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Thread: Oil Painting Process: "Book Cover" Covers composition, color, and using reference

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    Oil Painting Process: "Book Cover" Covers composition, color, and using reference

    (This is an edited version of a thread originally posted in the It's Finally Finished forum)

    This is the cover for a YA novel from Random House about a teenage girl who is a war chief in Arthurian (5th century) Britain. Oil over acrylic on illustration board, 12"x16".
    Attachment 361892

    I've been posting here for over a year and a half without showing much work, so I thought I'd make up for it by doing a step by step run through of my process.

    This was actually the sequal to a book I did the cover for a few years ago.
    Attachment 361893
    The art director wanted a similar image, but they requested more color and action this time, and a different weapon. After reading through the manuscript I did a bunch of quick sketches. This is the one they picked.
    Attachment 361894

    I'd talked to the AD about what I was planning in terms of color, but just to be safe I did a color sketch in gouache and sent it to him for final approval before I went ahead.
    Attachment 361895

    Once I got an OK, the next step was getting reference. For figures, I like to have my shots done by a photographer in New York who specializes in reference photography for illustrators. He's got tons of costumes and props, and can get anything he doesn't have on hand. He shot about four rolls of film while I "directed". These are the two shots I ended up working from the most, the left for the head, the right for the arm and body.
    Attachment 361896

    To be continued...
    Next time: I actually get down to painting.
    Last edited by Sepulverture; November 25th, 2009 at 02:18 AM. Reason: Cleanup and re-organizing - Sepulverture

    Tristan Elwell
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  4. #2
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    This is great!
    Finally, someone's using oils instead of digital. (jk, I love digital too.) How long did you have to paint this. It seems as though not many illustrators use oils now adays, cuz it takes too long to dry. Do you always work your illus. with oils?

    When you do your color comps, do you always do them in gouache? Which do you prefer and why, gouache or acrylic? Ive worked with acrylic and I sorta like it, but ive just recently started working with gouache and like it much more, but Ive heard that it's difficult to get saturated colors. Is this true? (sorry for the barrage of questions)

    Can't wait to see the wip!
    Btw, I love the design of your shapes and values.Simple and not too flashy, but effective.

    -iwasink
    -http://iwasink.com/-
    DS Illustration
    "Get reference.
    There is nothing wrong with using a photo to help you see things.
    No one complains about life drawing,
    so take a photo.
    its easy, and will improve your piece greatly."

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    OK, I'm back. I'll answer some of i.w.i's questions, then on to the WIP shots.

    I actually had over a month from the time this was assigned until I turned it in, but the actual painting took five days. Figure in time for reading the manuscript, research, sketches, and the photo shoot, and we're probably talking a week's work total. It's hard to say exactly, though, because I'm usually working on a bunch of projects at one time.

    Drying time isn't really an issue. There are all sorts of tricks you can use to pretty much get oils to dry as fast or slowly as you want. I paint thinly and use Liquin, so the paint dries overnight. Any faster than that and you loose one of the chief advantages of oils, the ability of the wet paint to be blended and manipulated over an extended period of time.

    Most of the time when I do a color rough I'll actually do it in oils too, and it will be even smaller and looser than this one. But it's pretty easy to go back and forth between oil and qouache, they have much more in common with each other than either does with acrylics. The color and value range of guache is more limited, because the pigment particles aren't suspended in a transparent vehicle (it has to do with refractive indices and all sorts of other esoteric stuff).

    Tristan Elwell
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    Day One: Compositing the reference and underpainting

    After the photo shoot I got the film processed at a one-hour photo place. I get 4x5 prints plus a cd of each roll. It's much easier to spread out and compare a bunch of prints, but with the cd I don't have to deal with scanning. The film scans also contain more information than the prints.

    I use Photoshop the same way I used to use a Xerox machine and Scotch tape. I took the head from the first shot and put it on the body from the second, rotating and scaling it so that it fit. I also angled her arm up a bit more. Using Curves, I flattened out the mid tones and brough the highlights out. This did funny things to the color (although if I had remembered to convert to LAB it wouldn't have), but since I wasn't relying on the photo's color anyway I just desaturated it so it wouldn't be distracting. Finally, I extracted the figure from the background. I enlarged my pencil sketch to the size of the painting (12"x16"), dropped the figure from the photos in, and played around with the scaling and placement til it looked right.
    Attachment 361897

    For my painting surface I really like Strathmore illustration board. Unlike most brands it's white paper all the way through, so its absorbs the water from acrylics or gesso more evenly and stays smoother. For strength, I attach it to a piece of 3/8" foam core cut to the same size by binding the edges with white artist's tape. I toned the board a maroonish color with a few thin layers of acrylic, building it up in washes until I was happy with the tone. Then I printed out my combined sketch/reference, traced out the landmarks, and tranferred it to the board with Saral graphite paper. The drawing was tightened up and then I started in with paint. The lights and darks were developed with washes of acrylic, using gesso for white and ivory black with a little purple mixed in. Finally, the whole thing was given a thin coat of matte medium to make sure the board was thoroughly sealed from the oil paint that was to follow.
    Attachment 361898
    Last edited by Elwell; May 4th, 2008 at 10:38 PM.

    Tristan Elwell
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    Day two: starting in with oil

    Now we can finally get to the fun stuff! With the basic value structure and drawing taken care of in the underpainting I can really concentrate on color and paint handling when I go in with oils. I started out with her face, because that was going to be the most important part and would probably require a couple of layers for refinement. Notice how I simplified the values from what was in the reference and brought the shadow from her brows over her eyes. I realized that the combination of the angle of her cape and the drawing of her jawline made it look like her head wasn't attached to her body, so I fixed that. While I had those colors mixed I went on to her arm. I then put in the sky. Normally I would have done that first, but I knew I was crunched for time and I needed to rest my hand on the sky area to paint the face. With some time left in the day I started to get some color on the tunic, bracer, and sword.
    Attachment 361899
    Last edited by Elwell; May 4th, 2008 at 10:39 PM.

    Tristan Elwell
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    Day Three: Background and figure

    I started the day by reworking the sky slightly, then put in the background spears. I went back into her face and hand a little bit, and started developing her hair. Then I began to concentrate on her clothing, working on her cloak, tunic, belt, and bracer (which I made a little bigger). Started work on the horse's hindquarters, the saddle, and her leggings, then called it a day.
    Attachment 361900
    Last edited by Elwell; May 4th, 2008 at 10:39 PM.

    Tristan Elwell
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    Day Four: Almost there...

    More small refinements to the face, background, and hair, then on to the clothing. I decided the color of the tunic wasn't quite right so I glazed it down slightly. Her lower leg is completely repainted, the sword blade is blocked in, then it's on to the horse and saddle. The horse's mane gets a lot of attention, and I realize I have to put her other arm in. The horse needs more structure than I've given it in the underpainting, so I spend my time blocking everything in loosely rather than focusing in on details. Hopefully I can finish off in one more day because it's DUE!
    Oil Painting Process: "Book Cover" Covers composition, color, and using reference

    Tristan Elwell
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    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

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    Day Five: Finishing up

    One more day before it has to get turned in and a near disaster strikes. When I try to paint the sword hilt I decide I hate Hate HATE the design (or lack thereof) and it has to be completely redrawn. This involves quite a bit of color matching to the background to accommodate the changed shape, but in the end it works out. Fortunately everything else goes smoothly. The scabbard is painted, the saddle finished up, and I spend the rest of the day concentrating on the horse, and even get some sleep.
    Oil Painting Process: "Book Cover" Covers composition, color, and using reference

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
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    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
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    Very cool ! This gives inspiration to get back into painting.
    By the way, does the photographer you're dealing with has a website or something ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by egerie
    By the way, does the photographer you're dealing with has a website or something ?
    No, he's a real old-timer, doesn't even have e-mail. Part of why I like working with him is that he's been doing this forever, so he's a real link to history and traditions of the field.

    Tristan Elwell
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    I'm glad you posted this. It's the first of your work where I noticed your name and resolved to seek out other work by you, as I liked it so much. Mostly, however, I'm glad you posted it for the chance to raise what may be a sensitive question, regarding a problem I see with much fantasy illustration, which tends to involve the depiction of a pre-modern, generally medieval milieu. The characters look more like modern people in dress-up than actual people of the period.
    I can't quite frame what there is about these depictions that suggests moderns in dress-up to me, except to say by comparison the figures of Jon Howe and Jon Rush look "period" where most other fantasy illustrator's figures don't, yours included.
    But is it even a problem?
    This work is a cover for a book about a teen-age girl in Arthur's day. The target audience, presumably modern teen-age girls, will relate to an image reflecting their experience, that's just good-sense marketing. This all assumes the anachronism is intentional, rather than an accidental by-product of using photo-reference, of painting in fact "a modern person in dress-up".
    After all this, I guess that's the question, is the anachronism intentional or accidental?

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    wow man, nice work! So refined and yet you work so small(imo). The sequel cover is my prefered but both are blatantly excellent.

    Random story(I hope it was you they were reffering to) : Went down to the local art store(I'm in New Zealand) to get some canvas and got chatting to the couple who had recently bought the place. Saw that he was busy working away on an illustration(very slick pencil piece) and so scooted on over to check it out. So we get talking for ages about illustration and turns out this guy knows his shit inside out and has STACKS(as in more than 2000 he tells me) of books on illustrators from past and present which gives me the preverbial hardon. Turns out his name is Jim Auckland(appropriate considering he's just moved to the city of Auckland) and was one of your old art teachers... atleast I think so!. Bizzare coincidence if I do say so myself. Been back a couple of times since and milled over some of his books and generally geeked out on the fact I've met (bar Rusty) someone who is into this stuff as much as I am.


    ..again, stunning work!

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    hi! Good work man, i especially like the fact you're using oils, I love traditionnal rendering! the suggestion of the background is well done, the red and the weapons gives us just what the mind needs to imagine all the warriors behind!
    I'm french, and I would like to know if american editors are giving you a lot of time to do your cover, because oil is so long to dry! And also Know how much is payed a cover , to compare with french editors... bye!

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