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  1. #1
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    Is Tablet drawing not recommended for beginners/amateurs?

    Is Tablet drawing not recommended for beginners/amateurs like the Pedal is almost forbidden from use by people JUST learning the piano?

    Not sure where to classify myself in terms of skill so I'll do the next best thing: Schooling. I had Intro to Drawing.

    I've had this Wacom for 4-5ish years, but as a relative beginner in the arts, is it a good discipline to stick with the traditional media first until I learn the basics? I am looking for valid reasons of why or why not, or maybe "My teacher said that..." type answers.

    Much appreciated.

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  3. #2
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    A tablet is just another medium, really. IMO, there's something to be said for getting a good handle on traditional media before moving into digital, if only because traditional is less forgiving and forces you to think your marks through more carefully, but apart from that, I've never heard anything about tablets being "restricted" from beginners.

    I think the only real rule to art is something like 'Don't worry, just do it.'

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  4. #3
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    I do recommend beginning artists not to use a tablet, because it's not the same as drawing with a pencil/pen on paper where you will have better control with it anway, due to writing or scribbeling experience from before. A tablet is a new experience of drawing then, so you will get used to that as well, while as a beginner you have to learn still a lot with how to handle your pencil/pen. If you control that, a tablet would be the next step. Just like Atlantis said actually. Also, the tablet and resolution size also matters with this.

    If you want to colour digitally only, it's very recommended since there are no alternatives except for a mouse, which can be painful and not as quick.

    This is just my opinion and experience, I hope I made my self clear to you.

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atlantis View Post
    A tablet is just another medium, really. IMO, there's something to be said for getting a good handle on traditional media before moving into digital, if only because traditional is less forgiving and forces you to think your marks through more carefully, but apart from that, I've never heard anything about tablets being "restricted" from beginners.

    I think the only real rule to art is something like 'Don't worry, just do it.'
    It really is the fact that on whatever-computer-graphics-program, I have the ungodly luxury of Ctrl-Z that traditional artists would only dream about. And after watching stroke-by-stroke animations of my art, a LOT of those strokes are lost in the land of UNDO. I'm just more worried if I'm going to miss out on an important lesson or discipline by continuing.

    Last edited by aquarake; January 18th, 2008 at 03:57 PM.
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  6. #5
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    in my opinion the tablet is the only viable way to paint digitally. the mouse offers nothing in terms of dexterity or nuance of mark that can be made. so you would not learn anything from sticking to using a mouse other than what a pain in the ass it is.

    that said, as i think has been mentioned earlier, the pen / tablet computer is just another interface between you and your work, like a brush, pencil or... finger it is something you need to learn to negotiate and master but there still applies the need for artistic understanding to create good work.

    I think what i'm saying is whichever medium you use the overall endeavour is the same.

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  7. #6
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    I've only recently taken up the tablet after a lifetime of traditional drawing. My first thought was that it would be *great* for newbies! How many times have I done a drawing that was overall pretty good, but this needed to be moved a hair to the left, and that needed to be a touch smaller. How wonderful it is to be able to draw a lasso around things and yank them into their rightful places.

    But cruising this forum and seeing a lot of newbie tablet art...there's a terrible soft squishy "balloon animal" sort of look that a lot of new draftsmen seem to pull out of the tablet. Not to mention retina-burning color.

    So, where it's good it's really very good. And where it's bad, it's slippery and creepy.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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  9. #7
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    I see both sides. I do think there is no learning like learning to draw with traditional materials - but at the same time I think computer learning can also be very useful. Drawing with a tablet can be like training wheels on a bike - it is confidence building because there is the Ctrl-z safety net. But that can be an hindrance too. Personally, i taught myself color theory from using photoshop's color tools, so i can't bash computer learning. Do what works for you - but don't ONLY work with a tablet.

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  10. #8
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    No it's not. It's dangerous to play around with a tablet. You might get the artistic aids and die before your 20th birthday...



    Really. Stop worrying and play around with whatever mediium you like, whether it be lensflares or tablets. You're supposed to enjoy what you're doing, not bother wether you can make money from it or not.

    There's alot of artistic fields. You don't have to be the best classic painter in the world to make money on art.


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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoat View Post
    I've only recently taken up the tablet after a lifetime of traditional drawing. My first thought was that it would be *great* for newbies! How many times have I done a drawing that was overall pretty good, but this needed to be moved a hair to the left, and that needed to be a touch smaller. How wonderful it is to be able to draw a lasso around things and yank them into their rightful places.

    But cruising this forum and seeing a lot of newbie tablet art...there's a terrible soft squishy "balloon animal" sort of look that a lot of new draftsmen seem to pull out of the tablet. Not to mention retina-burning color.

    So, where it's good it's really very good. And where it's bad, it's slippery and creepy.
    I may well start a thread on this interesting observation Stoat - where people can thrash out their views on the fundamental difference between digital and 'real' media.
    Just a quick observation from me for the moment:
    The digital experience is sorta like televised painting - you have the experience that what you see on screen is a representation of something a part of you is doing in another room with real paint.
    Rarely do we work in a way that deals with what is on screen AT FACE VALUE - a glowing surface a couple of microns thick.

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  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    The digital experience is sorta like televised painting - you have the experience that what you see on screen is a representation of something a part of you is doing in another room with real paint. Rarely do we work in a way that deals with what is on screen AT FACE VALUE - a glowing surface a couple of microns thick.
    I dont feel that way at all, although I can definitely understand if someone does, but to me when I am painting digitally I feel like I am in 100% control, and I feel at one with my painting, but If I work traditionaly it gets tedious, random and un important for some reason.
    Also, It might just be that you have to get used to controlling the wacom, I dont even notice it when I am painting, its all just almost flowing from my head on to the screen, where as real tools just get in the way

    I dont hate traditional media as much as it sounds like in this post though

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  14. #11
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    I suspect the disconnect comes from the fact that, unless you have a tablet PC or a Cintiq, you draw in one place and your lines appear in another. If that's been part of your drawing experience all along, it might not seem so weird, but I remember finding it VERY disconcerting when I first started digital graphics. It was like using a pantograph. (Yes, I've used a pantograph. I think I've used every tracing technique known to man).

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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  15. #12
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    archipelago and Stoat: I think you guys slightly misunderstand me: I have absolutely no problem with the wacom tablet at all. I took to it like a duck to water but for a while I found I was imagining it as real paint somehow on telly. When I figured out it was an essentially layering experience with it's roots in collage I was able to produce much more powerful images:
    I include something I've just knocked up this morning:

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  16. #13
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    That's odd, why is my picture appearing as a link? I've done exactly what I usually do, but it doesn't appear as a picture on the screen - only an attachment.....Anyone got any ideas?

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