Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 45
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post

    Please please help me,will i ever be able to create art?

    doublepost sry
    Last edited by theblueroom; January 7th, 2008 at 09:01 AM.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    2,139
    Thanks
    1,953
    Thanked 524 Times in 356 Posts
    Talent has little to do with being able to create great art. Granted, some people have a talent for color or a talent to see darker images or candy-floss fun images, due to their inherent life memories and imprints, but talent is largely a myth.

    We have young artists who are already producing excellent art in their teens, but this is usually because they have practiced more and spent their childhood focusing on artistic endeavors and drawing skills. Coordination and focus on dedication to the arts is more important than anything, once you get a good education in the arts you will see that it is more about learning the process that goes hand in hand with drawing and painting that decides your "talent" than any mysterious x factor...

    A good atelier is the first stop towards becoming a great artist. We all have the ability to touch universe, as a human being....
    ---- -
    sehertu mannu narāṭu ina pānāt šagapīru ningishzidda
    abrahadabra

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,679
    Thanks
    699
    Thanked 596 Times in 283 Posts
    It's more about years of hard work. Not to say "talent" doesn't play a role.
    See MCMs thread here http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=870

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Gastonia, N.C.
    Posts
    187
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
    Might I suggest some anatomy books? Look into George Bridgeman and Andrew Loomis. They'll get you started on the path to... holy moly drawing skills.
    Helps us on our journey. Comments and critiques are welcome.

    Sketchgroup

    One Sketch

    .empyrean's. sketchbook

    DanTang's sketchbook

    Dmotym's sketchbook

    Nigh7shad3's sketchbook

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    128
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Art is about training and how much effort you put into it.
    Best wishes.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    My personal opinion is this:
    Some people naturally have advantages like being able to think in 3D whereas others can't however everyone has the ability to learn to do these things with practice. if you follow the tips on this site and work at your art every day you will improve to the high standards set by some of the amazing artists here.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    810
    Thanks
    159
    Thanked 127 Times in 76 Posts
    Seems like you are having a strong determination to pursue art, and I think that is the only thing that you need to start with. It would be a shame if you give up hope.

    You set a big goal for yourself, which is great, but you need to break it up into small series of achievable goals. Start with something more simple then gradually move on to more complex stuff.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Post Help.

    Talent is a myth. It is fake. To be more correct, it only exists in small forms. A natural talent for drawing circles, or being good with colors, or being able to think in 3D.

    This is all given to us through past experiences in our lives in which in some way, for some reason, we have learned to think in 3D, or we have learned how colors look good together, or we have learned the true shape of a circle is a square with infinite sides and we are able to picture that in our mind.

    Notice that everything I have said has been -learned-. This means that there is still hope. Anyone given determination, spirit, patience, and a love for art will be able to create art that is enjoyable to themselves and others.

    One of the problems here is that you are comparing yourself to professional artists who have been studying and drawing for many years. You have apparently been trying very hard, but somebody somewhere has not told you the right things.

    Here is what you should do:
    Draw. Go, do it. I don't care if you don't finish it, or if it doesn't look good, or if that part doesn't look right, or if the colors are off, or anything, just draw. After drawing, create a Sketchbook on these forums and post whatever your drew. From there you will get the help that you need.

    You have trouble picturing something because you don't know what it looks like. For instance, if you try to draw a human, I am sure you will fail. That is ok! We all fail! You need to study and learn what you are going to draw untill you teach yourself through practive to be able to draw from your mind.

    You need to start somewhere. I am starting with people. Andrew Loomis, Riven Phoenix, they will teach you proportions and anatomy. Search on the forums, we have some good lessons on perspective. You need to learn how to draw before you can be creative. The youngins who already know how to draw know how to draw because they have been doing it for a good amount of their life and children learn different than adults (although I am not sure of your age).

    Anyways, sorry for this being so long, some of my posts turn into huge rants sometimes. Go, Create a sketchbook! This is the right place to be.
    Last edited by MCImaginary; December 26th, 2007 at 09:02 PM. Reason: adding
    Genius is only a greater aptitude for patience.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,795
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 759 Times in 489 Posts
    I am the world's most powerful psychic, so I looked into the future and the answer is NO. You will never be able to produce art like the pros. My advice is for you to quit.

    Just messing around.
    MindCandyMan's thread was suggested but I don't think that's relevent to your question, hardly any of us come here wanting to paint pieces of fruit and shit like that, hehe. Instead I would suggest archipelago's thread http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...30#post1580030, he's made a whole bunch of improvement in a little under 2 years, specifically working on drawing from the mind, compare the first page and the last.

    Being able to draw boxes from any angle is something that's helpful when drawing from the mind. A box in perspective usually makes a 6 sided shape, so if you where drawing a head for example, you can apply that concept by enclosing it's shape with 6 lines.
    With experience you'll also find that most things will fit into from 3 to 6 sided shapes. If you can imagine that simple shape and then draw it, you'll have a good start for the rest of the drawing. One way to practice is to look at something in life or a photo, and find the simple shape that encloses it, then without looking at the thing anymore look at your paper and draw the simple shape. You should find that the drawing reminds you of the actual image, if you get the beginning right you can feel your way towards the end by trial and error. I've heard that method called "blocking in", or "the envelope", it's usually explained a little different by everyone, sometimes it's not explained.

    Also make a clear distinction in your mind between simple shapes and compound shapes. Simple shapes are composed of all convex angles(not sure of the proper mathematical way to state that), the circle being the best example of it.
    Compound shapes are made from groups of simple shapes. The number 8 is an easy example of a compound shape, where the shapes join you find concave angles.

    You should have at least two basic ways to draw: drawing from the outside in, and drawing from the inside out. "Blocking in" would be drawing from the outside in. Gesture drawing, drawing the bones first then the figure, drawing the perspective lines first then building off that, all would be drawing from the inside out. Have to look at various books and videos to find examples of those, there's various art book threads you can find with the search function.

    Just so you know, it takes tons of study and practice to get decent drawing skills. It's frustrating, you'll want to quit a lot of times, you'll get tired of it, you'll hit platues and won't be making any improvement for months at a time, you won't know where to find the answer, you won't even know what the question is most times, and it's usually a thankless job, no one is going to be with you when you're out life drawing, most of the drawings you make will never be seen by anyone but you.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Art is what you can get away with. I can't recall who said it, but it's worked for me so far.
    Last edited by Disembrained; December 26th, 2007 at 10:52 PM. Reason: Clarification

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    242
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
    Truth is art is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.

    Talent is a nebulous concept at best, a downright misleading one at worst. It does exist but it is not necessary for success. At the most talent merely makes the journey a little bit easier, it's not an instant amazing artist pill, it just can help you grasp certain things about bit easier. Talent is more an inclination than anything. Some people have an inclination to understanding colour better, or an inclination to understanding form better. Hard work and practice though will get anyone though with or without talent.

    Generally someone with no natural talent but application will be far more successful than someone with loads of natural talent but no application. Talent only gets someone so far if they don't practice and refine their ability.

    I have a natural talent for carpentry, doesn't mean that I get everything right the first time I pick up a piece of wood to make it into something. My main talent is that I'm good at judging and refining wood, I still have days when talent isn't enough and I have to learn a new skill in order to create what I want to make.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post
    Thanks for all your answers. They gave be a bit more hope. I try to make a sketchbook here and i plan to spend some hours a day for drawing.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my own thoughts.
    Posts
    1,359
    Thanks
    434
    Thanked 561 Times in 256 Posts
    Please please help me,will i ever be able to create art?
    I see you're trying to make art, would you like to:

    - give up.
    - try again.
    - rant on the CA forums.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by MCImaginary View Post
    Talent is a myth. It is fake. To be more correct, it only exists in small forms. A natural talent for drawing circles, or being good with colors, or being able to think in 3D.
    Bullshit!!! Frank Frazetta, George Gershwin, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Mozart, Einstein, Orson Welles, Hirschfeld, Frank Lloyd Wright, Segovia, Brian Wilson, Klimt, Gene Hackman, Marlon Brando, Michaelangelo, Rodin, Speilberg, James Cameron, Fechin, Mucha, Buster Keaton, Isaac Newton.

    No dumbing down! There are extraordinary people in this world. Get used to it.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my own thoughts.
    Posts
    1,359
    Thanks
    434
    Thanked 561 Times in 256 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Bullshit!!! Frank Frazetta, George Gershwin, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Mozart, Einstein, Orson Welles, Hirschfeld, Frank Lloyd Wright, Segovia, Brian Wilson, Klimt, Gene Hackman, Marlon Brando, Michaelangelo, Rodin, Speilberg, James Cameron, Fechin, Mucha, Buster Keaton, Isaac Newton.

    No dumbing down! There are extraordinary people in this world. Get used to it.
    So you say that if I worked harder and smarter and longer than a frazetta I'd still be worse than him?
    Well aren't you mr happy.

    They are people just like everybody else that just did an insane amount of work and kept doing that insane amount of work every day of their life.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,570 Times in 755 Posts
    They are people just like everybody else that just did an insane amount of work and kept doing that insane amount of work every day of their life.
    No. They also had great moments in life or were able notice them and get inspired to do great things. Work and only work will make you lifeless machine.
    Last edited by Farvus; December 27th, 2007 at 11:34 AM.

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    128
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    I don't agree with some of the posters here. Talent DOES exist. It is called natural aptitude. And some people are more gifted than others. That's the cold hard fact.
    For me and as well for other aritists. Creating art is an innate thing. I DON'T EVEN KNOW WHY I CAN DRAW. Like comic penciller Jim Lee said he doesn't even know why he can draw better than the next guy. he is afraid that he wakes up one day and forgets how to draw. When I look back at work I did 1 year ago, they look comparatively horrible. So if one keeps practice, one WILL improve.

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,795
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 759 Times in 489 Posts
    You were also talking about "visualization". I used to think that was necessary when I first started too. It's better to accept the way you already think and work with that, changing it is just extra effort and I doubt it's possible without a team of specialist working with you, giving you mind altering drugs and what not.

    "Then i want to start to draw it and i have NO picture in my head. I start then to draw eyes or something and even before i finished them, i notice that the eyes i drawed are just normal shapes which i copied from some eyes i have drawn before. They didnt came from my imagination, my visuals in my head. "
    There is nothing wrong with this, you've just made a discovery without realizing it. There is no way to directly transmit what's in our minds on to the paper, it has to be changed into a different form before it can be rendered. I would recommend E.H. Gombrich's "Art and Illusion" for more info on that.
    Consider writing. We don't previsualize the words on the screen or the paper before writing them. When we talk we don't prehear our words before saying them. The "normal shape" you spoke of is part of your visual vocabulary, an equivalent you use to represent an eye. Once you're aware of it you can work on making it more expressive, looking at photos and life, find ways to make it less generic.

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    So you say that if I worked harder and smarter and longer than a frazetta I'd still be worse than him?
    Try it and see. He was already considered a genius by the age of 8.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    Well aren't you mr happy.
    Actually I'm *Dr.* Happy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    They are people just like everybody else that just did an insane amount of work and kept doing that insane amount of work every day of their life.
    Uh huh... nice little bedtime story ya got there. All tucked away in your cozy bedroom, dreaming. I've known quite a number of obsessive artists who spend endless hours churning out crap and never do anything else. Frazetta, by his own admission, was a goof off. He believed that this fact was *one of the keys* to the life present in his pictures.

    There are *stunning* ink drawings by Frazetta that were drawn in one sitting without a pencil under-drawing. There is no better illustration of the existence of extraordinary talent than the existence of these works...
    Last edited by kev ferrara; December 27th, 2007 at 04:36 PM.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my own thoughts.
    Posts
    1,359
    Thanks
    434
    Thanked 561 Times in 256 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Try it and see. He was already considered a genius by the age of 8.
    And I'm quite sure that wasn't told by fans or family.
    Actually I'm *Dr.* Happy.
    Totally missed the point there doc.
    Uh huh... nice little bedtime story ya got there. All tucked away in your cozy bedroom, dreaming. I've known quite a number of obsessive artists who spend endless hours churning out crap and never do anything else.
    Never do anything else, so, not exactly working smarter.
    Frazetta, by his own admission, was a goof off. He believed that this fact was *one of the keys* to the life present in his pictures.
    Frazetti contributing to his own myth? Noooooooooooooo. Gtfo. Anyway, what is goofing off for one person might be slavery for another.
    There are *stunning* ink drawings by Frazetta that were drawn in one sitting without a pencil under-drawing.
    Yes, because lightboxes weren't invented and fire doesn't destroy paper.
    There is no better illustration of the existence of extraordinary talent than the existence of these works...
    Let's just say that they won't convince me of your way and neither will the other way around.
    But for me that is a defeatist mentality. That you need to be a genious to create awesome work. Would surely suck for the mass of the population who doesn't happen to be one.

    I mean, why would you even need average people by that reasoning, just whipe them all out and keep the genii since all they'll ever achieve is average.

  22. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    I think Frazetta's work stands by itself, despite myth or marketing. The above images should demonstrate his extra-ordinary skills to all but the most stubborn and close-minded.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  23. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my own thoughts.
    Posts
    1,359
    Thanks
    434
    Thanked 561 Times in 256 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    I think Frazetta's work stands by itself, despite myth or marketing. The above images should demonstrate his extra-ordinary skills to all but the most stubborn and close-minded.
    Looks absolutely fabulous. And is achievable by everybody who works hard and smart enough and chooses to further develop that style.

  24. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    Looks absolutely fabulous. And is achievable by everybody who works hard and smart enough and chooses to further develop that style.
    And if I were taller, I could be as good as Kobe Bryant.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  25. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my own thoughts.
    Posts
    1,359
    Thanks
    434
    Thanked 561 Times in 256 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    And if I were taller, I could be as good as Kobe Bryant.
    Depends on a perfect distribution of physical attributes as well as a perfect game insight through years of practise. The insight you can get through sufficiënt study, the physical attributes are different with every person and the time to adjust all of them would take such a long time that you'd not only need a countless amount of surgeries but also would be too old to start playing.
    But possible yeah.
    Now stop being a negative glumbum.

  26. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,602
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,499 Times in 747 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Try it and see. He was already considered a genius by the age of 8.
    That surprises me, actually. I have reproductions of some of his early Shining Knight comics and they're just...awful. Really below average. As a result, I've always thought of Frazetta as someone who got as good as he got by a great deal of drawing over a long period of time.

    That said, there is unquestionably such a thing as talent, and it's distributed among the population in uneven amounts. Having talent is no guarantee of success, and hard work is probably a better predictor of professional attainment...but I'm guessing nobody gets to the tippy top without a good deal of both.
    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).

  27. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Cold north
    Posts
    1,511
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 699 Times in 166 Posts
    Kev, you're such a provoker "

    Talent, artistic control of medium, and intuition has become somewhat confused. In fact, what we call intuition in art is extremely misleading. While the root of the word in Latin, intuitus, means "to look at or to contemplate," the English usage has come to indicate a special kind of knowing, "knowledge or cognition without rational thought." The dictionary definition also lists such descriptions of meaning as "immediate apprehension or cognition" and "quick and ready insight." The combination adds to the confusion. Immediate apprehension of meaning in visual matters makes it all seem too easy to be taken seriously intellectually. And the artist is unjustly stripped of his special genius.

    Any visual venture, no matter how simple, basic, or lowly, involves making something that was not there before, making palpable that which does not yet exist. But anyone can make or design something, even if it is only a mud pie. There are criteria to be applied to the process and to our judgement of it. Sudden inspiration, mindlessness, is not an acceptable force in design. Careful planning, intellectual probing, technical knowledge are necessities in visual pre-planning and design. The artist must seek through his compositional strategies solutions to the questions of beauty and functionality, of balance and the mutual support of form and content. His quest is highly intellectual; his options through choice of techniques must be cerebral and in control. Creating in the visual mode at multiple levels of function and expression cannot be accomplished in a semi-comatose aesthetic state, no matter how blessed it allegedly is. Visual intelligence is no different than general intelligence and the control of elements of visual media presents the same problems as the mastery of any skill. To accomplish it, you must know what you are working with and how to proceed.
    "

  28. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Precocious doesn't mean professional. Just advanced for his age. There are paintings Frazetta did when he was 8 that are as good as loads of people on ca right now. (oops, did I say that out loud. )

    Yes, drawing a lot meant a lot to Frazetta's progress. Shining Knight was one of the earliest things he did, in a very difficult medium, and inking his own stuff.

    Shining knight was done when Frazetta was 22 in 1950 or so. If you look at his progression after he became serious from 1951 to 1953, that's a relatively short time and his progression was astronomical. You can see the transformation in his notebooks from 1953.

    Untamed Love and WSF 29 and the Buck Rogers covers are all from 1953 and 1954. This is not a long gestation period at all. A couple of years to go from being a kid making junk like white indian and shining knight to being the top dog in the industry in the top company (EC). At that point he was already a legend among other artists.

    To me, the evidence for his talent is not what he was doing as a kid. But his incredible progress in 1953 and how he came out of that year nearly fully formed as a talent. (There's a painting he did from 1955 of masai warriors attacking a lion that is every bit as good as anything he did in the 1960s when he supposedly "began" painting.)
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  29. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    810
    Thanks
    159
    Thanked 127 Times in 76 Posts
    I've watched the documentary about Frazetta, and he said people who do nothing but grinding artworks all day cannot do great art. Look at his biography and he kind of demonstrate that, having nice family and adventurous life.

    I have one question though, saying "these people have talent so it's the only reason they can be great" is a defeatist statement. How about "These people work hard at it all the time and all their lives is the only reason they can be that good"

    Isn't it just two sides of the same coin ?

  30. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    Depends on a perfect distribution of ....
    Babble. If you believe that one can be superior physically, but all men are created equal mentally... well, I got a bridge to sell you. Oh, btw, just because you're clueless, doesn't mean I'm being grumpy pointing that out.

    Immediate apprehension of meaning in visual matters makes it all seem too easy to be taken seriously intellectually. And the artist is unjustly stripped of his special genius.
    Eh?

    Sudden inspiration, mindlessness, is not an acceptable force in design.
    <cue buzzer noise indicating incorrect answer>

    Careful planning, intellectual probing, technical knowledge are necessities in visual pre-planning and design.
    Actually, what an artist really needs is an idea. Everything flows from that idea. Everything is adapted to the fruition of that idea, even the "rules".

    The artist must seek through his compositional strategies solutions to the questions of beauty and functionality, of balance and the mutual support of form and content.
    All that is solved immediately by a strong image held fast in the mind's eye. You can learn a million different things after that to add on to burnish the apple, but without the apple, there's no meal.

    His quest is highly intellectual; his options through choice of techniques must be cerebral and in control. Creating in the visual mode at multiple levels of function and expression cannot be accomplished in a semi-comatose aesthetic state, no matter how blessed it allegedly is. Visual intelligence is no different than general intelligence...
    This is all incorrect information, IMHO.

    and the control of elements of visual media presents the same problems as the mastery of any skill. To accomplish it, you must know what you are working with and how to proceed.
    Agreed.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  31. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my own thoughts.
    Posts
    1,359
    Thanks
    434
    Thanked 561 Times in 256 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Babble. If you believe that one can be superior physically, but all men are created equal mentally... well, I got a bridge to sell you. Oh, btw, just because you're clueless, doesn't mean I'm being grumpy pointing that out.
    Ofcourse you're not grampa.

    *Tells nurse to add more medication to the daily routine. He's scaring the grandchildren again.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How Do You Create.......
    By thomas88 in forum Photoshop
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 29th, 2009, 06:36 PM
  2. how do i create...?
    By theja in forum Photoshop
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 25th, 2008, 10:39 AM
  3. How to create this in watercolor?
    By plainbrush in forum Painter
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 4th, 2007, 05:12 AM
  4. Create your own Kicks!
    By digitalgannon in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: December 19th, 2004, 03:43 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.