Dynamic pose attempt
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  1. #1
    Zanroth is offline apreciates blunt brutal honesty Level 1 Gladiator: Andabatae
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    Dynamic pose attempt

    Posing has always been one of my personal issues.
    Therefore I tried tackling it head on.

    I'm don't know if I managed.
    Any crits would be welcome.

    At this point, the design itself is nowhere near finalised.
    Right now, I'm just interested in getting the pose right.

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  2. #2
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    You seem to be pushing the pose further, but what you seem to be lacking is a "line of action". The line of action would normally run from head to toes in your rough sketch.

    My sketchbook is here

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  4. #3
    Zanroth is offline apreciates blunt brutal honesty Level 1 Gladiator: Andabatae
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    Quote Originally Posted by softocean View Post
    You seem to be pushing the pose further, but what you seem to be lacking is a "line of action". The line of action would normally run from head to toes in your rough sketch.

    My sketchbook is here
    What do you mean with "line of action"?
    Should I plot out the motion

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    Zanroth,

    I'm guessing you've never been to a life-drawing class. That's the Nekkid People classes to you and me!

    A great advantage to those classes are the warm-up 'gesture' drawings. These 5, 10 & 30 second poses, the 2 & 5 minute poses that you do before you do the longer-posed drawings. The reason these things are so important, is it forces you to utilize your skills (and you do have some good ones) to rely upon your instincts! Utilizing your instincts forces you to be very decisive on how you draw your pictures.

    Your drawing looks like you did no preliminary 'underdrawing' in preparation to your finished piece. You really need to work out all the specifics in your character's pose, the overall composition of your drawing, and the attitude & behavior of your character, all before you start to do your refined drawing. Otherwise, you end up with a drawing that looks so stiff and lifeless, that it just lays flat and boring.

    I recently posted about this subject at length, here.

    Until you're able to attend one of these classes - or until you're old enough (?) - you can practice this when you take a sketchbook EVERYWHERE with you. Whenever you see someone standing still, do a 5-second sketch, trying to capture the essence of their body gesture. Practice sketching environments (parks, restaurants, your living room), but do all your sketching WITH INK PENS! The reason is, it will make you always try to get things right the first time, and you won't be able to erase anything. It's a really great way to discipline your drawing skills.

    You have skills. You just need to become 'philosophical' with them. What I mean by that is, you need to take those skills to draw lines, and you must show everyone you know how to interpret shapes and textures and lighting in such a way that is CONVINCING! This has to do with emphasis of line, contrasting the various soft & hard textures throughout your characters & environments.

    Remember, you're not drawing objects. You're drawing lines and textures that REPRESENT objects. There is a very important distinction between the two.

    Since you're drawing something robotic, it's hard to determine what skill level you're on. But from what I see, you're just beginning to learn about everything. I do enjoy the drawing, though. It does have charm.

    Please post drawings of other things. You know, characters! Environments! Characters in environments! This way, you'll be able to get much better criticism on your drawing, because WE'LL ACTUALLY GET TO SEE YOU DRAWING STUFF!

    Otherwise, all we see is your attempt to draw cylindrical shapes in the form of a robot, which really doesn't show off your drawing skills.

    Show us more!

    Good luck...

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  7. #5
    Zanroth is offline apreciates blunt brutal honesty Level 1 Gladiator: Andabatae
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    I've never been to any serious art class in my life.

    you were right about me doing this one in one run.
    Attached is one I did in stages at least half a year ago.

    Though a different theme and outdated, did it yield any better results in your opinion?

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    Zanroth,

    Hmm. I'm seeing a pattern, here.

    I like that you have a brain that is able to assemble elements of things that 'read' well enough. I see that's a sidewalk. I see the various elements that comprise a building. I have no idea what that figure is inside that alcove, but I do see that's some kind of robot sitting on the sidewalk.

    This shows me nothing about your ability to draw real things. This is what I'd call a nice 'hobby drawing', which means this is obviously what you do over and over, maybe as some sort of soothing agent for your brain, so you don't go out on a killing spree when you get frustrated because you ran out of Pop-Tarts.

    When you want to show your work for serious critique on these forums, I'd suggest you start showing us drawings that demonstrate your drawing abilities. Whenever you draw robots, it's difficult to determine where you need work in such things as anatomy, tonality, texture, character... all we see is your version of a robot.

    What are we all going to do, argue over the accuracy of the rivets in the robot's joints? It is a waste of time to do that. I'd much rather spend my valuable time communicating to you about your actual drawing abilities.

    You want to draw robots all the time? You have to start by learning how to draw, period. Every good illustrator who draws science fiction stuff, learned how to draw every basic thing to begin with. People! Animals! Perspective! Trees, cars, buildings, everything else there is! THEN they were able to apply all that great knowledge to their fantastic imaginations, which allowed them to make very convincing worlds and situations.

    If all you have to show are your hobby drawings, then I have to determine that you're not serious about learning how to get better, and then I'll move on and not spend my time trying to give you constructive criticism. There's not much to critique only on drawings you do as your hobby. And I suspect that after a while, others will move on, too. All you'll end up with are posts from people who say "wow, cool robot", which won't help you at all.

    So, if you wish to be serious with your artwork, then it's time to GET serious with it! Time to start doing the hard work I suggested in my previous post, by taking a sketchbook with you everywhere you go, sketching people, places & things, SEVERAL TIMES EVERY DAY. It's never too early to get serious about what could be a great career for you.

    If you're as young as I think you are, then you're already farther ahead with your skills than many others around your age. DO NOT get stuck drawing the same 'fun' thing over and over again, to the exclusion of challenging yourself to do actual drawings! If you do, then you will train yourself to always avoid the hard work that everyone must do in order to get better.

    Don't do that.

    So, please post a drawing of something REAL, so we can better help you to improve your drawing abilities. You're the one making it difficult for us to help you, when you only post things that are based upon your own subjectively abstract viewpoint.

    How's this for an idea? Come back and post some drawings that you've done of some complex environments, like a parking lot, a restaurant, or some place in your school, making sure you pick an interesting angle. In addition, include several drawings of real people sitting, standing or whatever you can draw that is sitting long enough for you draw them. Also (did you think I was done yet?), I'd love to see you draw some really interesting trees, including the surroundings they're in.

    This will give everyone a great idea as to what your skill level is, and then you'll start to get some criticism that will actually help you to improve!

    Interesting concept, huh?

    I look forward to seeing what you have to show!

    Good luck!

    Last edited by magnut; January 7th, 2008 at 09:31 PM.
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  9. #7
    Zanroth is offline apreciates blunt brutal honesty Level 1 Gladiator: Andabatae
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    Current age: 22

    The accuracy of your analysis was, to be honest, quite scary.
    Drawing more scenery was in line with my plan of "learn how to draw backgrounds!", So I'll get right on it.

    At this point I'm stuck in a higher education course that's pretty much going nowhere for me, and takes us a lot of my time.

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    Zanroth,

    Before I go off on a long posting about how best to improve yourself in the shortest amount of time, I would like to know:

    - What are your longterm goals?

    - Do you wish to become a professional illustrator, or graphics artist, or animator?

    - If so, what are you willing to do in order to achieve this?

    I don't want to blather on about something you're not interested in.

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  11. #9
    Zanroth is offline apreciates blunt brutal honesty Level 1 Gladiator: Andabatae
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    Life is too hectic for to make any real specific long term goals...

    But if you insist...

    My main interest is going into game design, specifically directing, character design, programming or cutscene animation.
    I want to eventually design an MMORPG, using what I have learned from those I've taken part in.

    Other than that, I would be interested in doing a series of comic book short stories, mainly as a means of getting better, but also as a way of catching the right amount of attention.

    I definitely want to become a professional graphic artist at a point in my life, or perhaps overly optimistic, an engineer with a feel for aesthetics.

    What I'm willing to do... These day's I always try drawing at least one thing each day, or at least take a closer look at works of others that I find to my liking and attempt to mentally disect what really makes them work.

    Also, I noticed that my current method of posting will eventually create a lot of chaos here, therefore I'll try keeping all my stuff in this thread from now on:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=114882

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