Best Art school in Belgium: Recommend please?

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  1. #1
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    Best Art school in Belgium: Recommend please?

    Hi there.

    Belgium looks like an interesting place to learn illustration, what with the majority of Europe's finest from Herge of Tintin to Walthery being from there.

    What are the best art schools in Belgium can you recommend?

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    if you want atsy fartsy St. Lukas and CASK might be your thing, do note that allot of Animation (and a few Illustration) students from SL run to another school afther a year.

    That school would be my current one ; RITS , but when it comes to art thers only Animation.

    I live in Belgium, to be honost ... I don't like what I have seen. Theory always goes above practice.

    if you need more info feel free to PM , I'v been in Sint Lucas Antwerp and I go to RITS Brussels.

    time to get drilled.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...02#post1551002

    break me down, build me back up. I'd love you for ever.
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  4. #3
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    Short answer: None.
    Long answer: Really, none. Go to an atelier in Italy or so.

    At least you'll learn to draw correctly.

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    Thanks Hyskoa.

    Which ateliers in Italy would you recommend?

    Otherwise, are there any good ateliers or studio art schools in Belgium?

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    What kind of art education are you looking for?

    I'm afraid the above is true. There simply isn't any decent art education provided by government funded schools in Belgium. And I know of no private schools that offer anything else. Running somehing like that would be extremely hard too since all higher edcation in Belgium is practically for free, nobody even considers paying for decent knowledge. Most people here live in their own little bubble, I'm afraid. The ones that don't go abroad

    It's a shame really, considering where we stood 150-200 years ago. none of it is preserved.

    If you want to learn to draw and paint traditionally or are looking for some kind of classical approach I can realy recommend Studio Escalier in Argenton-Chateau,France. It's ran by Timothy Stotz and Michelle Tully. 2 extremely fine draughtsmen and gifted teachers, both students of Ted Jacobs.

    Odd Nerdrum takes in students apprentice style (helping him in the studio, grinding paints etc... ) I've heard but I can not comment on what you would be learning there.

    Florence is tricky... i've heard some good things and some VERY bad things about the ateliers there. It's very expensive as well. A friend of mine went to Angel but was not pleased by the experience there. Many older students teach the younger ones.... extreme dedications to completing certain assignments before allowed to progress while you might as well do them at home and not pay that much money etc... i've heard better things from Florence Academy but it's much bigger. Might be an advantage, might not be, I don't know. Cannot comment on Cecil studios. it's similar in approach as the others but not as rigid I heard.

    Your best bet would be Studio Escalier in my opinion. The information you'll get there along with personal critique's day in day out, 6 hours a day cannot be beat by any other. Very personal approach. Highly recommended!!

    Good luck on your journey !
    Tom

    www.tomvandewouwer.com

    "There is no such thing as 'accurate drawing'. There is beautiful
    drawing, and ugly, and nothing else." JAD Ingres, Ecrits sur l'art
    (1780-1865)"
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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art_Addict View Post
    What kind of art education are you looking for?
    I seek to follow the examples of Europe's best illustrators & cartoonists in comics. I've heard they have solid art foundation underneath their seemingly simple & cartoonish illustrations. I thought Belgium might be the best place as it's where most of the best European comics have thrived since Tintin by Herge, and the rest follow: Walthery's Natacha, Lucky Luke, Asterix, Spirou, XIII which is now a video game by Ubisoft and of course Smurfs. I'm more towards the "Marcinelle school" which emphasize movement & expression and counters the Ligne Claire art form (Although Henk Kuijper's Franka has best of both). In short, I wish to learn from the Franco-Belgian school of comics art.

    I'm thinking a stronger art foundation is needed to support my art, and I consider something like the Realist Art school in Europe would help. Europe has build a strong legacy & tradition of art, and I wish to learn from them.

    I don't seek any diplomas or degrees, just a simple art class would be fine.

    Last edited by Germania; December 1st, 2007 at 12:13 AM.
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    There is an art school in Florence that focuses on classical realism. Their student works are impressive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Germania View Post
    I seek to follow the examples of Europe's best illustrators & cartoonists in comics. I've heard they have solid art foundation underneath their seemingly simple & cartoonish illustrations. I thought Belgium might be the best place as it's where most of the best European comics have thrived since Tintin by Herge, and the rest follow: Walthery's Natacha, Lucky Luke, Asterix, Spirou, XIII which is now a video game by Ubisoft and of course Smurfs. I'm more towards the "Marcinelle school" which emphasize movement & expression and counters the Ligne Claire art form (Although Henk Kuijper's Franka has best of both). In short, I wish to learn from the Franco-Belgian school of comics art.
    In my opinion, the tradition of what you call the Franco-Belgian school is history: most of your examples are really old or even dead. As far as I know, the 'school' has never been caught in an institute, so don't expect to find a place where you can learn from the masters.

    As I see it, this Franco-Belgian school is dying. The old masters from the past have never been succeeded by a younger generation, and magazines like Tin Tin and Spirou are slowly disappearing. In The Netherlands, the original Dutch comic magazines disappeared in, I believe, the early 80s, while, more recently, the Dutch versions of Tin Tin and Spirou (Kuifje and Robbedoes) have ceased to exist. And I'm afraid this is not just a Dutch phenomenon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Germania View Post
    I seek to follow the examples of Europe's best illustrators & cartoonists in comics. I've heard they have solid art foundation underneath their seemingly simple & cartoonish illustrations. I thought Belgium might be the best place as it's where most of the best European comics have thrived since Tintin by Herge, and the rest follow: Walthery's Natacha, Lucky Luke, Asterix, Spirou, XIII which is now a video game by Ubisoft and of course Smurfs. I'm more towards the "Marcinelle school" which emphasize movement & expression and counters the Ligne Claire art form (Although Henk Kuijper's Franka has best of both). In short, I wish to learn from the Franco-Belgian school of comics art.

    I'm thinking a stronger art foundation is needed to support my art, and I consider something like the Realist Art school in Europe would help. Europe has build a strong legacy & tradition of art, and I wish to learn from them.

    I don't seek any diplomas or degrees, just a simple art class would be fine.

    Ah, I see.
    Well, I assumed you were talking about going into concept art or alike. You know, still pictures that have to have their own worth without a sequential thought.

    In your case I would rather advise model drawing night classes + a 4 year course in animation in KASK gent.
    Tintin has a line fluency and a character consistency as well as expressiveness which is usually very well taught in those types of education.
    It's semi fine art, semi technical and lots of work.

    Basicly you'll be drawing the same charactersheet hundreds of times over and over again training you to create characters with that in mind. Which is most likely what herge did.

    I'm now doing fine arts - painting at kask and am doing a minor in animation on the side, just to get a feel for it, and in 3 months of 4 hours a week I did like 1-200 drawings focussing on a single character.
    Now imagine what an entire education will give you.

    Now you might want to add night modeldrawing classes and weekend drawing classes to that. Night classes are 150 euro/year and weekend drawing classes are something which you'll have to organize yourself.

    So after 4 years you won't have a purely realistic style, but you will have a line fluency, a character translation ability and a sequential thought process needed to create comics such as herge and others.


    While if you went to an atelier in italy or america, you would become amazing at producing a still image, a single one of whatever subject was needed, but it would be an entire process of building up a process, not smooth single line stroke. Also, having different images interconnect and work with eachother will be much more difficult for atelier people than animation people.

    Also, it will be very easy, if, perchance, you become succesfull and need a serie televized to give instructions to a crew of other animators since that's what that education also does.


    Good luck

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    I'm just gonna say this, the attitude from most students and teachers in belgium is very wrong, there are exceptions though but they are rare.

    The animation courses are pretty good from what I've heard although the quality of those school were much better years ago.

    If you want to follow illustrators and cartoonists you better stay out of belgium You need to learn how to draw well, not to animate.

    Studio Escalier looks really good, look into that.

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    Sadly enough i have to agree with what is said earlyer in this topic.
    Belgium is on e of the worst places imo to follow creative courses. I have seen them all and done some of them...

    And if you are planning on learning it all by yourself and someday become a great conceptartist/illustrator you wouldn t find any interesting job here anywayz.

    So to all reading this: GET OUT OF BELGIUM WHEN YOU STILL CAN! ruuun! ruuuuuun!!!!

    _.·´¯`·-> Choose Life <-·´¯`·._
    Check me out
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  15. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    Ah, I see.
    Well, I assumed you were talking about going into concept art or alike. You know, still pictures that have to have their own worth without a sequential thought.

    In your case I would rather advise model drawing night classes + a 4 year course in animation in KASK gent.
    Tintin has a line fluency and a character consistency as well as expressiveness which is usually very well taught in those types of education.
    It's semi fine art, semi technical and lots of work.

    Basicly you'll be drawing the same charactersheet hundreds of times over and over again training you to create characters with that in mind. Which is most likely what herge did.

    I'm now doing fine arts - painting at kask and am doing a minor in animation on the side, just to get a feel for it, and in 3 months of 4 hours a week I did like 1-200 drawings focussing on a single character.
    Now imagine what an entire education will give you.

    Now you might want to add night modeldrawing classes and weekend drawing classes to that. Night classes are 150 euro/year and weekend drawing classes are something which you'll have to organize yourself.

    So after 4 years you won't have a purely realistic style, but you will have a line fluency, a character translation ability and a sequential thought process needed to create comics such as herge and others.


    While if you went to an atelier in italy or america, you would become amazing at producing a still image, a single one of whatever subject was needed, but it would be an entire process of building up a process, not smooth single line stroke. Also, having different images interconnect and work with eachother will be much more difficult for atelier people than animation people.

    Also, it will be very easy, if, perchance, you become succesfull and need a serie televized to give instructions to a crew of other animators since that's what that education also does.


    Good luck
    Thanks!

    Reading through this post, how is it that learning the realist style is any different from learning animation?

    Besides that, Italy seems like a good alternative. The country has it's own fair share of rich legacy & tradition of art, c'mon, Roman Empire & Renaissance, that's where it's at. But also a equally rich pool of comics talent. What's hot right now is the illustration & comic style that combines the expressiveness of Disney-style with the wide-eyed innocence of Manga, starting with Alessandro Barbucci and Elena De Grimani. A great complement to your recommended Atelier studies.

    I've checked out Florence Academy of Art & Charles H Cecil Studios on Internet. What's your opinion of those two schools?

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  16. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Germania View Post
    Thanks!

    Reading through this post, how is it that learning the realist style is any different from learning animation?
    If you would consider animation and fine art in the strictest of norms then with fine art you would work on a single image until it's perfect and with animation on several hundred images until you create the perfect one.
    In the end you end up with a perfect image, but it's the road which is basicly different.
    In the end, after an ungodlike amount of practise, the fine artist will be able to construct an entire picture in his head before he puts down a brush stroke and alter it until it looks perfect then paint it down. While the animator cycles through literally hundreds of pictures and compositions in his head to make the image or serie of images that best tell the story.

    Now as to why the second method of learning would be better for comics and alike. Well. Let's look at the mental process.
    As a fine artist, you will occupy your mind with the image/page at hand making sure every single part is equally balanced and set out. Nothing wrong with that.
    Now an animator on the other hand will be doing quick drawings and cycling this small part of the story through his head thousands of times during the making of the comic to make sure the entire book is consistent. You might have some pages that are lackluster to look at, but in the end, you will have a strong story imagewise. Stronger in fact than the graphic artist who will have an urge to threath every page as an indivdual piece of work or just smear his style over every page to combine the pages.

    Animation will learn you where to exagerate, where to hold back, what to do at what point and what will look badly. A million little rules, but they work.
    Whereas fine art teaches you about the soul of an image.

    So in a perfect world, you'd need the mindset of an animator and the experience fine arts artist. Sadly, budget-wise/time-wise, this isn't always doable, so it's best to just go for the main mindset, which is animation.
    Besides that, Italy seems like a good alternative. The country has it's own fair share of rich legacy & tradition of art, c'mon, Roman Empire & Renaissance, that's where it's at. But also a equally rich pool of comics talent. What's hot right now is the illustration & comic style that combines the expressiveness of Disney-style with the wide-eyed innocence of Manga, starting with Alessandro Barbucci and Elena De Grimani. A great complement to your recommended Atelier studies.

    I've checked out Florence Academy of Art & Charles H Cecil Studios on Internet. What's your opinion of those two schools?
    For fine art, which is what I'm doing, I'd go there, if people would pay for me, in a bloody heartbeat
    But by all means, if you find a better traditional (this part is important) animation program in another country, do check it out, it's your future after all.

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    Thanks again, Hyskoa.

    I'm planning to do stage by stage, instead of taking them all in. The question now, should I start learning animation & comics first and later on, Realist art later, or vice versa?

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    People tend to stick with the first teaching method they are given and then see everything from that perspective.
    They can ofcourse learn new perspectives, but it tends to be much harder and one has to ask him/herself if it's really worth not keeping up with your old methods to learn something new.

    So I would say go with animation first, full 4 years and then a specialisation course of 1-3 years(whatever time you have left) in fine art.

    You'll have an animation degree that way which allows you to direct a group of animators and be a well rounded comic creator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyskoa View Post
    Now you might want to add night modeldrawing classes and weekend drawing classes to that. Night classes are 150 euro/year and weekend drawing classes are something which you'll have to organize yourself.
    What is your opinion about the evening/night classes? I'm planning to follow them when the new schoolyear begins. But when I look at this website http://ik-wil-tekenen.blogspot.com
    I see more "artsy fartsy" stuff instead of realistic drawing... And they only start with models in the third year, that would mean I would still have to wait 2 years or so...

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