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  1. #53
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    Havent read it all yet but i just wanted to stop by and say: Woow!

    Big massive Thank you!!

    Gorgeous, really!

    Thanx again.

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  3. #54
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    Hey David

    Just downloaded the Colorspace program after seeing you mention it on an old thread. Seems like a really useful program and I look forward to playing around with it.

    I was wondering if you could explain why you use the YCbCr space to plot the color space diagrams here and on your color site...

    Thanks!

    Tim

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  4. #55
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    briggsy@ashtons,

    First off, you've put together a really nice resource. I'm sure a lot of hard work went into it and it shows. The presentation/color scheme of the site is simple and effective.

    You stated earlier that the site wasn't necessarily meant to be a resource for beginners. As a beginner, I think I understand why. A lot of my problem is even if I understand the concepts, I don't have anything to apply them to. I have so little knowledge of basic color theory. Which brings me to my question: What are some good resources for beginners to color?

    I've searched around some on the internet and CA for anything, and it looks like there are one hundred and one different ways to approach color. The sheer size of the subject and opinions on it have in many ways baffled me. I have no idea where to start, so I decided to bring the question to you, someone who's opinion and knowledge of color I respect.

    Any advice would be appreciated greatly. Thanks for making such a valuable resource available to everyone. (hey, I may not be able to apply it to my art yet, but I know value when I see it. )

    My Sketchbook

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  5. #56
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    Red face

    Thanks a million...Gr8 help for beginners like me.

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  6. #57
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    I dont understand but noooothing at all... thought I saved it on the computer knowing it GOT potential not yet discovered by my totally confused brain, I think a lil theory (written) could accompany this graphic since I'm asking so much questions about color theory!
    Great work!

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  7. #58
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    Thanks for the comments everyone and sorry I haven't been back to this thread for a while!

    Dose, that's a very good question and one that I'm going to have to explain better on the site. For now the short answer is that YCbCr is quite good as a representation of hue-value-chroma: distances outwards from the Y axis correspond very closely with Munsell chroma for a given hue, while Y corresponds fairly closely though not exactly with lightness. I'll add some diagrams on the site to show this more clearly.

    To everyone who is finding it hard to know where to start, the really essential thing is that you get used to thinking of colours in terms of three-dimensional spaces. That means hue, value and chroma when thinking of colours of surfaces, but also hue, brightness and saturation when thinking in terms of colours of light. The former dimensions and their importance are relatively widely known among painters, but currently even the best available resources generally miss the significance and even the existence of the different set of dimensions for colours of light. The site is really an attempt to clear this and a few other matters up for people who, like many here, are already familiar with these available resources. I'm still planning additions to make some things easier to understand, but a resouce written for complete beginners would be a quite different site.

    In my courses I do take colour from absolute basics for complete beginners, and one day I might put this stuff together, perhaps as a book. But in the meantime, to get a grasp of hue, value and chroma I very highly recommend the exercises and text in the The New Munsell Student Color Set. Once you've worked your way through that, I doubt if my site will still hold any terrors for you.

    Having said all that though, I'd be happy to try setting and commenting on some exercises in thinking about colour on this thread if anyone is interested.

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  8. #59
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    For now the short answer is that YCbCr is quite good as a representation of hue-value-chroma
    I figured it was something like that. I'll keep an eye out for those diagrams on the site- would love to see more specifics. In the meantime I'll read up on YCbCr.

    the really essential thing is that you get used to thinking of colours in terms of three-dimensional spaces.
    This is something I've sort of intuitively started doing over the years as I've learned about color, but reading that sentence really crystallized something for me.

    Thanks again!

    Tim

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  9. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by dose View Post
    ... reading that sentence really crystallized something for me.
    Ah, yes ... I know those crystals ... they're my favorite drug!

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  10. #61
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    David - just a thanks for all the effort and hard work put into this site.

    I have to admit that for someone who knows absolutely nothing about the concepts (and was rubbish at physics at school), it's extremely hard-going but that isn't your fault at all... it's a complex subject. Ever thought of doing a "Complete Idiot's Guide"...

    ... you're going to tell me that this IS the complete idiot's guide aren't you?

    I will persevere - I'm sure it'll all start to click in place eventually and I have already learnt much from it. Well done.

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  11. #62
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    Thank you, this looks wonderful
    some really great info you've put together!

    __________________
    makepolo

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  12. #63
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    Thanks again for the replies! Here's a colour exercise that I thought some people here might like to try.

    I've just finished teaching a short course on colour and light at Billy Blue in Sydney, which was the first one I have given specifically focused on the digital environment. (The workshops I give at Ashton's cater more for traditional media). Towards the end of the course I introduced a variation on the old sphere painting exercise, where I got the students to analyze photographs (ripped off from Flickr) for lighting and atmosphere, and then paint in a sphere so that it looked compatible. You need to decide on the directions, sizes, colours, and relative brightnesses of the main and secondary light sources, and then paint the modeling, highlights, form shadows and cast shadows accordingly. I asked the students to colour the spheres so that they looked bright coloured, that is, neither glowing nor greyed, but you could go on to make them look luminous as a variation. I also worked out an OK way of faking spherical reflections based on the content of the photos. Later we did some misty scenes that required addition of atmospheric perspective. You might also want to look at the image characteristics of the photo and perhaps add some grain and/or blur
    to really get the spheres to blend in, though this was not really the focus of my course.

    I found this exercise to be really good for drawing together the stuff we had covered on light and colour, as well as all the ways of choosing and adjusting colour in Photoshop.

    Anyone care to give it a try?

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  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to briggsy@ashtons For This Useful Post:


  14. #64
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    wow briggsy, what a cool exercise! i wish we had such a cool teacher when I was there at billy blue. it warms my heart to see that you are still teaching there and that you have such responsive students!

    i have a lot of news to share, i will have to come see you sometime and give you the lowdown!! would be good to catch up. are you around during any of the drop in sessions at ashtons?

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  15. #65
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    Hi Adam, it'd be great to catch up! This week I should be at Ashton's on Wednesday night and all day Saturday and Sunday, if any of those times suit. After that there's a break over Christmas until my first workshop there on the 29th.

    Unfortunately this year may have been my last undergraduate class at BB, at least for a while. The new course has a lot less drawing in it, and with Debby, Edwina and a couple of others they have more drawing teachers than they need. Hopefully something will turn up there eventually as I really love the place, and the students have been great. I'm still down to teach my colour "masterclasses" for the general public there next year, so at least I'll have some involvement.

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