Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 62

Thread: Knowledge and Imagination

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,743
    Thanks
    737
    Thanked 470 Times in 316 Posts

    Knowledge and Imagination

    Something I've noticed is that knowledge destroys imagination. The more you know, the less there is to question. The more you know about something, less you can play with it, and the experience of that moment and activity in combination with the object you're playing with diminishes. You know the feeling, surely? Maybe when you first found this site, there was a feeling. Or when you started playing a game of some sort?


    [edit]: If you're new to this thread, it's been discussed and opinions have changed. Please read to the latest comment before posting.
    Last edited by Max Challie; September 18th, 2008 at 11:02 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,082
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,197 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Knowledge destroys the mystery of those things that can be "solved". But there are many many many things that will remain unknowable forever.

    These are the universal themes of art. Love, death, life, the future, the past, adventure, conflict, emotions, the supernatural, etc.

    kev
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,743
    Thanks
    737
    Thanked 470 Times in 316 Posts
    Yeah. It kind of tells us that life is full of puzzles. Have fun with them!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,022 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Max A K Challie View Post
    The more you know, the less there is to question.
    If you truly believe this, then you don't know anything.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,035
    Thanks
    2,167
    Thanked 3,347 Times in 1,123 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Max A K Challie View Post
    The more you know about something, less you can play with it
    I would argue the exact opposite.

    EDIT: shit, Elwell beat me to it.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 757 Times in 489 Posts
    As the others have said, this idea of yours is total rubbish.
    Sketchbook

    "Beliefs are rules for action"
    "Knowledge is proven in action."
    "It's use is it's meaning."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    505
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 109 Times in 71 Posts
    I was much less creative when I knew nothing.


    Fear kills imagination.
    SSG 37
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,743
    Thanks
    737
    Thanked 470 Times in 316 Posts
    Now that I think about it, yes. I find them both to be the case.

    But anyway, thanks for putting your rejection of an idea across in such a rude manner.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    You see rude, we see honest.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,022 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Max A K Challie View Post
    Now that I think about it, yes. I find them both to be the case.
    Ultimate cop-out.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 25 Times in 23 Posts
    at least follow it through lol. Argue your point even if you think your wrong you must have some reason for feeling this way.

    My opinion

    I do understand what you are trying to get at but your not really hitting the nail you could say. When your are learning about art one thing you should keep in mind is that you are just looking at other peoples points of views, how people reach the goal they want to reach in there work. if you are talking about making things look real and learning about things like perspective etc. You should use this knowledge you have acquired as guidelines not as rules. Its great to find out "rules" like ones in perspective and see how far you can bend them. An opportunity to be creative which you wouldnt have if you didnt know the rules? Art is not about right and wrong its about what you feel is right.

    Peace keep at it
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Stephen Mason For This Useful Post:


  16. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,743
    Thanks
    737
    Thanked 470 Times in 316 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Flake View Post
    You see rude, we see honest.
    I'm not sure. Are the responses always relevant to the subject, or do some people simply not like me because I don't post art?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Ultimate cop-out.
    When I get replies like that of armando's, it's not very encouraging to stick with the topic.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Mason View Post
    at least follow it through lol. Argue your point even if you think your wrong you must have some reason for feeling this way.

    My opinion

    I do understand what you are trying to get at but your not really hitting the nail you could say. When your are learning about art one thing you should keep in mind is that you are just looking at other peoples points of views, how people reach the goal they want to reach in there work. if you are talking about making things look real and learning about things like perspective etc. You should use this knowledge you have acquired as guidelines not as rules. Its great to find out "rules" like ones in perspective and see how far you can bend them. An opportunity to be creative which you wouldnt have if you didnt know the rules? Art is not about right and wrong its about what you feel is right.

    Peace keep at it
    EDIT: Thank you! Haha, I was composing the following paragraph, and posted it, only to see this. I just get turned off by replies that are rude on the surface, from my point of view, even though they may be helpful. Some people will simply reject an idea out of it not fitting them; a teenage stereotype might reject the idea of doing art at home instead of going out to drink alchohol, because it doesn't fit into their mindset. I should continue things through to a certain point, and if it is still rejected, then drop it. But stick with it.


    Perhaps I just need to explain further. I can see that my first post was too quick and didn't leave a balance.

    I thought about this after exploring some of the water in Shadow of the Colossus. It's done in a way that gives the impression it's endless, with deep water noises and blackness. This fascinates me, so I explore it more often and wonder how deep it is.

    I started looking at the edges of the rock/ground, how they submerge into the water, looking at them as they descend to see how deep it is. I noticed that with a couple of bodies of water, the edges stop descending diagonally at some point, so that is probably the bottom. Now that I know this, I can't think about them as playfully as I did.

    On the other hand, without any knowledge what-so-ever, it's not possible to question either, is it? And sometimes, a new piece of knowledge is riddled with all its own puzzles that open so many more doors.
    Last edited by Max Challie; February 10th, 2008 at 10:59 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Between the salt water and the sea strand
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
    I can remember one art class in particular where the teacher was practically tearing her hair out, because she had an otherwise talented student who scoffed at the idea of learning any art history at all. "I don't need it! MY style is absolutely original!" To which the teacher, grinding her teeth, responded, "But how will you know that? If you have no idea what your influences are -- and unless you've grown up in a sterile 10x10 room with no entertainment your whole life you DO have influences -- how will you change them? Defy them? Make them your own?"

    In point of fact, this girl's "style" was a combination of manga and Art Nouveau (mostly Mucha) and there was nothing original about it at all -- but she did not understand or seemingly want to understand that. Her ignorance certainly did not make her more imaginative or inspired than her fellows -- it handicapped her in the worst way.

    And don't even get me started on the number of beginning art students who have tried to argue to me that they didn't NEED to know anatomy because their "style" calls for a particular kind of distortion -- even though it was clearly evident from their work that they would have benefited greatly from the knowledge of what the rules of anatomy were before they made their caricatures.

    The more I know, the more I know I need to learn. The more I know, the more vistas open up to me, the more I see that beyond that horizon is another, more tantalizing distance beckoning. What I know now is that I will never know enough, and where in my youth that was frustration, now it the most exciting kind of wonder.
    It is pitch black. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

    My Portfolio
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Swan For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. tree of knowledge
    By tja88 in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 14th, 2009, 07:36 AM
  2. Art: Lords of Knowledge
    By thePoet in forum FINISHED ART & ARTWORK
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 16th, 2007, 11:27 PM
  3. Art: A journey of knowledge
    By WODZGN in forum FINISHED ART & ARTWORK
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 19th, 2007, 01:34 PM
  4. SketchBook: I.R. hungry for knowledge
    By aaashur in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: December 21st, 2006, 06:09 AM
  5. newb needs knowledge
    By Mind_Vacancy in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 31st, 2004, 01:26 AM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook