Question About Blending in Photoshop

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  1. #1
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    Question About Blending in Photoshop

    Please help me with this. I am a little lost when it comes to using a hard brush to paint with. Can anybody help me understand the benefits of a hard brush when painting in photoshop?

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  3. #2
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    Different techniques are appropriate for different circumstances. Do you plan on painting mostly smooth spheres?


    Tristan Elwell
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  5. #3
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    I totally understand your question. That is when I use a brush with a texture. But it is never a brush with a hard edge.
    Honestly, I am not able to see a time when a flat brush lends itself to rendering any type of form.
    Especially the awesome portraits that people have posted in that thread. I mean just where
    does the blend part come into the equation when you are dealing in flat shapes? Serious and honest question.
    I want to learn.

    Last edited by grantrl78; February 1st, 2008 at 03:27 PM.
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    A hard brush makes more distinct strokes, which means more defined planes/ stronger form. To get smooth blends, one has to continually resample the colors that result from overpainting at reduced opacity.


    Tristan Elwell
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  8. #5
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    to my understanding, you use a combination of hard to soft to get the results you want. Generally starting off with solid blocks of tone and colour done with hard, then using softer brushes if needed to blend.

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  10. #6
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    Okay. So I understand the idea of blocking in color with a hard brush because it lays down color in a smooth controllable way. I guess I was doing it wrong when trying to paint an entire piece with it. Tristan, I love your personalized smiley. That rules.

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