Presentation of Images in Portfolio?
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    Arrow Presentation of Images in Portfolio?

    Hey, I was just preparing my portfolio for SCAD. I plan to send it on a CD as a PDF (or PowerPoint, haven't dcided yet). The only thing I'm stuck on is the way to present it. SCAD's given insutrctions on the size and the resolution, but that's not what I'm on about. Here's waht I mean:



    I laid most of my works on a table and stood on top of it to take the pictures. You can clearly see the point of perspective as well as the table surface.



    Here, I just gave a neutral color to frame the image by removing the table surface and making that act as a border of some sort (did it in Photoshop). But the perspective is still kind of skewed.



    And here, I just cropped out the borders, but to do that I had to center the crop marks on the drawing, so the sense of space is lost. That really is the only disadvantage of submitting it this way, I'd say.

    Would it be better to hang these on the wall with tacks and then just have the image or submit them with borders? Or are these fair enough to not be hung on the wall. Thanks for any feedback!

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    Ah, oversize art. If you accept photos of your art that show it at an angle, the person looking at it will think that your drawings were off (especially if you crop the borders).

    Take your photos with the art on an easel (got some at your current school that you can use?). Make sure the light is even and represents your colors well (I like taking them outdoors, but I'm not a genius at photography...).

    Oh, on the CD issue? I'd do PDF b/c then the viewer can control how fast the images move (unless you were going to do a PwrPoint with buttons). Personally, I did an on-CD website.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mirana View Post
    Ah, oversize art. If you accept photos of your art that show it at an angle, the person looking at it will think that your drawings were off (especially if you crop the borders).

    Take your photos with the art on an easel (got some at your current school that you can use?). Make sure the light is even and represents your colors well (I like taking them outdoors, but I'm not a genius at photography...).

    Oh, on the CD issue? I'd do PDF b/c then the viewer can control how fast the images move (unless you were going to do a PwrPoint with buttons). Personally, I did an on-CD website.
    Thanks, Mirana. But won't setting the artwork on an easel make it tilt back a little? Atleast, the easels in the art department are tilted back a little and aren't perfectly vertical. Also, would you then support the just image with no borders (the 3rd example at the very bottom)? Sorry if I read you wrong.

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    Ah, I thought the incline on an easel would be less severe then what you've currently got. If there is an incline at all you should show the borders so the viewer knows there is a slight distortion.

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    Pin or nail your artwork to a flat wall with a neutral background (a simple bedsheet will suffice). Light from both sides with nice halogens at 45?, stand back & photograph your stuff with a nice camera on a tripod.

    Take these images into Photoshop, crop off the nails/ pins, color correct if you have to and voila, you've got a crisp image ready to roll.

    Gather all of these images into Acrobat, make a PDF and you should be good to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Storyboard Dave View Post
    Pin or nail your artwork to a flat wall with a neutral background (a simple bedsheet will suffice). Light from both sides with nice halogens at 45?, stand back & photograph your stuff with a nice camera on a tripod.

    Take these images into Photoshop, crop off the nails/ pins, color correct if you have to and voila, you've got a crisp image ready to roll.

    Gather all of these images into Acrobat, make a PDF and you should be good to go.
    this is how i did mine.. it worked out real well.
    just make sure to light it from both sides to reduce the glare.
    i was lucky enough that i have a professional photographer as a friend to help me out.

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    I have to agree with Storyboard Dave.
    All of our students get the best results by pinning their work flat against a wall, making sure that the lens of the camera is parallel to the image.
    Set up two lights on either side of the camera at a 45 degree angle to an imaginary line that runs from your camera lens to the centre of the image.
    I know this will sound funny, but make sure you shoot on a tripod so your pictures are in focus.
    You wouldn't believe the number of students we've had to send back to the "drawing board" to re-shoot their artwork , because it's hard to see as it's somewhat out of focus.
    Also, as Dave says...halogen lights or stronger...you want lots of light so the image is easy to read for the camera.
    As to what colour surface to pin your art to...make it neutral grey or black...no sheen.
    The reason for this is so that the camera picks up the light bouncing off the image and takes it's reading from that, not from the wall surface itself.
    We always tell our students this..remember that the person seeing the image of whatever great drawing or painting your sending them is seeing only that -the IMAGE of it , not the real artwork.
    So in effect, you could create work that's up there with Michaelangelo's in terms of it's quality, but if the photographic documentation of it doesn't equally match, it will be hard to really tell just how good that original drawing or painting is.
    Also...if you can't hack it in the photography dept., find someone else who can, to help you get some good shots.
    It saves plenty of time and frustration!

    Hope that helps.

    Gerard Sternik

    http://www.portfolioworkshop.com/

    Last edited by Gerard Sternik; February 12th, 2008 at 09:50 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsoffar View Post
    i was lucky enough that i have a professional photographer as a friend to help me out.
    It never hurts to make friends with people in other disciplines!

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