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  1. #1
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    Red face Drawing Development in Children

    I happened to stumble upon this page and found it fascinating, especially " the crisis period" and the "period of decision" stages . Im regressing back to the "scribbling" stage myself , looking back it was the most fun ....

    Drawing Development in Children


    http://www.learningdesign.com/Portfo...iddrawing.html


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  4. #2
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    I've been doing that too.

    I read this chart about a year ago and promptly picked up "Artful Scribbles," which talks about children's drawings in detail, and even draws some comparisons to modern art.
    Do you Mentler?

    Booting up a new sketchbook.

  5. #3
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    I miss drawing stuff like a kid, rolling out huge pieces of paper and drawing gigantic space stations, epic birdseye view battles and videogame levels.

    Also, that thing with 3 year olds drawing a circle with two lines representing the legs, I have heard that might be because when you look down towards your feet, you dont see the head, only the torso, so the child seems to think that that is where the head should be.

  6. #4
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    I never drew in my pre-adolescence. I just got bored one day 2 years ago, and luckily I found this site.

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    Those representative pieces look really odd.
    Are those just simulations of childrens' art?
    Because the one for "8 years" only makes sense if the child is a young Chris Ware.

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    Haha. By the time I was 2 I was drawing at the level of the 6 year old in that chart. I know because my parents saved every scribble I ever did. I don't think I ever went through the preschematic stage at all, but I defiantly did the scribble thing.

    I don't buy their explanation for teenagers quitting drawing. I doubt it's a natural process. High school is when most kids are first discouraged from pursuing art any further in life. It's very frustrating when no one believes in your goals, and if my parents had not supported me I might be at home depot right now instead of art school.

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    My mother told me once that in my early childhood I was drawing some robotic digging/farming machines with lots of different mechanical arms of various function and she was surprised that I came up with these things at such age. Unfortunately none of these drawings were kept and I wish there was at least one. I sometimes wonder what was in my head back then.
    One thing I know for sure. I made my first steps into concept design I just need to continue in that sprit. It must be my future .
    Last edited by Farvus; December 4th, 2007 at 01:29 AM.

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    Am I only the one that thinks that the 12 year old drawing is better than the 14-16 year old one? I know a lot of 14-16 year olds that can draw WAY better than that...

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    I think buildings are easier than people.

    I don't like it when people say all children go through a certain stage of development in drawing. One thing people say is that all children draw pictures with their house, their family, and the sun and stuff. I never drew anything like this, but I remember classmates that did. I mostly drew animals as a kid, and fantasy creatures in fantasy worlds. I didn't draw any cute little stick figures under rainbows. I think a lot of people want to see children's drawings as a part of someone's dna or something instead of their own personal perception of the world.
    Last edited by •Lindsay•; December 4th, 2007 at 01:02 AM.

  12. #10
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    The 8 year old one is digital!
    I must be getting old, damn kids!

  13. #11
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    the 8 and the 6 year old drawings both look digital under closer inspection, thats really exciting to see ..

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    My daughter´s definitely in the scribbling phase ... nice read and something to look forward to

    Drawing Development in Children
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  16. #13
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    Good ol' MS Paint ;P

    I remember using that and PaintShop Pro all the time when I was....8 or 9ish?? Can't remember exactly, but that's sorta when I got into character design at least. No idea where all those old scribbles are now though!
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  17. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quicksilver View Post
    Good ol' MS Paint ;P

    I remember using that and PaintShop Pro all the time when I was....8 or 9ish??
    Me too!
    By that time there was no computer in our household, so I spent almost every weekend at the local electronics store, doodling in paint on the machines they were trying to sell. xD

  18. #15
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    Sorry for the length. When I go back to my old house, I'll see if I can find some old art. And post it. Wow, I'm such a nerd, y'all don't need to read all of my long-winded post... <_< Eeek

    Age 1

    I've been drawing since I could hold a pencil... So, according to my parents, when I was 1 year old I would draw things upside-down, and they wouldn't understand what I was drawing until I turned it over, like "Ta-DA!"

    They took me to a teacher for some art training, I guess, when I was that young, and the teacher would get really mad and flip my art back upside-down because "that's the way she drew it." Yeah, what a snot. Heheh.

    Age 2-5

    When I was in my toddler phase, I drew mostly animals and people... If I can find it, I have a picture I did at the age of 3, of a monkey from behind. It's hilarious, seriously. And my people were mostly women. (I never really drew men... Unless it was, y'know, a king and a princess.) When I was 5, I went through another phase. The women were really funny... They had GINORMOUS breasts, capable of holding a tea tray. No lie. They were often profile drawing... I don't know what my problem was.

    Age 6

    When I was around 6 I was obsessed with horses, so, naturally, that's practically all I drew. I'd do some cute horses with really shiney, cute eyes. Think "My Little Pony" but a little more realistic... Sorta... Really bright stuff. All of my classmates would crowd around me and be like "I'm next! Draw me a brown one with BLUE eyes!!!"

    Age 7-8

    Still horse-obsessed. I discovered some books about horses and BAM here came the realistic ones. At this point, I started to take art lessons from a British lady living in our town named Hilary. She taught me to fill in my canvas, and she said she "didn't want to see those skinny stick legs on your horses." I made a lot of art then... Horses with actual legs, painting of an old lady in the snow with some flowers, an oil pastel drawing of a parrot with a sunset... Yeeeuppp... It was all relatively cartoonish, but, y'know.

    By age 7 or 8 I started to use photo references for my horses... I ended up
    with some pretty realistic stuff! I did this dapple gray and a thoroughbred... I think I still have the dapple gray. I was really really proud of that one. I'd do drawings of like, every horse I could find. Seriously. I'd also do, y'know, more princesses/princes, horseback riders, girls with mohawks, but it was always mostly horses. By third grade, I think I was starting to branch out... Yeah, dragon time, baby! I was getting into Harry Potter and was turning into a total fantasy geek. I really liked this one kid, too, who always wore dragons on his shirts, so there went the dragons. Onto the notebook paper. I might still have some of those awful old dragons... I was pretty proud of them, too. They were always very angular and detailed. Kind of Chinese-dragon-like, too.

    Age 9

    Grade 4, more dragons. Getting a little bit better, but still angular and kind of weird. I also started to get into more fantasy stuff, like ogres and things... Fairies were a big thing. This was the year I watched Starship Troopers. I looooove that film. Heheh.

    Age 10-11

    Grade 5 I switched from Public school to a Catholic one, just for that year, because I really didn't like the girls at my school. I just couldn't relate to them.

    That was my major fantasy peak, that year, so I was drawing ogres and elves, coming up with new breeds of fantasy creatures, griffins, dragons, etc... Ooh! Robots, also. I was totally into sci-fi. I would also draw musicians and people, mostly girls. My drawings became more realistic, with better shading, better blending of colors, etc. Also, at this point, I started to surf the internet and find online artists to inspire me. I stumbled upon fantasy artists, which led me to finding anthro art, etc. (I didn't know there was a whole furry subculture then, I just really liked the art. Heheh.) Goldenwolf, Kyoht, and Aimee Major became some favorites. Also, I found Vera Brosgol's site... She's still one of my favorite artists ever! I got into H.R. Giger at this point, as well as some others. Ooh! I was also wayyy addicted to neopets, so y'know... I had Neopets art, H.R. Giger-inspired work, anthro art, and fantasy stuff. I also drew some fashion designs and things. My quality of work was generally going up.

    Oh, did I mention this was my Year Of The Manga/Anime? I was into the beloved Japanese styles from this point on, but it definitely wasn't all I drew. Don't worry. And at this point, I started to get the much-dreaded "How to draw Manga" books. They helped me a bit, though, seriously... I don't think I was hindered by them tooooo much... Heheheh.

    At my parents' business, there was this one guy who always drew superheroes. He wanted to be a comic book artist or something, and his stuff was great. I decided to draw Spider Man because I saw the employee's drawing of it. The other employees thought it was him, and one apologized to him when her baby ripped it up. Lol.

    Age 12

    Okay, so this was my 6th grade year. I went back to my old school, and mostly drew girls and fantasy things. Robots, too. My robots were pretty sweet. I created a comic called "Calli's Conscience" about a girl, Calli, who can see her conscience. Y'know, the devil/angel on the shoulder thing. My art was generally a little weird in the anatomy, but, I was working on it.

    I went to Italy that year. Hooooo boy. Whatta great place, seriously. We went to Rome, Gubbio, and Florence. While here, we saw the Sistine Chapel, a couple of art museums, and a few other landmarks... The art was overwhelming. And amazing. It made me want to draw more realistically. On the flight back to the USA, an art professor from Florence complimented my art and tipped me on proportions. I spazzed out, I thought it was so cool! Heheh. From this point on, of course, my proportions were a bit better.

    Age 13

    Seventh grade. Fun stuff. I was totally into drawing fashion and pretty people. I tried boys, and developed my anatomy, etc. My art was getting a ton better, I was experimenting with watercolors, etc... and in this grade I produced a Peter Max inspired piece in art that got an award. It was fun. I was getting a much better grasp on anatomy by the middle of the year. I also took a couple of classes at Barnestone. It's an amazing school in Bethlehem. However, I only got to learn a bit about perspective there before I had to go. Oh well, it was really useful.

    Age 13-14

    By grade 8, (last year) I started really focusing on my anatomy. Like, doing muscle studies and what not. My superheroes got a loooot better, as did my peeople... This is too close to where I am, though, to really talk about.

    If you want to see where I am now, go and take a look at my sketchbook.
    Sketchbook

    HEY LOOK AT DIS

  19. #16
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    I've always been the type of kid that draws better than the others in his class, although my coloring style was frowned upon, I used to put color out of the lines vs the tight style that was more liked (rofl) so we came up with a production methodology where I drew and the mate by my side colored, as he was cleaner and better colorist (ie he put the color inside the lines with all the strokes facing the same direction) and when we had to do some drawing for our teacher, I drew and he colored for both drawings (his and mine) but some day a teacher found out and told us not to. That was my friend's art career end, but I kept drawing.

    Then I stopped drawing (I drew a few things each year, or scribbled a bit on the margins) for a lot of time when I was 15 or so, and until 20 I never studied it seriously. From 14 to 19 or so, I barely made any improvement, and this last 2 years I've improved a lot, hopefully this pace will continue for some years at least. So when you are 13-15 it's the moment to start taking drawing lessons. I think that was the age at which most old masters started in his Master's Workshop.

  20. #17
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    As a culture we don't really value art beyond the point of where it becomes useful, or practical. There really isn't much of a focus on any form of self expression to be found in Western Public Schooling. Culturaly we are devoid of any real apreciation for art in any form. Songs are ringtones, art is screen savers. Television helps to rob children of their observational skills and imagination leaving them with time passed but at no real gain. How can we excpect them to develop without even the most basic encouragement?

  21. #18
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    It's not as bad as you say it is. Children are encouraged to make art until they become teenagers. Society has a limited view of what a teenager should be, and the future is not very bright for high schoolers who are not good at science, math, or sports.

    Television gives you the opportunity to waste time, but it's also potential fuel for the imagination. No one's going to argue that oprah is a work of art, but there are many more tv shows every day that are art. Shows where you have to think to know what's going on are in style now, thanks to csi. (I don't like csi, I'm just saying they started the trend.) Even the most brain dead tv shows are more cerebral than they used to be.

  22. #19
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    that's basically my process of creating...everything starts with a happy doodle and ends up with either a feeling of wanting to do better or to just quit and become a plumber.

    ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny indeed
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  23. #20
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    This is a cool read; I like Betty Edward's take on take on things.
    Recently, I unearthed a lot of crayon drawings and pencil sketches from the elementary school days, and I think I can see some of the stages and transitions summarized in that chart. I posted a lot of stuff in the thread linked below if anyone is interested, but it would be cool to see what sort of drawings others have laying around though. I attached my favorite drawing from the early schematic phase (age 6), in the hopes that others might share too.

    Thanks Android
    Last edited by Jasonwclark; December 5th, 2007 at 12:14 AM.

  24. #21
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    I hope that my art doesn't resemble the face on the 14-16 year age.
    That'd suck, imo.
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  25. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Some Paint art of my little sister when she was 6 and 7 *proud*
    Unfortunatly she has reached that age (12 years) where she's becoming shy/embarassed about the drawings she's making.

    last pic: the artist making halloween candy
    Dude those are awesome! Give her a wacom and lots of encouragement. A seven year old drawing with perspective?!?!?

  26. #23
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    Boy, do I remember the Crisis Stage. That was a period for me when I was starting to let comics go and get into more painterly art. Although I did carry my love for John Byrne with me for a long time. But by the time I was 16 I had just (or soon to be) finished with LOTR and I was deeply immersed in Frazetta and Boris's work. I was also hugely into Berni Wrightson at the time as well. So I did a lot of emulation of those guys for the longest time (with very mixed results, of course). But I think it was the fact that I literally surrounded myself with influences from all angles that got me though that stage. Becasue it was then that it dawned on me just how daunting the road ahead would become.
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  27. #24
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    yeah i skipped straight to the 6-8 year stage, used to fill scrapbook after scrapbook with teenage mutant ninja turtles and sonic the hedgehog (i kid you not, pardon the pun). i grew up with richard scary and graham base books, so i ALWAYS added as much detail as i could. from about age 9-10, with the advent of my first computer (a glorified calculator the size of a refrigerator) i became obsessed with MS Paint, and my parents will testify that i would spend hours on end with my face mere inches from the miniscule screen, trying to draw realistic people in MS Paint with a mouse. age 12 saw me get my first graphics tablet, a 12x18" monster with the pen attached to the tablet via a cable (no such thing as cordless back then!) and Fractal Painter 5.0. unfortunately, the remainder of my adolescent years were mis-spent as far as art was concerned - more so i wasnt nurtured because none of my art teachers had any clue, let alone skill i could gain from. sure i won contests and such, but i give no credit to my teachers. TV and comic books would probably be the biggest inspirations for me in this time. that is, until i discovered CA back in '05. now, im in art-heaven

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