Scientists Uncover Mummified Dinosaur remains.

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  1. #1
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    My heart skipped a beat when I saw that pic of its scales. That's so incredible, think of the new B movie possibilities!

    Scientists Uncover Mummified Dinosaur remains.

    I found this pic of another dinosaur mummy from American Museum of Natural History. From what I am gathering, "Dakota" seems like an even better find.

    Scientists Uncover Mummified Dinosaur remains.

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    I was pretty stoked to see this story in the newspaper this morning. Especially the bit about it possibly having striped skin. That's the first time the actual surface coloration of a dinosaur has been hinted at, as far as I know.

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    The scales are almost hexagonal...! I don't know why but that amazes me.

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    Yeah that is pretty damn awesome. First they rediscover living Coelacanths and now a mummified dinsoaur!!!

    When you consider how far and wide dinosaurs roamed and they only to date have discovered less than 10 mummified dinosaurs.

    Damn there are some good visual puns waiting to happen with this story!!

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    I didn't read the article, but steph laberis' picture of the mummified dinosaur is just awesome.
    Is that even possible or is it just a hoax?
    like .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diphallia View Post
    I didn't read the article,
    That would be your first step then, wouldn't it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Diphallia View Post
    Is that even possible or is it just a hoax?
    like .



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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    That would be your first step then, wouldn't it?

    Okay, I read it.
    Still can't believe that it's so well preserved after 67 million years.

    But they found soft tissue inside a t-rex (think it was t-rex) bone.
    So,yeah. I can believe it.
    Okay, I do.

    So this isn't a monkey stitched to a fish? (mermaid)

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    Very cool find. I remember when I first heard of the mummified Hypsolophodontid "willow" and how x-rays had revealed that it had large lungs and a large, most likely four chambered heart. Who knows what this specimen might eventually reveal. What's really mind-blowing is when I think of the prevalent image of dinosaurs when I was a kid and how that image has been so completely destroyed. Now everything has feathers and fluff and it's hard to keep up with it.

    Last edited by N D Hill; December 4th, 2007 at 06:01 PM.
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    Video Footage and more pictures of Dakota on NG website -

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...video-ngc.html

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...res/index.html

    This is amazing!!! I feel like such a giddy kid right now -

    - Visions

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    Quote Originally Posted by N D Hill View Post
    What's really mind-blowing is when I think of what the prevalent image of dinosaurs when I was a kid and how that image has been so completely destroyed.
    You think that's something, wait till scientists stop calling them "dinosaurs" and start calling them "primitive birds."

    Also, wait until the real Jurassic Park opens and you can't get in without being evangelized on by a bunch of picketing creationists.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack the R View Post
    \
    Also, wait until the real Jurassic Park opens and you can't get in without being evangelized on by a bunch of picketing creationists.
    I don't think creationists deny the fact that dinosaurs existed, plus that never happened in the Jurassic Park movies -

    - Visions

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack the R View Post
    You think that's something, wait till scientists stop calling them "dinosaurs" and start calling them "primitive birds."
    Birds came from dinosaurs, so you would actually call birds advanced dinosaurs, rather than the other way around. The species that came first has priority. By this way of thinking, dinosaurs, birds, and human beings are all just highly evolved fish.

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    This reminds of a link I saw on ytmnd. It quickly prompted me to look up the real thing to see if it was a joke or not. I still haven't decided.

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    It's important to distinguish here that this fossil is of a hadrosaur, part of a lineage that's probably more similar to crocodiles than to birds, and it's possible their last common ancestor wasn't even a true dinosaur. This is the kind of fossil that can help clarify the points of divergence between the ornithischians (hadrosaurs, stegosaurs, ceratopsians, etc.), the saurischians (sauropods, theropods, birds), and the crocodilians. The soft tissue evidence seems to be bringing many dinosaurs, such as Dakota here, closer to crocodiles, while further emphasizing the revolutionary metabolic leap the bird ancestors (the coelurosaurs, including tyrannosaurs, velociraptors, ostrich-like dinosaurs) had achieved. The amazingly diverse group of creatures we know as dinosaurs should be considered every bit as evolutionarily complex as the mammals of our own time. We have such bizarrely differentiated animals as whales and bats, platypuses and horses, Humans and armadillos. We can call them all mammals, but we have to be ready to accept that although they're all covered in fur, there are some diverse and varied mechanisms underneath. This is the kind of fossil that can help us figure out which dinosaurs were the "koalas" and which were the "bears".

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    It's amazing find indeed. Here is another article that I found interesting where "unfossilized" Tyrannosaur bones were found that still had some soft tissue and heme proteins still in it. Here is the article:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7285683/

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    Quote Originally Posted by HunterKiller_ View Post
    The scales are almost hexagonal...! I don't know why but that amazes me.
    Hexagons are the most efficient near-circular shapes to cluster together with zero wastage between, (e.g egg silo's in wasps nests)

    It's amazing that nature sussed this out so long ago....

    I imagine this particular shape allows flexibilty of movement in all directions in the skin and equal growth in all directions,

    this is an incredible story, thanks heaps Jake!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moai View Post
    Birds came from dinosaurs, so you would actually call birds advanced dinosaurs, rather than the other way around. The species that came first has priority. By this way of thinking, dinosaurs, birds, and human beings are all just highly evolved fish.
    Dinosaur means "fearfully great lizard" in Greek, "deinos" means "fearfully great" and "sauros" means "lizard." - I think a whole new taxonomical name for these creatures should be invented, something beginning with Ornis or Ornith, or Or....

    I know, - Dinosaur as a name ROCKS, and it's so ingrained into our psyche, maybe we just need a subtle change in direction....

    Deinosornia ?

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    Sounds like toothpaste for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by N D Hill View Post
    This reminds of a link I saw on ytmnd. It quickly prompted me to look up the real thing to see if it was a joke or not. I still haven't decided.


    HAHAHA! that's ludicrous!
    many thanks for the laugh!

    Brendan Noeth

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    I think the term "reptile" is probably up for redefinition from all sides. They've relatively recently abandoned the term "mammal-like reptiles" for early mammal ancestors and their kin, because the more we learn about them, the less reptilian they become, earlier and earlier. We can thus call the mammal-like reptiles, and their mammal descendants "Synapsids", and dinosaurs, birds, crocodiles, and pterosaurs should be considered "Archosaurs" (for lack of a commonly-accepted substitute for "sauros"), distinctly and fundamentally different from other reptiles such as turtles, lizards in snakes. Many archosaurs were and are warm-blooded. Some had hair-like integumentary structures. All had and have, today, four-chambered hearts, unlike turtles, lizards, and snakes. About the only thing they have in common is scales and eggs, and for a good long time there were a lot of synapsids laying eggs too. It might be safe to say that a tyrannosaurus was no more a reptile than a platypus is.

    Last edited by M.C.Barrett; December 5th, 2007 at 06:10 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mungus View Post
    Dinosaur means "fearfully great lizard" in Greek, "deinos" means "fearfully great" and "sauros" means "lizard." - I think a whole new taxonomical name for these creatures should be invented, something beginning with Ornis or Ornith, or Or....
    That's what I'm getting at, the dinosaur name doesn't fit. It's like calling Native Americans "Indians," a mistake based on ignorance. As a scientific term, "dinosaur's" days are numbered.

    Mr. Visions - Well I guess the Creationists will have nothing to object to if the real Jurassic Park is carefully cleansed of all politically incorrect, religiously offensive scientific information regarding time periods and evolution.

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    I feel as though I should be more excited about this...
    Alas, gone are the days staring in awe in the Natural History Museum. Still pretty neat, but just not awesome. Damn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by M.C.Barrett View Post
    I think the term "reptile" is probably up for redefinition from all sides. They've relatively recently abandoned the term "mammal-like reptiles" for early mammal ancestors and their kin, because the more we learn about them, the less reptilian they become, earlier and earlier. We can thus call the mammal-like reptiles, and their mammal descendants "Synapsids", and dinosaurs, birds, crocodiles, and pterosaurs should be considered "Archosaurs" (for lack of a commonly-accepted substitute for "sauros"), distinctly and fundamentally different from other reptiles such as turtles, lizards in snakes. Many archosaurs were and are warm-blooded. Some had hair-like integumentary structures. All had and have, today, four-chambered hearts, unlike turtles, lizards, and snakes. About the only thing they have in common is scales and eggs, and for a good long time there were a lot of synapsids laying eggs too. It might be safe to say that a tyrannosaurus was no more a reptile than a platypus is.
    Well there are some reptile-like mammals (with scales and such) that still exist on Earth. Obviously they are mammals by definition but from appearance they look to be a sort of mutated lizard. Creatures like armadillos and pangolins are very prehistoric looking. They are kind of what I picture the "reptilian" mammal ancestors to look like.

    Scientists Uncover Mummified Dinosaur remains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Kobrin View Post
    Well there are some reptile-like mammals (with scales and such) that still exist on Earth. Obviously they are mammals by definition but from appearance they look to be a sort of mutated lizard. Creatures like armadillos and pangolins are very prehistoric looking. They are kind of what I picture the "reptilian" mammal ancestors to look like.
    Time to update that mental picture, Jake.

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't there some confusion here among laymen on the original find. The dinosaur may be mummified, but that occured naturally after death...THEN the creature became fossilized. That means that the odds of finding ORGANIC material are zilch. The thing is still "rock."

    It would be the same as a body that became desicated in the desert, then washed into a mud field by a flash flood. If conditions are write, the "mummy" (desicated body) would then fossilize. The advantage for us is that the soft issues didn't rot before fossilization...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Kobrin View Post
    Well there are some reptile-like mammals (with scales and such) that still exist on Earth. Obviously they are mammals by definition but from appearance they look to be a sort of mutated lizard. Creatures like armadillos and pangolins are very prehistoric looking. They are kind of what I picture the "reptilian" mammal ancestors to look like.

    Scientists Uncover Mummified Dinosaur remains.
    Jake, Jake, Jake...

    I know the state of science education in the country is tragic, but that just means you have to take things into your own hands. Read a book, go to a museum, watch some NOVA or Scientific American Frontiers...

    Besides, everybody knows that a pangolin is a cross between an anteater and an artichoke.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Besides, everybody knows that a pangolin is a cross between an anteater and an artichoke.
    The Chinese must think so... here in southern China you see them for sale as food in the live markets all the time.


    On a more serious note... this is going to suck big time for the kid who discovered this. It'll wreck his life. Why?

    1) Because he will never be able to top this event in his life. At a young age he's already reached the apex of his life. It's all downhill from here.

    2) When he starts trying to use this experience to chat up women he'll soon realize it won't help him to get laid... thus he'll be reduced to soliciting ladyboys on the sly.

    A very sad state of affairs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Jake, Jake, Jake...

    I know the state of science education in the country is tragic, but that just means you have to take things into your own hands. Read a book, go to a museum, watch some NOVA or Scientific American Frontiers...

    Besides, everybody knows that a pangolin is a cross between an anteater and an artichoke.
    Well I'm just saying in my own little imagination that that's what a scaled mammal would look like. I don't really think that pangolins were running around with dinosaurs. You don't have to insult my intelligence.

    Last edited by OldJake666; December 5th, 2007 at 10:42 PM.
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