post
    Edit: Forget this post. Didn't realize it was from like 2 years ago. D:
    Me too, all the time i was thinking it got started while i was sleeping. Well... i guess we will see Ron Price again next year. He's like Santa

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #41
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Slowest. Spamming. Ever.

    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  13. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    1,795
    Thanked 1,555 Times in 607 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Has this guy given critique yet?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #43
    Black Spot's Avatar
    Black Spot is offline Pew, Pew, Pew Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    9,708
    Thanks
    3,232
    Thanked 5,374 Times in 3,595 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotime View Post
    Has this guy given critique yet?
    No, but he has started some tl:dr threads in Art Discussion and always over thinking everything.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    1,795
    Thanked 1,555 Times in 607 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Exactly.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #45
    Arshes Nei's Avatar
    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    What in the world??

    Btw, post here more... http://www.conceptart.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=59

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    George Town Tasmania Australia
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It has been another year since I was on this thread. I've entered many a discussion, posted many an item over the years and, more recently, started a new website at: http://www.ronpriceepoch.com/ Concept art is, as someone put it, a useful little corner of cyberspace.-Ron Price, Tasmania

    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,850
    Thanks
    1,128
    Thanked 1,402 Times in 557 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    WELCOME BACK RON!!! pld:







    Attached Images Attached Images  
    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."
    --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear

    Check out my Sketchbook! Critique and Criticism welcomed.

    or my Deviantart!

    · or check out my: Blog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ArtZealot For This Useful Post:


  20. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,888
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 3,153 Times in 1,067 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    ...and I'm a PC.




    Yep, waited a long time for that one.

    "Astronomy offers an aesthetic indulgence not duplicated in any other field. This is not an academic or hypothetical attraction and should require no apologies, for the beauty to be found in the skies has been universally appreciated for unrecorded centuries."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    George Town Tasmania Australia
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    What A Delight!

    It's been another six months since I was last at this thread. Life is busy both in cyberspace and real space even when one is nearly 70 years old and the evening of life could become night sooner rather than later. One never knows when one's end shall be, as a poet said. Art Zealot's welcoming note was a fine piece of colour and art and much appreciated even if belatedly. "Advance 3 squares and pick a card," as they say Downunder.

    I just watched the film about the Jackson Pollock directed by Ed Harris. I post a prose-poem as a result of that experience below.-Ron
    ------------------------------------
    POLLOCK and ME

    In 2000, Jackson Pollock(1912-1956) was the subject of an Academy Award–winning film Pollock directed by and starring Ed Harris(1950- ). I watched this film last night in Tasmania, more than ten years later during the middle years(65-75) of my late adulthood, the years from 60 to 80 according to one model of human development in the lifespan.(1) I won’t give you chapter and verse of the plot, the characters or, indeed, the life-narrative of Jackson Pollock beginning as the film did in the early 1940s of his life when Pollock was nearly 30, and ending, as the film didm with his death in 1956. By the mid-1950s Pollock was a world-famous artist in the abstract expressionist movement. I’ll let you read the details about his life for yourself, if you are interested.

    My interest in the film is in Pollock’s alleged (BPD)bipolar disorder,(2) and how this disability played itself out in the volatile personality of this artist’s life and, finally, in his death when I was just entering puberty. I have been afflicted with this same BPD which I have dealt with by medications and not alcohol and sex, a fatal combination in Pollock’s case as it is so often in the case of sufferers with BPD. I had the steadying hand of a wife, as Pollock did, and a steadying set of values and beliefs which Pollock did not as he wandered around an intellectual miasma of secular humanism, pop psychology of the Jungian variety, and the vast array of the print and electronic media which was beginning by the 1950s to extend itself into every corner of the brains of human beings in the West, in the artistic avante-garde. Would he have been better off in the 21st century with the modern battery of psychiatry? I leave this question with readers here at ConceptArt.org.-Ron Price with thanks to (1) TDT TV, 9 & 10/12/’11, 11:50-2:25 a.m., and (2) Albert Rothenberg, “Bipolar Illness, Creativity, and Treatment,” The Psychiatric Quarterly, Vo. 72, No.2, pp. 131-147.

    Absolutely driven, Jackson:
    wonderful stuff when you
    are in control, on the even
    keel…and not giving in to
    those demons at the edge.(1)

    I had help from psychiatry
    and you had to do it all by
    yourself…in those archaic
    days before chemotherapy
    and these many new forms
    of talk therapy which came
    into society & my times after
    you died, Jackson. Thank God
    I was a war baby and not one of
    those from what they now call…
    The Greatest Generation.(2)

    (1) Among the many views of Pollock’s work the following from Wikipedia provides a taste. The art critic Clement Greenberg supported Pollock's work on formalistic grounds, that is, he saw Pollock’s work as fitting well into Greenberg’s view of art history as a progressive purification in form and the elimination of historical content. Greenberg therefore saw Pollock's work as the best painting of its day, the 1950s and 1960s. It was, he said, the culmination of the Western tradition going back, via Cubism and Cézanne, to Manet. The critic Robert Coates once derided a number of Pollock’s works as “mere unorganized explosions of random energy, and therefore meaningless.”
    (2) The generation born between 1911 to 1924: see a fascinating table of the names ascribed to different generations going back to 1588.

    Ron Price
    10/12/’11

    Last edited by RonPrice; February 26th, 2012 at 06:46 PM. Reason: to add some words
    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    George Town Tasmania Australia
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    My Annual Email and More

    My annual email is found in the autobiography section of my website at: http://www.ronpriceepoch.com/auto.html
    -------------------
    And here is another little reflection on art.-Ron
    --------------------------
    THANKS TO DONALD FRIEND

    People who want to devote their attention to a significant extent more than an average, a casual, number of hours everyday to an art, a craft, a caring role, a garden, a movement, a cause, a job---whatever---need to have as few distractions as possible. By 2006 I found myself, at last, in what was for me this enviable position in relation to my writing. The world did not call constantly at my door and I did not call constantly at its many doors.

    Full-time, part-time and volunteer work were, at last and for the most part, behind me. I was 62. I found the words and life of Australian artist Donald Friend helpful. When he was 62 he entered the last 20 years of his fertile life.

    Some of my writing is intended to please, to impress, others, to be attractive, indeed, to embrace their souls and invite them into a rich and rewarding universe, a place of profound meaning and intellectual pleasure; and some is done only for myself, for my private exploration, to order and enlarge my own experience. The two aims and intentions are not mutually exclusive and there are other aims in writing as well. The blots and blobs, the lines and little shapes, the incidental and purposive, the accidental and planned, aspects of my writing which are incorporated into the execution of my several compositions draw incessantly on, and give flight to, my imagination and my pleasure. Some works, of course, give me more pleasure than others; some seem more imaginatively created. Some parts seem to control me and I seem to control other parts. And there is the inevitable drudgery, dryness and drift.

    What was once and for at least half a century(1949-1999+) connected to my work as a student, an employee or part of one of the many casual and purposive activities of my writing life has now become an obsession with fewer and fewer distractions.-Ron Price with thanks to Lou Klepac,"The Drawings of Donald Friend," Internet Site, 2006.

    There is little here
    of that clarity of
    vision called humour,
    although I try to see
    my fellows as they are
    and not with some false
    sentiment & preference.

    I am aware of life's incongruities,
    of the complexities of behaviour,
    its pretensions, its idiosyncrasies,
    the prototypes of them in the mass.

    Humour is a rare gift, a delight
    to the whole spectacle of life.
    Sadly I do not seem able to make
    it part of my poetry, my essays,
    my interviews, my journals, or
    my notes--I leave it behind
    in my daily and regular life.

    Ron Price
    16 November 2006
    Updated for: ConceptArt.org
    On: 27/2/'12

    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    843
    Thanks
    94
    Thanked 313 Times in 258 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    WOow that is one long autobiography!
    But I admit from what I read so far of the site, it's very interesting o:

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,350
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 118 Times in 69 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have a love hate relationship with this video:





    I just like this video, somehow it's related.

    My New Neglected Sketchbook
    You Ain't no Nina!.....

    "Too often we... enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John Fitzgerald Kennedy
    "My mind is made up. Don't confuse it with facts." -- Terence McKenna
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •