Freelance Pricing?

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    63
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Red face Freelance Pricing?

    I'm new to the game concept art and texturing scene and I was wondering if anyone was familiar with pricing concerning game textures and concept art? How does one go about figuring out the value of texture work? How is texture art calculated(per pixel, per hour...)?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Rares Halmagean For This Useful Post:


  4. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Austin TX
    Posts
    10,460
    Thanks
    2,066
    Thanked 11,070 Times in 2,623 Posts
    Follows
    2
    Following
    1
    haha...no.

    there are no standard rates. each country has a different range. it all comes down to what you can do it for plus whatever profit you feel is fair. do not undersell yourself...ie work for ten dollars an hour or something silly....

    Basically take the hourly rate you would be happy with. Double it. Ask for that and if they say no, then come down from there. If you do not want to go back and forth take the hourly rate you are happy with and add twenty percent. if they say yes you just got a raise. if they say no you can come back down ten or the full twenty percent.

    mb bills hourly. Our shanghai studio bills less than our SF studio due to costs of living differences...thats what i mean about there is no standard way of pricing...it all comes down to what you can do it for. if it is a higher texture or painting resolution it just takes more time...thus the higher price. there is no per pixel price. funny thought though.


    jason

    LEVEL UP! - ConceptArt.Org online workshops are on sale- Join now and get 25% off!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Jason Manley For This Useful Post:


  6. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,567 Times in 753 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Right now I'm trying to estimate the average range for my country in proportion to USA. The more I think about it, the more it gets complicated beacause there are additional variables .

    I also recently found some good blog post about these things.
    http://cedrichohnstadt.wordpress.com...roject-part-1/

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Farvus For This Useful Post:


  8. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    63
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Smile

    That makes sense. Thanks for the input Jason! Thanks for the link Farvus. Any additional input and experiences are welcome. Thanks again guys.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Californication land
    Posts
    1,838
    Thanks
    262
    Thanked 345 Times in 141 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I price my freelancing gigs depending on what bills I gotta pay that month..hehe

    J.L. ALFARO


    "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those that mind don't matter and those that matter don't mind."
    -Dr. Seuss


    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to JL.Alfaro For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kiama, Australia
    Posts
    577
    Thanks
    167
    Thanked 148 Times in 74 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You can't ask for too much money - like Jason says, think of a rate and then double it.
    This is because:
    a) Unless you have a lot of experience at quoting, the work can often take longer than you think (though this may just be my inexperience).
    b) As a freelancer, you're not going to be getting work all the time (again, perhaps this is just me?) so you want to cover your down days (weeks perhaps?).
    c) and most importantly, because you're uber talented and the client gets what they pay for. Be confident! you are a professional arn't you? (the answer is yes by the way).

    Basically there is no set rate, you base your quote on what the budget is - just don't ever undersell yourself - it hurts EVERYBODY (except the client I guess?).

    .... ok, I'll tell you the truth... I normally charge 1c per pixel which gets me about $40,000 for your average 2048x2048 texture. Sometimes I just work at 1024x1024 and then just resize the texture to quadruple my paycheck.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    brooklyn
    Posts
    1,548
    Thanks
    82
    Thanked 199 Times in 119 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    http://freelanceswitch.com/rates/

    a handy little tool to help figure these things out

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4,543
    Thanks
    2,307
    Thanked 2,122 Times in 871 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    One of my dad's clients writes and performs club (techno) music. He was called by a restaurant wanting to purchase a 6 hour recording of his mixes. This was the first time anyone ever wanted to purchase his music. He didn't want to seem over expensive and he was battling with issues with his self esteem. He thought it would be worth about $600 ($100 an hour) but he was unsure. Just to test the surface he told them it would cost $3000. They said yes.

    Don't undersell yourself and just see what can happen. The above tactic is a good one, try it.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    63
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Excellent. You guys are a lot of help. Thank You!

    JL.Alfaro; That would seem to make sence .

    lol Puck...I know I was reaching with the per pixel pricing thing.

    invinciblewombat: Thanks for the link. I'll check it out.

    Jake Korbin: You're right. Better to ask high and then go low.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    585
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 27 Times in 23 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hell, I got people to buy 4 weapon concepts for 150 each. Each weapon takes less then an hour to do. You do the math. So in just less then 4 hours, I am $600 richer. But the one thing you have to remember, you cant just run in and say "dude! Im like the perfect one for this job!" Prove it. Have your portfolio set up with your best works, show your future employers some examples of things similar to what they want, kinda like a tattoo parlor, and get your name out there. You cant just start out and expect to make $150 an hour.

    So my advice would be dont undersell yourself like everyone says, but don't overdo it unless you got the skills and the resume to back it up.

    FUCK YOU YA PRETENTIOUS DICKS!! BAN ME!!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to Digital_Blacksmith For This Useful Post:


  17. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    right behind you...
    Posts
    348
    Thanks
    273
    Thanked 63 Times in 46 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hhhmmm... My boss does graphic design stuff for a few businesses around town and he never charges less than $20 and hour, more if it's more difficult or if he has to run around and talk to a lot of people to verify measurements or find people to actually apply the designs etc.

    If i'm drawing up a tattoo for someone, our shop as standard practice charges an initial $20 drawing deposit to even begin work on a drawing, $40 for really large pieces. (There's too many schmucks who'll just never come back, or show up a year later expecting you to have held on to the drawing for their hour and a half duration piece for all that time) Then we go by the hour as far as how long it's going to take to tattoo them. My rate is set at $100 an hour, but that's only for how long it will take to actually tattoo it, so while alot of people think that sounds unreasonable, they don't take into account that i might be spending three to five hours drawing it up. So for a two hour tattoo i'm charging approximately between 25 - 40 buck an hour, but i still have to share the profit with the shop after the fact, and i keep this in mind when people try and talk me down or haggle. I'll politely state my original rate once, and after that i go progressively higher each time they try to 'make a deal'.

    If you know what your time is worth DON'T SELL YOURSELF SHORT! If you're really serious about the work and you're going to put the time in, they'll most likely be satisfied with the finished product and not as concerned with the initial cost as one might think. I've never once heard anyone complain about the cost of a tattoo once they were finished.

    "Today, a young man on acid, realised that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration. That we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves... here's Tom with the weather." - Bill Hicks
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kiama, Australia
    Posts
    577
    Thanks
    167
    Thanked 148 Times in 74 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by KLEVR View Post
    ... I've never once heard anyone complain about the cost of a tattoo once they were finished.
    This is important I think. I've had clients who have questioned my rates and tried to haggle me down - but they only do that the first time they work with me, because after I deliver the assets they are so impressed that they fall over themselves thanking me for my skills and keep coming back for more - literally jumping up and down screaming at how good it looks, and huging me after the screening and recommending my services to all their peers*

    Well that's the idea anyway - if you charge big bucks and then manage to deliver something kick-arse that totally blows them out of the water, then you will score big respect points - much better than letting the client think you are a 'discount' freelancer that they offload all their extra rotoscoping work on to.

    * not indicative of normal freelancer-client experience.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook