Colour problems
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    Colour problems

    Hello, I'm kind of hoping for tips on colouring this drawing. It's for someone else, so I was trying to make it look better than normal, and I just don't quite know where to start.

    I keep getting the feeling that there should be more darks in the colouring, but I'm having trouble inserting them without losing the airy, light feel I was going for, and I was hoping someone could give me pointers on putting texture into cloth and fur.

    General crit is also really appreciated. I have a naggy feeling about the perspective, and unfortunately it seems a bit late to be corrected, which irks me.

    Thank you!

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    The water seems to be reflecting the sky, , but if that is the case what is the chandelier hanging from... It seems like there is no ceiling.

    Another thing that bugs me about the piece is that the only things with a drawn border are the characters. Everything else in the scene is lacking the black outline. I recommend picking either one or the other and sticking with that.

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    You've given yourself a rough start. You definitely need some more darks in this image (though not too many, since like you said the light airy feeling is what's driving this)

    Really, you should have started with some darker colors and moved towards lighter ones. Also, I'm not seeing any kind of consistent light source in this.

    And I agree with bai fan - what is the pool reflecting really? You could use it as an interesting storytelling element - maybe it's reflecting the columns over on the other side of the room - and there's a MAN there looking in! or something...

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    I haven't painted in the pool yet (I started with a narrower image and decided that it should be widened), but I was thinking of a small fountain of some sort that would reflect the chandelier. Since it's a sunny day outside, that would probably be where the light source was coming from.. I've just been really hesitant to add in darks because I'm not sure where to put them.

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    My only suggestion is to take a look a sunset magazines they always have this warmth and inviting lighting in the photos of houses. That sort of reference might help. If you titled the floor or place a rug, I think that would be awesome

    Make a sketchbook happy, feed it a tip to improve!

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    Something I would recomment is making the cat darker, only using a little bit of darks, especially if the chandelier should have dynamic lighting. What is the light source? The sun? The chandelier? If either is so, you should add some warm light colors to the highlighting areas. And use cool colors for the shadows, that's a hard one to do because both black a brown are on the warmer side, so it's difficult to get a cat with brown fur to have good cool shading.

    And the comment about the shading of the cat, when i first looked at the picture, I didn't notice the chandelier and thought it was a giant cat, you need more detail and some contrast in images closer to the foreground. Less contrast and more "washed out" the further away it is.

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    great piece and perspective. need to see more!!

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    it seems to me that you have darks in the background (that's pretty good and dark for plain light and a sunny day.). Now, using that light source model the figure and everything else using the same light source. Therefore, with the light coming from outside, i'm thinking the darkest part of your figure is going to be... well, where you already have the darkest parts of your figure, they're just not dark enough to have the smallest smidgeon (I love the word "smidgeon," and spellcheck even says it's right) of contrast. I would suggest, as before mentioned that you either get more consistent with your line art, or you just paint over it when you're happy and set enough with your colors. I think you've shown you have the ability to do both methods... just you've shown them in the same image...

    Lake already said it, but maybe elaboration could stress this more, it's much easier and more realistic to paint light UP from your darks. Don't start to light, as highlights and really light areas are going to encompass much less of your painting than actual middle tones and darks, and are generally easier to place than to paint around. A lot of painting teachers suggest blocking in your middle tones... some say block in your darks... I don't think I've ever been told to start with my lightest area.

    After all that, you've got some reflected light to ponder... in the pool and such. I would almost suggest the chandelier be unlit... You're going to have way too much light to deal with that your darks might actually be way to light to leave any elements with any contrast.. Right now, if the chandelier is light, you've got two direct light sources and a reflected source. That's a lot of light.

    and.... i'm not sure, but from what i'm seeing her legs might be too short still, even from that angle. Maybe extend the dress a little and see how that looks?

    Keep working and have fun!

    Last edited by Quigleyer; April 13th, 2008 at 02:14 PM.
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