Scanning LARGE images with a tiny scanner
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Scanning LARGE images with a tiny scanner

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    403
    Thanks
    170
    Thanked 40 Times in 30 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Scanning LARGE images with a tiny scanner

    does anyone know how to scan images of a large size into painter without need of a large scanner? like maybe scanning the images in as pieces? if thats possible how would i 'piece' it together in painter? if there is already info on this i apologize...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The latest versions of Photoshop have a "photomerge" tool (designed for assembling panoramas) that does an excellent job.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kansas city, MO
    Posts
    1,167
    Thanks
    1,423
    Thanked 867 Times in 333 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    sometimes ill take a high res digital picture of it and work from there.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    403
    Thanks
    170
    Thanked 40 Times in 30 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thank you both for the info, i was thinking maybe i had to resort to taking a pic with a digital cam too. i also thought that photoshop would probably be the better tool for what i'm trying to do elwell, unfortunately i don't have photoshop just painter . but i very much appreciate your responses.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    OK, if you have to do it by hand, here are some tips:
    Make sure you're using your scanner software in "advanced" (or the equivalent) mode, and turn off ALL automatic adjustments. You want every scan to use the exact same settings.
    As much as you can, try to keep the edges of your piece perfectly lined up with the scanner glass. If they're not, fixing skews is pretty easy in PS, I'm afraid I can't help you with Painter.
    Open a new canvas a little bit bigger the the full sized piece and copy, drag, or import all the scans into it. Move them around until everything is lined up (playing around with transparency and/or layer modes can help), then carefully erase to hide the overlaps. Finally, flatten, crop, and do any necessary color adjustment.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Scan all the parts, making sure they overlap enough to erase the edges if need be. Create a new file that's a little bit bigger then you'll need for the final image and copy>paste all the scans into it. The edges of my large scans are always warped because they don't sit all the way down on the glass so I either make a marque selection and delete the edges or use the eraser. I use a hard edged eraser to avoid making any textures or lines fuzzy.

    Also if I'm scanning a large face (or something else large and important in the middle) and I have to scan it in 4 pieces I'll usually make one more scan right in the middle because thats the important part and I want it right. Then I erase or select>delete all around the edges of that middle scan and put it on the top layer and match the other scans to it. Even if you only have 2 or 4 scans you need to choose one of the scans(layers) to be 'correct' and match the others to it.

    I'll set the top layer to about 50% opacity and start moving stuff around. I try to keep the zoom level at 25%, 50%, or 100% because at 33% or 66% the image looks less clear. To rotate a layer use Effects>Orientation>Rotate. Usually I only need a real small change like +/- .5 degree. One way to check if you're really lined up is to set the layer property of the top layer to "Difference". Then when the layers are lined up exactly the image will be solid black where they overlap. Then set it back to Default. But that is usually taking it a bit far and I don't normally care to work that hard on getting it matched up. If it looks good to the eye then that's good enough.

    If any of the layers look brighter or darker then it's neighbor adjust the value before you drop or group them. I use Effects>Tonal Control>Adjust Colors. You could also use the dodge or burn tools under the Photo brush category for small changes. Also immediately after dropping or merging all the layers together I use Effects>Tonal Control>Adjust Colors again and mess around with saturation and value to see if there are any slight value or color differences that I may not have noticed but may show up later if I make an adjustment. Undo the merging if anything does show up and adjust the layers again.

    Can't think of anything else...

    D

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Scan all the parts, making sure they overlap enough to erase the edges if need be. Create a new file that's a little bit bigger then you'll need for the final image and copy>paste all the scans into it. The edges of my large scans are always warped because they don't sit all the way down on the glass so I either make a marque selection and delete the edges or use the eraser. I use a hard edged eraser to avoid making any textures or lines fuzzy.

    Also if I'm scanning a large face (or something else large and important in the middle) and I have to scan it in 4 pieces I'll usually make one more scan right in the middle because thats the important part and I want it right. Then I erase or select>delete all around the edges of that middle scan and put it on the top layer and match the other scans to it. Even if you only have 2 or 4 scans you need to choose one of the scans(layers) to be 'correct' and match the others to it.

    I'll set the top layer to about 50% opacity and start moving stuff around. I try to keep the zoom level at 25%, 50%, or 100% because at 33% or 66% the image looks less clear. To rotate a layer use Effects>Orientation>Rotate. Usually I only need a real small change like +/- .5 degree. One way to check if you're really lined up is to set the layer property of the top layer to "Difference". Then when the layers are lined up exactly the image will be solid black where they overlap. Then set it back to Default. But that is usually taking it a bit far and I don't normally care to work that hard on getting it matched up. If it looks good to the eye then that's good enough.

    If any of the layers look brighter or darker then it's neighbor adjust the value before you drop or group them. I use Effects>Tonal Control>Adjust Colors. You could also use the dodge or burn tools under the Photo brush category for small changes. Also immediately after dropping or merging all the layers together I use Effects>Tonal Control>Adjust Colors again and mess around with saturation and value to see if there are any slight value or color differences that I may not have noticed but may show up later if I make an adjustment. Undo the merging if anything does show up and adjust the layers again.

    Can't think of anything else...

    D

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by eskanto View Post
    I also thought that Photoshop would probably be the better tool for what I'm trying to do elwell, unfortunately I don't have Photoshop just Painter . but I very much appreciate your responses.
    eskanto,

    There are several third party image stitching software solutions that are good for piecing small scans together to make a large image. Panoramic images can be made that way, but what you want to do with multiple scans of a larger picture is called a mosaic. One product that comes to mind is from PanaVue. Their lower priced ($64 USD) product, called PanaVue ImageAssembler Standard, can do either panoramics or mosaics, and it could probably assemble your pieces into a combined image. Whether it is worth a $64 investment would depend entirely on how much of this sort of work you need to do. I used an earlier version of PanaVue ImageAssembler with good results, but I have since "graduated" to more expensive image stitching software.

    There are also free panoramic tools that can do the same job, although with a somewhat steeper learning curve. PanaVue has a free downloadable demo, but it puts small watermarks on the stitched image. However, it would show how to use the product and give you a good idea what you can get out of it. You could save the stitched image and open it in Painter for further work. If you decide to try the demo, you should also download the documentation that goes with the product.

    Another capable stitching program that doesn't cost a lot for what it does is Stitcher Express from RealViz.

    GB

    Last edited by greybeard; December 11th, 2007 at 01:18 AM. Reason: add Stitcher Express mention
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •