Sketchbook: [[2-4-13]] The Pariano's sketchbook: Journey to be a (pokemon/art) master! - Page 2

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  1. #31
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    Hey, thanks for checkin out my SB. What pens or pencils are you using one the last few posts? I hope to venture into colors sometime but I do not believe I am ready. Hell I haven't gotten portions down yet. Well, peace out.

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  4. #32
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    SinusAnimus: Pens: Nexus, Pencil: just a regular mechanical pencil.
    Stuff from today:




    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  5. #33
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    Ok Im finally here to crit your sb (no Homo) LOL
    ok first off as always your anatomy studies are bad ass. but I'd like to see you do sum still life drawings, or maybe do some landscapes, also I think that you shud put thoes left hand sketches up because I think that those are a little stronger than your usual drawings. Keep up the consistancy of your drawing. I can only dream of having a work ethic as strong as yours. Oh and the skull chest guy was geinus. keep up the good work and my sb will be up soon. (NO HOMO) LOL.

    Artist hidden in the shadows
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  6. #34
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    Your work is pretty amazing, and you have a great understanding with light and shadow. I wish you could focus more on different body types to understand the rest of what the human form has to offer.

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  8. #35
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    some great looking stuff you got here those anatomy studies rocks



    Sketchbook :: Blog

    Trying is the first step towards failure.

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  10. #36
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    Mikeeee: I miss you man. Get your sb up so I can crit it! haha.
    Murder Tramp: Thank you very much :] this is something I definitely have to get over, I just don't feel confident enough with the basics to start branching out.
    Lee W: Thanks man! :]

    It's been a while, and I've been painting ALOT.












    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  11. #37
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    Just a quick digi paint


    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  12. #38
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    Hey guys, I plan on this painting being one that I will eventually choose from my body of work to put into an 8 piece portfolio for scholastics. I definitely need some other eyes and feedback to make it better and I hope you can help.


    All critique is GREATLY appreciated! Thanks for looking :]

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  13. #39
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    Here's an update on the painting:


    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  14. #40
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    I have some stuff. this is my third day doing " a painting a day"


    The first is how it looked before I basically wiped almost everything down. I like the abstracted edges I got with this.




    bananas .

    This painting was fun, on a 2x2 inch canvas. I hope you can tell what it is, it's two heart shaped links to a chain.



    oh and this is 5x7, I did it by mounting a copy of a drawing from my moleskine on a panel and painting over it with oils


    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  15. #41
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    Here's a little tutorial/ process thing I made to show at another forum:

    So I don't really see any other artists here that ever paint in oils, and it makes me sad. I made this little tutorial/ process thing to show you how I go about it and hopefully get someone to pick up oils!

    First of all here's the still life set up to be painted: just a dusty ceramic twisty vase and a red cloth.


    I painted this with only 3 brushes, the Filbert is my favorite, so versatile:
    From left to right:
    Winsor and Newton size 8 extra long Filbert- Monarch
    Cheap Joes Starving artist size 2 round
    Wisnor and Newton size 12 round- Eclipse


    About brushes: Filbert brushes can do basically anything. If you got only one brush I would get a very nice long filbert, you could easily do a whole painting with just one.

    As for my pallette:
    Underpainting white/ Flake white hue- winsor newton
    ( actual flake white has lead in it. If you get it, don't eat it.)
    Yellow Ochre light- rembrandt
    Transparent Red Oxide- rembrandt
    Cadmium Red Medium- rembrandt
    Permanent Madder Deep- rembrandt
    Ultramarine Blue- Old Holland
    Lamp Black- Winsor and Newton.
    These are the only colors I used in this painting, but I also have raw umber, viridian, and cadmium yellow medium on my palette as well.


    So now to the painting. Im painting on a 8x8 clayboard ampersand panel. But you can paint on just about anything that can be gesso'd. Also shellac'd wood is nice to paint on. for a really cheap support, go to Lowes or something similar and pick up some masonite, it's usually a huge panel, I got mine for $6.50 and they cut it for free. I got 18 16x16 panels out of it.

    The hardest part of painting is drawing. A bad painting over a good drawing can sometimes turn out OK, but not even the best paint handling can salvage a poor drawing.
    My panel was washed with Transparent Oxide Red, and I'm now also using it for the major lines that I see in the composition:


    While I was putting in the lines, I also varied the thickness and that served to show me where some of the darkest darks in the comp. were. Now Im just adding the lightest lights. This doesn't look too pretty but it's the foundation of your painting and is very important. After painting a lot, im sure your brush calligraphy would improve and even these could look pretty, but it need not be very special.


    These next two are me just getting a bit of paint on the surface. I start pretty thin and work my way up to the juicy stuff. In these stages I'm kind of just searching until I get a color note that I think is right, then I can relate all other colors to it. The cloth so far is varying mixtures of yellow ochre/ Transparent Oxide Red/ Cadmium Red Medium/ and Permanent Madder Deep

    Here I'm getting into some of the highlights in those nice folds. Yum.


    In this picture I'm dealing with the background some. It's important to keep things in the right priority, so I won't be giving it too much attention. Mostly just Transparent Oxide Red and Yellow Ochre


    When doing a painting Alla Prima ( in one session) it's important not to let too much of the painting develop while leaving some too far behind, so I'm getting a bit of color and adjustment in the vase.


    Here I've put even more color into the vase, and put the wiggly vase edge thing in. I've also put in the major shadow shapes in the folds. That was mostly done with Ultramarine Blue, with a bit of Lamp Black and White to tone down the intensity.


    These next too are just some rendering, not much to say really. I make sure that the cloth doesn't over power the vase, and I keep the edges mostly soft except for the ones in the major foreground. Varying edges helps a painting a lot. Let only the focal point have hard edges, then as you branch out, firm, then soft, and finally lost edges.



    All the basic stuff is done now. This last little step is just putting on nice thick paint. Thick paint Is one of the many ways to prioritize things.
    To make sure the vase fits in, I made sure to incorporate some of the warmer colors insides its reflections. It's something subtle that goes a long way.


    I hope at least one of you finds this helpful, I would be super happy If I got to see some of you pick up oil painting!

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  16. #42
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    Amazing you have improved so much scince your first post. Your life oil painting are very eye pleasing. You just made me miss oil painting haha.
    Keep it up cant wait to see more!

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  17. #43
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    your oil paintings are really really great, and that tutorial helped me a lot! I have a questions though, how do you keep the colors from mixing when you dont want them too? like on the blue vase, how did you get your blue to stay blue and not turn purple?

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  18. #44
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    OmertA: Thank you very much, and I'm glad I made you miss oil painting, I'd love to be that artist who's work just makes you want to go paint!

    erinel: Thank you :] I'm glad to hear it! Are you talking about the orange/ red that the blue was painted over? If so it's because the wash was dry BUT even if you had a wet wash of paint underneath, as long as it was thin enough, any thick paint on top would pretty much cover it. Not to mention any little bits and pieces that show through only help to unify the painting :]

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  19. #45
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    A self portrait
    8x10, Oil on canvas

    Detail:

    I've got 5 years to be doing this:
    [img]self_portrait_portrait_1629.jpg[/img]

    Palette: Transparent Oxide Red( Rembrandt)
    Underpainting White( Winsor and Newton)
    Yellow Ochre Light ( Rembrandt)
    Lamp Black ( Winsor and Newton)
    Viridian ( Rembrandt)
    Raw Umber ( Winsor and Newton)

    I'm actually, Kinda proud of this.

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  20. #46
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    Cool shit dude, love it!

    Quote Originally Posted by gutss View Post
    yesterday, God came to me in a dream and told me that if I don't become a comic book artist, he has decreed that I shall instead be a burlesque dancer.
    And I said, "But God, nice panties are so expensive!"
    And he said, "Welp, I suppose you better shut up and draw."


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  21. #47
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    The self-portrait was really well done, in my opinion. It's clear you've been putting in alot of work on studies and practices, and the progress is showing. Something I'd personally like to see more of would be your more "creepy" type drawings, like you see towards the beginning of the sketchbook. While the last stuff has been very well done, I really see more personality in the other things, and I'd love to be seeing more. I think that your approach to some of the "creepier" things was interesting, and you might even try combining that subject matter with your painting skills, and see how that changes things, for better or worse. Keep up the good work for sure, and keep posting, please!

    Constructive Criticism welcomed at My Sketchbook!
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  22. #48
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    This was a fun trip =]
    The art style you have is really motivating me to move ahead!
    You're SO lucky with all teh resources you have >_<.
    Make crazy use of them or I'll have to kill you and take your spot

    keep having fun

    Dissociation

    "In Art, the hand cannot execute anything higher than the heart can imagine." -Ralph Waldo Emerson

    The Mind Dungeon:
    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=151867
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  23. #49
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    Hey, man! Wooow! Your work has improved exponentially since the first few posts. Really tremendous progress here. I'm looking forward to your next updates.

    I've declined SCAD's offer to study there and have selected UT. Perhaps our paths will cross in another time or another life, but best of luck with your time there.

    Time for another update!

    Only the heart intrinsically noble can succeed...
    Check out My Sketchbook: Leave critiques, encouragement, and good jokes within.

    www.enmls.com
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  24. #50
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    I can see some great improvements since the beginning.

    Your style, your lines and the way you show your brush strokes... Gods. I like them.

    I especially like your self portrait. The light and the atmosphere... Nice. Really nice. But there are some minor errors at least to my eyes. It kinda looks like your eyes are different colour in the pic. Is that intentional or did you just try to show the shadows? I also think that your left side (viewer's right) is way wider than the other side of the face even though the nose implies that it's from straight from the front. But I still, of course, just love it!

    "Not all those who wander
    are lost"
    -J.R.R. Tolkien

    MY JOURNEY(SKETCHBOOK)
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  25. #51
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    Jailhouserock2: Thanks : D
    Taven: Unfortunately with the path I want to pursue I don't know if my " creepy" stuff will ever appear in the same way it has before- any ideas I have floating in my head that may use that will only do so a bit more subtly, thankyou.
    Dissociation: Thankyou, I definitely will :]
    IanE: an update in need is right!
    Sadeter: Thankyou. Yes the eyes differ based on shadows, they use the same pigments. There are alot of little proportional discrepencies- I will work on these next time I do a self portrait :]

    I've been painting two new friends Manne and Quin. I think I'll turn them into a little series. these are just a few, im not completely satisfied with any of these, but some are simply turkeys and others have some things going for them




    and also, an Acrylic painting. A muse. Someday I hope to be able to paint all the beauty I see in her.


    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  26. #52
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    hi good studies!
    i recommend you to try oils on a bigger canvas. like at least 30cmx40cm but better 50cmx70cm or even bigger. your pictures will get less muddy/lumpy from a technical point. id like to see the results! i think it will also fit your somewhat loose painting style as well! cheers

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  27. #53
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    thankyou Katzenminze: The reason these are so small is because they were all daily paintings done in a matter of an hour or too; I doubt I could finish paintings those sizes in a day!

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  28. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Pariano View Post
    Taven: Unfortunately with the path I want to pursue I don't know if my " creepy" stuff will ever appear in the same way it has before- any ideas I have floating in my head that may use that will only do so a bit more subtly, thankyou.
    What path are you trying to pursue? I don't mean that as a snarky comment (sometimes tone is hard to tell on the internet), I'm actually curious. Do you want to be a professional working artist, or see it as a side hobby? What topics interest you? I think that "creepy" stuff appearing differently could be interesting, but it's my personal thought that seeing more of it would be interesting. If your interest is leading you elsewhere, then go for it!

    I don't have alot of helpful critique advice right now. I think it's cool how your photos of your work capture the textures, both of the canvas and the paint. I think that your anatomy on the Muse painting might be a touch off... Maybe a bit too skinny on the head, though that could just be a trick of the shading, the darker shading on her head making it look smaller then it is, because the pole is shaded too. I like the lighting on her face, and the reflected pinkish/red glow, as well.

    Keep it up.

    Constructive Criticism welcomed at My Sketchbook!
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  29. #55
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    Taven: I see my future as having my own gallery and studio- possibly when I get good enough holding workshops and maybe being a high school art teacher for a little bit. Also freelance illustration and such when time allows; thinking of which, that might allow me to do my creepy stuff :]
    You're right about the head, it is too skinny. Of course the model likes it because it's flattering :p
    Although talking about creepy stuff, I've been working on an idea for a video game, even done some concept art and pixel art for it. And it's full of demons! Ill show some of the progress on that. Heres a little moleskine with just ideas.


    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  30. #56
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    So I watched a movie on picasso the other day. And it's not wrong to say that all of this was done in a kind of fist shake towards him. IMO he chose to be an important artist instead of a good one, and there was henry mattisse so he didn't even really need to be him. The little shit painted gold apparently when he was like 13. The portrait of his father and his self portrait have beautiful brush strokes and show a bravado few artists have.
    I have to step this shit up a notch.




    First one was an hour and a half, second about an hour, and the last two probably around 70 to 80 minutes.

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
    [[Sketchbook]]
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  31. #57
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    If I can offer an opinion, it seems you're trying to do several things at once.
    Learn composition, learn color, learn values, learn to input several types of brush-strokes, and so on.

    How about just simply choosing one a day/week and focusing on that?
    Make a alla prima burned umber grisaille, check if all the lines are correct, if the shadowshapes are correct(don't care about the values, at first ofcourse) and see if the image gives the same impression as what you have before you(most important part this, a line can be slightly different, but if it gives out the feeling of an image better, use it. But don't go actively searching for these lines, just turn out a correct line drawing first and then see what you can alter slightly for added effect.) And don't go for impasto effects immediately, impasto is emphasis on form, if used uncontrolled it just rips the piece to shreds focuswise.
    Just start a piece, give yourself an hour to get all the lines and shadowplanes right, scrape the canvas down with sansodor or odorless white spirit, let it dry for an hour and start again. (very cheap way to practise basic brush handling as well as getting the lines correct with little effort. If you have the basic construction in order, all the rest will fall more or less in place and errors will be less pronounced.)

    After all of this, start working with 5 values, white unto burned umber or vandyke brown(chose a favorite, vandyke is much darker). Half hour for the drawing, half hour to put in the values. (buy some really large tubes, very cheap, and fill them with the 3 remaining values between white and burned umber, this way you can practise values without having to worry about losing time with mixing every base value over and over again.)

    After that, just start experimenting with adding 2 colors, a red and a yellow ochre and go from there.

    Always remember to look at the big picture first through values, after that smaller values and then ultimately color.

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  32. #58
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    Dude, I think you're on the right track to becoming a fantastic artist. You're young and obviously tenatious about learning, exploring, experimenting, practising... I wish I had that drive and sense of purpose when I was your age! I'd be much further along in my artistic development today were that the case. However, we have a lifetime to become better artists so I guess there's no rush - we'll always be learning, improving, discovering... I love that. Just keep doing what you do and enjoy the journey, have fun man... I mean, why be an artist (or anything in life) if we don't enjoy it, right? Can't wait to see more of your work. Cheers!

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  33. #59
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    Gorgeous work! (:

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  34. #60
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    Thankyou for your comments, I didn't realize anyone had visited this.
    Hyskoa: Thankyou for your advice. My goals and natural tendencies as an artist get me into trouble. Sometimes when I'm not tackling all of these problems at once, Its a lack of balls on my part- and also, along with studying, I do have an urge to create Art- which is much different than studies. Although not much of my work here shows that. Thanks for taking the time out to comment.

    ArtJunkie: thankyou for your very kind words :]

    LaurenMagpie: Thanks :]

    I should be better about updating this sketchbook; but I also have a blog:

    chrispariano.blogspot.com

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
    [[Sketchbook]]
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