Could I get into Sheridan, or should...
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  1. #1
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    Could I get into Sheridan, or should...

    Hello there, I've got a few questions, mainly about which college might be better for me to go to for computer animation. I've been accepted into Seridan's Visual and Creative Arts course, where I'll get a visual arts diploma, and then hopefully get accepted into their computer animation course. But since Sheridan is one of the best out there, would it be hard to get into computer animation?

    My other choice is the animation course at Loyalist College. Does anyone know how good this course is or have taken it? From where I'm looking at, I'll be learning animation right away, amongst other things, later specifically focusing on what I want. I also hear they have internships, which are pretty good. Plus, it'll be cheaper than Sheridan and I won't have to worry about being accepted into another course to finish.

    So what do you think would be my better choice?

    Last edited by Liliwen; March 18th, 2008 at 09:46 AM.
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    If you wouldn't mind posting some of your observational drawings here, I would be glad to give you my opinion on your chances of getting into Sheridan.

    If you're uncomfortable posting them on this thread, you can mail them to me and I'll be glad to look at them.

    My mail:

    gerard@portfolioworkshop.com


    Gerard Sternik / Director
    Animation Portfolio Workshop


    Visit:

    http://www.portfolioworkshop.com/

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    Okay, thanks! Here's the first one, done in charcoal...


    And the second one, well, I spent more time on this one. Lots more time. Done in acrylic paint.


    A lot of people must try to get into Sheidan's computer animation course, right? And thanks again.

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    O.K....thanks.

    Now, do you have any observational drawings that are made directly from life, like life drawings, drawings of your hands, of objects, rooms, etc.

    No drawings from photos.... just directly from observation?

    Gerard

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    I've posted some examples of colour work from a student of our's who is a applying to the Sheridan and Seneca college computer animation programs.

    The kind of observational drawings that I was asking you for would be examples like the ones I've posted here of objects, figures etc.

    I'd be glad to take a look at yours if you have any, and if you don't, we can discuss the finer points of what you have posted here already.

    Thanks

    Gerard Sternik / Director
    Animation Portfolio Workshop

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    Last edited by Gerard Sternik; March 26th, 2008 at 11:46 PM.
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    First of all, to have a decent career as an animator you need classical training before computer training, you need a strong background in life drawing that stresses movement, you need in fact the broad, general animation background that Disney and Warner Bros. always stressed. I just spoke with a 3D animation director who was bemoaning the general level of animators he has working for him - mainly because most schools no longer stress drawing and classical animation.

    Where you go to school and what diploma or degree you hold is not what gets you the job(s). Animation is one field where your professionalism, ability to be a team player, and skill base (demonstrated by portfolio and demo reel) get you the jobs. Look for a school that stresses classical drawing and animation skills before teaching computer programs!

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    I completely agree with Maxine. I know a lot of 3D artists who lack the basic fundamentals. I am certainly not saying that they are bad but imagine how great you can be if you learned how to walk before you ran.

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    I think it's fair to say that the computer has done great things for animation.
    The technology really has opened up a whole new world of limitless possibilities that really were not possible before the advent of the 3-D stuff.

    However, I have to agree with Maxine.......

    The one major error in philosophy that we run into time and time again with students, is thinking that the computer will make them great animators....(which in short means essentially that the person is not confident with their skill level in observational drawing methods, or isn't aware of the importance of acquiring these skills).

    As Maxine has rightly put it, a deep understanding of gesture through drawing practice, is the key to creating sequential movements of form that are convincing.
    Then one has to be able to express that gesture or sequence of gestures through clearly visualized and constructed volumetric structures.

    When you sit down at the computer to animate with skills like these already under your belt, you are bringing knowledge to the tool as opposed to counting on the tool to make up for limitations in knowledge.

    Gerard Sternik / Director
    Animation Portfolio Workshop

    Visit:

    http://www.portfolioworkshop.com/

    Last edited by Gerard Sternik; March 27th, 2008 at 12:10 PM.
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    I've gotten sudenly busy this week, so I was unable to come here again until now. I'll try to post some observational drawings either later today or tomorrow. I see what you're saying when you say you need to have a strong background in life drawing. That's something I really hope to improve on at school.

    EDIT: Okay, I've done two pictures of my hand. How are these?





    Last edited by Liliwen; March 27th, 2008 at 07:53 PM.
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    I am a fundi student going into animation next year. and I know that they love gestural drawings, from life models. They like seeing the process behind the thick heavy line work. Personally they care about the way you think within your drawings instead of adding lines without care or thought. therefore you can have a fully rendered drawing and it could seem pointless to the portfolio markers because you arnt trying to show them what you can do in an 8 hour drawing, but what you can accomplish in a studio environment.


    I would recommend goign to life drawing classes. etc.


    ( on a side note the more organized your portfolio is the greater the clearity)


    take care buddy, hope it all works out for you. ;P

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    You seem to have a natural inclination for concept art. Do you want to animate or do you want to be a concept artist?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ABO-MATABO View Post
    I am a fundi student going into animation next year. and I know that they love gestural drawings, from life models. They like seeing the process behind the thick heavy line work. Personally they care about the way you think within your drawings instead of adding lines without care or thought. therefore you can have a fully rendered drawing and it could seem pointless to the portfolio markers because you arnt trying to show them what you can do in an 8 hour drawing, but what you can accomplish in a studio environment.

    I would recommend goign to life drawing classes. etc.
    That will be definitely be on my todo list when I go to college.

    take care buddy, hope it all works out for you. ;P
    Thanks, me too. ^^

    You seem to have a natural inclination for concept art. Do you want to animate or do you want to be a concept artist?
    I'm wanting to do something in computer animation, and I've never thought about being a concept artist until you mentioned it. Now I've got something to think about; it sure sounds like something I would like doing.

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    Concept artists do the design work (environment, character and props as well as key color work) for animated films, commercials, and even for some live action films. Concept artists are crucial! For many video games the emphasis is on greater realism than for animated films or 2D games, but they all need and use concept artists.

    Your work shows a natural inclination towards rendering and painting, and I see very little interest in movement. That's why I thought concept art might be the field for you.

    If you live in the GT area, drop in to see the first year show at Max the Mutt.
    It begins with our open house next week end, but will stay up for several weeks.

    Is this recruiting? I think of it as simply letting people know what's available, suggesting that they take a look - not just at Max the Mutt but at all the programs that seem to offer what they're interested in, and then decide which schools seem to be a good fit, and apply to them.

    We need students who want to be at Max the Mutt and have confidence in what they are learning, so we never ever 'hard sell." We just try to give the information and let the students and their families make a decision. Part of our acceptance is based on motivation and enthusiasm. I have actually suggested to a student that he do more work and try again for another school which his mind was set on.

    However, it seems to me that letting people know what's available simply empowers them and helps them to make informed choices.

    I hope this information is deemed appropriate and helpful.

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